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Discussion Starter #1
I purchased my Simplicity 8560EI (mfn# 1694845) from a local dealer in 2007. It has only been to the dealer once for a recall for a primer bulb. The machine is equipped with a Briggs & Stratton Snow Intek 8.5 hp engine. Now this where the mystery begins...

It has been at the shop for the second time ever for general maintenance oil change, spark plug, belt check, scraper bar....and a Dipstick that is not reading correctly? Yes, the dealer called he was waiting a replacement dipstick because the one i had was not reading correctly?

He called me again (few days later) to tell me that the problem is not with the dipstick. He said that some removed the engine, probably to fix a leak or sump pump and now the dipstick incorrectly. He showed me bolts that appeared to have been "used" and show me the the dipstick oil level was show a reading the would indicate that I had to much oil but even though the correct amount of 20 ounces was in the the machine.

I changed the oil ounce myself spring of 2009. I drained the machine and put the exact amount of 20 ounce of Briggs and Stratton snow blower oil

The dealer is trying to tell me that the machine was serviced by someone else even though I know this is impossible.

So he had a tech re-mark the dipstick with the fill line at the level of 20 ounces.

Other details: when I purchased this machine it was the last one of the 8560EI's. The newer models where in. He sold it to me for $900. I felt this was a good deal because the newer model was selling for $1,200.

It could be that this irregularity has existed the whole time. For some reason I do not recall it? I just do not know.

Can anyone give me any clues as to what might be going on here?
 

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I have never heard of that, and it sounds kind of strange.
 

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Did you buy it new from this dealer? Has the dealership changed hands since 2007 and the person talking to you now is someone other than who sold it to you? If you know the machine's history, it hasn't been in the shop except for maintenance, and you haven't had any problems with it in that time, then I don't know what to tell you. That's a strange one for sure.:confused:
 

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My "similar bolt pattern theory?" Any thoughts?

bwdbrn1 & Shryp, Yes this is strange indeed. Thank you for your post. I purchased the snow blower from the dealer new in February of 2007. The dealership has not changed hands and has been owned by the same family since I have been shopping there. I have purchased other power equipment from them in the past without any problems.

I wonder if the following may have occurred. As stated in in my initial post. At the time when I purchased my Simplicity 8650EI it was the last 8650EI in inventory. Newer models were already in stock.

Could the dealer had a defective machine that he repaired using parts that he had on hand that fit the engine base bolt pattern? Although the parts may have looked similar and "fit" they could have been slightly different. Could this could account for the dipstick irregularity? Is this even possible? He sort of alluded that he sometimes cross references parts but he said he never does it unless it absolutely works. However, people make mistakes?


Any thoughts?
 

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Anything is possible. Maybe Briggs had a bad run and made some defective engines.
 

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Anything is possible. Maybe Briggs had a bad run and made some defective engines.
If this is true, then, as a dealer, wouldn't this fellow be aware of it ?
I don't know the answer, just asking, it seems logical to me that a dealer, wih all the information available to them should be able to explain this on a machine they sold as new and only serviced by themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Shryp,

Yes, that is the whole mystery here. He should know. His explanation is that I had it serviced by someone else. Which is absolutely false. I called Briggs & Stratton a couple of days ago. The representative I spoke to was not very helpful and his only explanation was "a procedural error on the part of the dealer when performing the oil change". The B&S representative said that it is not possible to drain all of the oil completely and that oil should be poured incrementaly until the desired fill level is reached on the dipstick. In other words, the engine manufacturer is saying that my dealer's mechanic made a mistake doing a routine oil change. It seems very unlikely to me that a dealer would make a rookie oversight in performing a routine maintence procedure like an oil change. I met the mechanic he seems to be pretty familiar with small engines.

I think I just do not have enough information to make any conclusions. My main concern is that I want to make sure that my engine has the correct oil level. My best bet may just to go with the dealer advice and use the modified dipstick he came up with.

The is a story to this whole thing however, I only have part of it. I have come up short with the dealer and and engine manufacturer.

Does anyone know what the signs of an small engine with too much oil in the crankcase would display? Smoke? Smell? Sound?

I did not see any of this since getting it back from the dealer. So is it safe to assume the modified dipstick is OK to use.
 

