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De-Glazing Pulleys

  • I always de-glaze pulleys as part of regular maintenance

    Votes: 1 9.1%
  • I always de-glaze pulleys when a belt breaks or is replaced

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • I've never de-glazed pulleys

    Votes: 7 63.6%
  • Only with an attributable problem have I de-glazed a pulley

    Votes: 2 18.2%
  • I think it's a good idea and will start doing it when a belt breaks

    Votes: 2 18.2%

  • Total voters
    11
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
You'll be able to choose more than one for voting.

I hit the button too soon and only voted for with an attributable problem but also wanted to vote for when a belt breaks.

Someone recently had a problem with a belt slipping. They used sandpaper and ran the engine to de-glaze the pulley and it stopped the slipping. I have done this when I've seen a really slick smooth shiny surface. I've decided that when I change a belt or a belt comes off, I'm going to de-glaze the pulley because "what the heck", it doesn't hurt, won't do any harm if you do it lightly and quickly, and it can only help.

I find the best sandpaper to use for de-glazing is belts from a belt sander. Very tough with the fabric backing, long so you can keep your hands away if you choose, and you can fold it in half lengthwise to make it easier to de-glaze.
 

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what grit sandpaper do you use for this?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The grit on belt sanders is not the same as sandpaper, it's much coarser and more open between granules to prevent clogging. I use 80 grit from broken belts. I want it rough, coarse. My thinking, if it's too fine it may cause a glaze.
 
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