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When you are using a carbureted snowblower, you encounter deep snow, you use a lower gear and make sure you have high RPMs, fresh gas, and a clean carburetor to ensure maximum power. With the higher RPMs, you are using more fuel by draining the fuel bowl faster.

With EFI, does it give you more power compared to a carbureted engine by readjusting the timing just a hair or does it more efficiently monitor the fuel where a snowblower with a carburetor would bog down in certain conditions while the EFI snowblower would not bog down in the same equivalent conditions? If so, noticeable?

Will we see small turbos on snowblowers? Not with the push with electric!?
 

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When you are using a carbureted snowblower, you encounter deep snow, you use a lower gear and make sure you have high RPMs, fresh gas, and a clean carburetor to ensure maximum power. With the higher RPMs, you are using more fuel by draining the fuel bowl faster.

With EFI, does it give you more power compared to a carbureted engine by readjusting the timing just a hair or does it more efficiently monitor the fuel where a snowblower with a carburetor would bog down in certain conditions while the EFI snowblower would not bog down in the same equivalent conditions? If so, noticeable?

Will we see small turbos on snowblowers? Not with the push with electric!?
It responds faster when hitting resistance. Click at the link and scroll down a little, you can see the difference in power and torque to the carburated engine same size.https://www.ariens.com/en-us/info/efi-ez-launch
 

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I sense a lot of advertising B.S. in that page.
My machine bogged down due to not having enough power, not due to the governor or anything else.

The fact that carbureted engines with mechanical governors can keep a generator engine within +-100 rpm of it's setting from no load to full load I just don't see it even being a "thing" on a snowblower.
 

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I sense a lot of advertising B.S. in that page.
My machine bogged down due to not having enough power, not due to the governor or anything else.

The fact that carbureted engines with mechanical governors can keep a generator engine within +-100 rpm of it's setting from no load to full load I just don't see it even being a "thing" on a snowblower.
You will find some BS, but I hear from a lot of users with experience that the EFI engines keeps up the revs when hitting heavy loads better than the machines with carbs. Might not be that important but I have received specificly that feedback more than once. So I know for a fact that is not BS, also from my own experience.
 

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Ariens makes good products. However, they typically over-market their technology and features. They used to be very cheesy in their marketing. It has gotten better although the Arien's attempt at EFI advantages for power and torque aren't that convincing. I'm not saying isn't better than carbureted engine, but nothing on their website is convincing me it is better. Zilch.

From the graph on their website, the hp and torque curves are almost identical, they are almost on top of one another. There may not be significant differences when it comes to actual performance. If the EFI engine can maintain 3500 rpm under heavy load, then there is usable power differences. Under 3400 RPM, I don't see how an EFI is better.

The throttle response to load may be quicker on an EFI engine, but not by much. The governor is electrically operated. It is implied that the operation of the governor is the same as a carburator engine. Unless Ariens reveal how electric governor actually works and response curves, I am not convinced that different is better.

There may be placebo effect from users of new technology and running a shiny new Ariens. If it is not scientifically measured and documented, it didn't happen. Also, showing graphs without citing test methods aren't scientific, it is more anecdotal seat of the pants warm fuzzy feeling.
 

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You will find some BS, but I hear from a lot of users with experience that the EFI engines keeps up the revs when hitting heavy loads better than the machines with carbs. Might not be that important but I have received specificly that feedback more than once. So I know for a fact that is not BS, also from my own experience.
So a carb'd 420 on the same size machine vs an EFI 420 and the EFI runs stronger and keeps the RPM up better?

My dad has told me several times his Hydropro 32 never bogs down and that's carb'ed with a B&S 420. He's said there's been times where the snow starts to pile in front of it and it starts to plow because the machine literally can't throw it fast enough but the engine has never showed any signs of not being able to keep up.
 