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Sounds to me like the dealer might have had more than one machine in for service at the same time, and got dip sticks mixed up. If you've got the wrong one for yours, and that particular dealer is the only one to have ever done service to it, then I'd almost bet somebody else has the wrong one in theirs too. Your dealer should certainly be able to come up with the correct one, and not just scratch a line on the one that's in it and call it good enough. It isn't hard for you, and especially for your dealer to look up the engine you have and come up with the part number for any part that is on your engine, and is correct for your engine. It isn't hard for you, and again, especially for your dealer to check the engine specs for the correct amount of oil to put in it.

If he's insisting that somebody else did something, and you know that it isn't possible, then the problem lies with the dealer.
 

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You may never figure out what happened. And calibrating a dipstick is not a bad thing to do. Dipsticks are mass-produced and may vary a small amount anyway.

If you are certain the recommended amount of oil is installed, and the level of that oil is accurately marked on the stick, then it shouldn’t be a problem to maintain the proper level.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Engine has three different "model types". New Lead?

bwdbrn1 , this was my original inclination. The dealer claims he ordered a new dipstick and the results were the same. Interesting, Maybe he really doesn't know what is going on? However, I never did see the "other" dipstick.

abumpa, the dipstick was re-marked about an 1 1/2 inches up from the original fill line. This seems to be a substantial deviation. I think you are correct that I will never know what is truly going on here and that I will have to live with this re-marked dipstick. Since the dealer ordered a new dipstick with the same results and there are marking on the engine's bolts (indicating they were tampered with) at the base I am inclined to think it may be something else.

New information. I did some research and discovered that the Briggs & Stratton engine that I have has 3 different model variations with three different Dipstick part numbers according to "model type"! Interesting, maybe I should order all three dipsticks and see if one of them works? Imagine that. I gleamed this information from the owners manual that i downloaded from the B&S website. I had to do this because the owners manual that the dealer gave me when I purchased my snowblower does not correspond to my engine. It is for a model that superseded mine. I know what you are probably all thinking and I am thinking the same thing. This dealer is clearly not organized.

My engine was the last model type listed. This indicates to me that it was the lastest engine in the series. Could it be that some parts of my engine are from the previous series?
 

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A simple solution drain and refill then check mark stick if needed!
 

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A Little late but since I just got the same machine your old dipstick is apparently right the 8560 e1 is 8.5 305 cc and briggs engine model 200000 which takes about 28 ounces as does the 210000 engine ... Dealer needs to read up on the proper engine.
 

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I have the same 8560EI with the 8.5HP engine, purhased Dec 2006. I have just done an oil change on mine, and the dipstick reads 1" overfull also. According to my owners manual, the 8.5 HP motor should take 28oz. of oil. However, the Briggs and Stratton manual says the 120000 and 150000 series engines take 18oz. oil, and the 200000 and 210000 series take 28oz.
On the metal cover just below my muffler is stamped: 15B194 0110 EI and: 05 08 05 FD.
Does anyone else think that this may be a 7.5HP motor with an 8.5HP decal on it? I have not approached the dealer with this question yet, as I have just discovered the discrepancy.
 

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OK, I leveled the machine so that the motor base was level and opened the oil fill plug at the base of the engine. Low and behold, exactly 8oz of oil poured out. This should now be the correct oil level, right? Having a fill tube and dipstick does not increase oil capacity does it?
 

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I do not know your specific configuration.

However, a fill tube that extends up from the block and has a
suitably extended dip stick is provided as a convenience to
encourage & facilitate checking & filling. (An improvement
over the oily thimble-sized caps of yore that thread directly
into the crankcase and which left the few who thought about
it wondering whether to take the level screwed in or loose on
top.) Such a fill tube does not contribute to fill capacity.

Edit to: 'does not contribute'
from: 'does does contribute'

.
 

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Exactly. The fill tube does not change the amount of oil required. Mine has both the fill tube and the crankcase fill plug. When the oil runs out of the cc fill plug, the dipstick still reads 1/8" to 1/4" overfull. So I will trust the dipstick and NOT the manual that tells me my engine needs 28oz oil. I have a later model (2012) Simplicity at my business, and it does not have the crankcase fill plugs so I am totally reliant on the dipstick.
 
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