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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have recently re-engine my 1970's Ariens 10/32" with a 15 hp engine from princess Auto (Canada's harbor freight) 15 HP 420cc OHV Winter Gas Engine | Princess Auto

I want to add a light to it, but I'm not sure what kind of power I am dealing with? From what I have read, it appears most snowblower engines put out AC power. The lighting connector coming from the engine has two wires on it. There is a tag on the two wires coming off the engine and it says:

"DC:36W/12V
AC:60W/12V"

I checked it with my multimeter while it was running at full RPM and my meter showed 42V on the AC setting and 19V when switched to the DC setting on the multimeter.

Is this AC or DC power coming off this engine?
 

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Holeshot
If you have a lighting connector coming from your engine, it is AC. The coil puts out DC for the spark plug, but a small "alternator" assembly provides AC for lighting and other accessories on some engines. MH
 

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I would think it has both, AC & DC volts out....Best to use the ac with higher wattage for the lamp...or use LED lamps..The DC output would be for charging a lead acid battery if it were aboard....This is just my thoughts,,, as I do not own one..
 

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There is a tag on the two wires coming off the engine and it says:

"DC:36W/12V
AC:60W/12V"

I checked it with my multimeter while it was running at full RPM and my meter showed 42V on the AC setting and 19V when switched to the DC setting on the multimeter.

Is this AC or DC power coming off this engine?
It is very odd that you read DC and AC from the same wire?
Normally one wire would be DC only and AC only on the other.
Nevertheless the voltage is way too high if you want to run LED as is.
Does it show (in manual) having a voltage regulator?
If you still want to add Led light better check this thread:
http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/general-snowblower-discussion/6602-upgrading-your-snowblower-lights-led-lights.html

Your AC is suited for hand warmers.
Good Luck
 

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Discussion Starter #5
 

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Agree with above, I had DC and AC and the DC side had dirty voltage and cost me a $50.00 LED light, lesson learned.
 

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I'm confused...Holeshot said he had a tag on "TWO" wires...that listed DC and ac ratings...can we assume he's measuring on each wire? Of course, the dc will be dirty 1/2 wave...and subject to engines rpm.....maybe just use simple incandescent bulbs..!
 

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I'm confused...Holeshot said he had a tag on "TWO" wires...that listed DC and ac ratings...can we assume he's measuring on each wire? Of course, the dc will be dirty 1/2 wave...and subject to engines rpm.....maybe just use simple incandescent bulbs..!
I read it as two different wires, so adding a capacitor (like I stated in the LED upgrade thread) would be a good idea for peace of mind.
Incandescent doesn't hold a candle to LED brightness, light up the night with LED floodlights!:D
 

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If you refer to the manual that is either with that engine or online, there are 2 electrical wires coming from the engine..the red is DC, the yellow is AC. I would hook lighting up to the DC wire, as that is the same as what is used in the automotive type lighting..

Now my question...WHY the AC?? what is ac power used for on an engine/automotive application??
 

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If you refer to the manual that is either with that engine or online, there are 2 electrical wires coming from the engine..the red is DC, the yellow is AC. I would hook lighting up to the DC wire, as that is the same as what is used in the automotive type lighting..
Now my question...WHY the AC?? QUOTE]

I think it is an issue with cost since DC is a refined voltage but refined to what degree? that is the ultimate question. AC needs less electrical components so it can be used for incandescent lights and or hand warmers.
On Snow Blowers the coil output quality is based on cost so the ones that used 12 volts starters needed DC to charge the battery costing more and those who only need AC for lights and or hand warmers costing less.
 

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Automotive incandescent lighting is both AC and DC. That little filament doesn't care what you supply it with. Same as on the lawn and garden stuff. You can connect the incandescent bulb to either wire (yellow or red) from your snowblower and it will light up.

Once you get into LED it has to be DC and it had to be polarity specific. An LED is a diode so it only works one way and positive has to go to positive.

The stator produces AC and without anything else that's what you have and that's why it's cheaper than adding components to convert the AC to DC. So on machines that didn't come with LED lighting or battery start it's cheaper to have a stator pumping out AC to run a cheap lamp.

On your yellow AC lead you can always use a pre-made rectifier to give you DC if you don't want to order the parts and assemble yourself.

https://www.superbrightleds.com/moreinfo/battery-and-cps-compact-power-supplies/12v-ac-to-dc-converter-module/1725/

 
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