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Ariens makes good products. However, they typically over-market their technology and features. They used to be very cheesy in their marketing. It has gotten better although the Arien's attempt at EFI advantages for power and torque aren't that convincing. I'm not saying isn't better than carbureted engine, but nothing on their website is convincing me it is better. Zilch.

From the graph on their website, the hp and torque curves are almost identical, they are almost on top of one another. There may not be significant differences when it comes to actual performance. If the EFI engine can maintain 3500 rpm under heavy load, then there is usable power differences. Under 3400 RPM, I don't see how an EFI is better.

The throttle response to load may be quicker on an EFI engine, but not by much. The governor is electrically operated. It is implied that the operation of the governor is the same as a carburator engine. Unless Ariens reveal how electric governor actually works and response curves, I am not convinced that different is better.

There may be placebo effect from users of new technology and running a shiny new Ariens. If it is not scientifically measured and documented, it didn't happen. Also, showing graphs without citing test methods aren't scientific, it is more anecdotal seat of the pants warm fuzzy feeling.

I know better generators use electric governors, but the fact that many use a mechanical one and it's "good enough" I'm pretty convinced a snowblower would literally never benefit from an electric one. It doesn't mean the electric governor isn't better, but I don't see it being better in this application. A generator is far more demanding.
 

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So a carb'd 420 on the same size machine vs an EFI 420 and the EFI runs stronger and keeps the RPM up better?

My dad has told me several times his Hydropro 32 never bogs down and that's carb'ed with a B&S 420. He's said there's been times where the snow starts to pile in front of it and it starts to plow because the machine literally can't throw it fast enough but the engine has never showed any signs of not being able to keep up.

My 28 Pro has that 420 B&S engine and it certainly does bog down under heavy load. In this type of situation, I believe it is a HP limitation and not a fuel availability issue.
 

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I know better generators use electric governors, but the fact that many use a mechanical one and it's "good enough" I'm pretty convinced a snowblower would literally never benefit from an electric one. It doesn't mean the electric governor isn't better, but I don't see it being better in this application. A generator is far more demanding.
For snowplowing application where the load is generally constant, I don't see how quicker throttle response has any benefits. Maybe there is fuel efficiency advantage and preventing over-revving.
 

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Ariens makes good products. However, they typically over-market their technology and features. They used to be very cheesy in their marketing. It has gotten better although the Arien's attempt at EFI advantages for power and torque aren't that convincing. I'm not saying isn't better than carbureted engine, but nothing on their website is convincing me it is better. Zilch.

From the graph on their website, the hp and torque curves are almost identical, they are almost on top of one another. There may not be significant differences when it comes to actual performance. If the EFI engine can maintain 3500 rpm under heavy load, then there is usable power differences. Under 3400 RPM, I don't see how an EFI is better.

The throttle response to load may be quicker on an EFI engine, but not by much. The governor is electrically operated. It is implied that the operation of the governor is the same as a carburator engine. Unless Ariens reveal how electric governor actually works and response curves, I am not convinced that different is better.

There may be placebo effect from users of new technology and running a shiny new Ariens. If it is not scientifically measured and documented, it didn't happen. Also, showing graphs without citing test methods aren't scientific, it is more anecdotal seat of the pants warm fuzzy feeling.
well sir you are wrong
efi might still have issues
but i used one and its so responsive it feels like it wasnt the 306cc but more like my 414cc 28 inch
it sure felt like it carried the torque a few hundred more rpm unlike the carb thats the efi doing its thing
my 28 414 with impeller kit and the new jet @3950 blows snow over my house into the backyard now
the efi flat out is better they do have issues prolly mostly bad owners but still new
 

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The electric governor is used a lot on diesel powered cranes and
drag lines and other heavy machinery.

The pilot operated controls for the hydraulic circuits are what controls
everything and if I remember my operating sequences right the oil flow
volume on the various functions controls the diesel engine and lets it
run wide open to full engine rpm for the full hydraulic systems valves
for full oil flow no matter the circuit.
The added benefit is the diesel engine will return to idle every time a function is
stopped.
 

