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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone running an x500 series garden tractor? Experiences? Opinions?

I need something to mow a large, sometimes bumpy, lawn and move firewood around. No snow action planned.

I’ve read lots online and it seems the K72 transmission is the one to get for longevity.
 

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Hello Lunta,

You will be better off investing in a high quality BCS 2 wheel tractor as it is all gear drive.
The BCS folks have a riding sulky and also a riding trailer with seat on the front of the
trailer to let you ride on the trailer while hauling wood.

My poor experience with the JDLA115 has soured me on this brand of low end lawn tractors.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the suggestion Leonz but I’m really looking for something manoeuvrable, both forward and backwards. And not too long, to get in to tighter spaces. Plus my wife needs to be able to use it easily.

My research on the Deere models has shown:

100 Cheap and ok for very light duty. No slopes and no pulling.
300 The entry level model of the “reasonable quality” range. K46 transmission non serviceable. Can fail if asked to do too much.
500 Like 300 but with better and serviceable tranny.
700 Big and robust, but pricing gets towards the cost of a “real” utility tractor.
 

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Those LA John Deere are made by Murray, a very poor quality tractor.
If you want maneuverability you should check into a Simplicity, they steer very well and make very tight turns, plus they are built better than John Deere.
The old Deere's were built better, ones 30 or more years old. The new ones are not built well at all, they got cheap with everything.
If you want a rugged tractor, look into an old Gravely gear drive walk behind or a 4 wheel tractor. Go for the ones built before Areins took over Gravely. Areins got cheap with everything and the quality is not built in anything made by Areins.
Those Hydro Gear transmissions are not made very well and won't hold up to much work, even their heavier duty transmissions. Hydro Gear uses low quality materials in their manufacturing and their engineers are not very experienced at what they are paid to do, but what do you expect for someone with a college degree in "No Common Sense".
The Hydro Gear transmissions used in John Deere are of lower quality than used in other manufacturers machines due to cost savings for John Deere.
J.D. tells the parts suppliers to manufacture their parts a certain way and that's what the parts supplier does, even though the supplier does not like to do that.
From a lot of experience, we try to stay away from anything newer made by John Deere.
 

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Discussion Starter #8

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a friend of mine has a 500 series........less than 300 hrs of gentle use and the trans slips bad after it gets warm...wont climb the slightest incline.
i would look at kubota.
 

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Those TuffTorq tranny's are a lot weaker and poorer built than the Hydrogear units.
J.D. is noted for weak poor performing hydro transmissions.
J.D. tells the manufacturers of the hydro tranny's to build them a certain way, which is extremely weak and poor to begin with and the transmission manufacturer tells Deere about it, but Deere tells them to build it that way or Deere will cancel the contract with them.
Deere is just trying to save a "Buck" for themselves and pocket the profits, they could care less about the consumer because everyone buys off of their name, but Deere is really hurting their reputation doing that, and that has been going on for over the past two decades.
Deere has switched from different manufacturers like Eaton, HydroGear, TuffTorq, and others over the years. Whoever gives them the best price is who they go with for their supplier, but the stick mainly with Kawasaki engines.
Changing the Trans fluid might help if it has high hours on it, and if it has "Low Viscosity" oil in it, meaning very thin used for very cold weather and low loads, then have it switched to a higher viscosity oil, and a better quality oil than what Deere calls for.
But once they start slipping when they are hot, its too late, and time for a rebuild. The pistons and cylinder blocks that hold the pistons wear out very quickly due to the very poor quality materials and steel used in manufacturing them which Deere is known for.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
@ST1100A Thanks for your comments, but which series are you referring to? Everything I've read suggests the X300, X500 and X700 models are in a totally different class to the X100 models.
 
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