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So a carb'd 420 on the same size machine vs an EFI 420 and the EFI runs stronger and keeps the RPM up better?

My dad has told me several times his Hydropro 32 never bogs down and that's carb'ed with a B&S 420. He's said there's been times where the snow starts to pile in front of it and it starts to plow because the machine literally can't throw it fast enough but the engine has never showed any signs of not being able to keep up.
I have two strong machines, one carbed and one EFI. And I just sold a 9.5 hp carbed Yamaha. The EFI instantly keeps the revs up while carbed goes down a little in revs and then adjusts. I am not sure if this is important at all. But there is a difference. All engines can bog down if there is enough restistance. I believe under constant super heavy load, you might have a small advantage with EFI. But it seems like no one wants to hear about it here ;)
 

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well sir you are wrong
efi might still have issues
but i used one and its so responsive it feels like it wasnt the 306cc but more like my 414cc 28 inch
it sure felt like it carried the torque a few hundred more rpm unlike the carb thats the efi doing its thing
my 28 414 with impeller kit and the new jet @3950 blows snow over my house into the backyard now
the efi flat out is better they do have issues prolly mostly bad owners but still new
It is still a "feels like" and "felt like". The impeller mods and new jet doesn't not help the comparison as far as apples to apples.

Maybe the quicker throttle response makes it feels like it is stronger to changing loads. However, does that mean that it can move more metric tons of snow per hour at constant load?
 

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You won't see turbos on small snow blowers unless they are
three cylinder air cooled diesels with indirect or direct injection
as the turbocharger is mounted on the exhaust manifold as a rule
to allow easier placement of the intake and pressure piping for the
air inlet.
 

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I have two strong machines, one carbed and one EFI. And I just sold a 9.5 hp carbed Yamaha. The EFI instantly keeps the revs up while carbed goes down a little in revs and then adjusts. I am not sure if this is important at all. But there is a difference. All engines can bog down if there is enough restistance. I believe under constant super heavy load, you might have a small advantage with EFI. But it seems like no one wants to hear about it here ;)
I do want to hear about it here.
 

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Maybe the quicker throttle response makes it feels like it is stronger to changing loads. However, does that mean that it can move more metric tons of snow per hour at constant load?
Not according to Ariens, the Platinum 24 SHO is reported to move 73 tons of snow per hour for both the carb and EFI model.

Platinum Series Snow Blower - Ariens
 

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It is still a "feels like" and "felt like". The impeller mods and new jet doesn't not help the comparison as far as apples to apples.

Maybe the quicker throttle response makes it feels like it is stronger to changing loads. However, does that mean that it can move more metric tons of snow per hour at constant load?
you dont think i use my machine prior to those mods if the efi feels close to my mods that means its even better not worse
the efi feels like it has a 414 cc its flat out better
it has more torque at 3600 and it stays at 3600 because the efi keeps the air fuel perfect and the gov is lighting quick
the carb cant do that
that said i would want to have to take it to a dealer they are clueless
ill take the carb
efi is still WAY better apples to apples
 

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It responds faster when hitting resistance. Click at the link and scroll down a little, you can see the difference in power and torque to the carburated engine same size.https://www.ariens.com/en-us/info/efi-ez-launch
It should be noted that the Pro 420 EFI runs at 3,650 rpm while the Pro 420 carburetted version is set for 3,600 rpm. The identified chart seems to show an improvement due to the higher governed rpm. My Pro 420 carburetted engine runs at 3,600 rpm or within 20 rpm of that number under light snow conditions. So not a level playing field for comparison.

The second aspect is the tons per hour. Only the EFI 36 inch Pro can achieve 102 tons per hour. All other models are no higher than 90 tons per hour depending on bucket width. The EFI versions and the carburetted versions of the Pro 420 engine have the same 90 tons per hour for same bucket size.
 
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