Snowblower Forum banner
21 - 37 of 37 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,574 Posts
Don't Think You Can Even Get Motor Brushes 4 That. I Got 1 And When It Goes It Goes Not Going To Worry About Replacing Anything On It. I Don't Use It Much Anyway Since I Hate Fighting That BLOODY FREAKING Extension Cord Any Way. Depending On Where You Live I Will Sell You Mine Real Cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Push-nuts are one time use, and need to be pried off. Try using a paint can opener ($1).

The things are just too recessed into the plastic wheels to get anything under the rim of the push nut edges, unless there was some dedicated purpose tool for it. I can grab it with vise grips with decent pressure, but it's got a tenacious hold on the axle and the dome is too slippery to get much pulling force on it. I was trading off between too little force and having it slip back off, or maybe too much force and causing the spring clips inside to grip even tighter. I suppose I can try drilling through or using a Dremel attack, but cutting the plastic cover seems so inviting I'm inclined to take the easier way out.
It shouldn't really be visible afterwards anyway since it's on the bottom under the wheels. No consideration for resale anyway, as I'll be its very last owner:p
Don't Think You Can Even Get Motor Brushes 4 That. I Got 1 And When It Goes It Goes Not Going To Worry About Replacing Anything On It. I Don't Use It Much Anyway Since I Hate Fighting That BLOODY FREAKING Extension Cord Any Way. Depending On Where You Live I Will Sell You Mine Real Cheap.
It definitely has to be used with a good low temperature extension cord, if it's one of the regular cords that set up with rigor mortis in the cold, it just can't be used. With the cord I have, even at sub zero, I can flick the cord over to one side of the path and out of the way. The cord was pricey but necessary for this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,550 Posts
Push-nuts are one time use, and need to be pried off.
I can't tell you how many push-nuts I've reused. Grab them with locking pliers and twist back and forth while pulling. Use a very small flat-blade screw driver to bend the "teeth" back out slightly to prepare them for reuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Grab them with locking pliers
I've tried that on both sides, but because of the restricted access, can only get the needle nose Vise Grips on there. Even cranking up the pressure and locking on, I can't even get them to spin while holding the axle with my Knipex pliers wrench. If the hockey puck plastic wheels had just a bit more clearance on the recess, I could get a regular sized vise grip on there, but the wheels were designed to prevent that. They could have made the wheels without any recess and it would have been functionally equivalent, but where's the fun in that?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #29 · (Edited)
Just Cut The Shaft In Two. Get A New Rod For It. Run A Die On The New Shaft 4 Threads Put Some Nylocks With Washers On It. And Be Done With Your NightMare.
That's probably the easiest option. I was originally considering that, but didn't want to do that before seeing what I missed.
I could also just cut threads on the cut shaft and use a coupling nut to join it back.
It'd be very lightly loaded there, so it wouldn't need much to hold it together. I probably could even just yee haw tape it together with a splint.🌝
I'll give it one more try getting one of those push nuts to release their 30 year hold first.

Looking at it further, I probably won't cut the cover because that might leave the outer flap unsupported, although the cover does very little aside from cosmetics anyway. The snow freely passes through the vents to get to the motor, so it's not sealing anything. When I opened it up it was pretty well packed with snow, right where all the electrical bits are. Probably the only thing that kept it from corroding even quicker is that snow is just water after it melts. If it's used at the driveway edge with the salted snow that the plows push up, that may accelerate the deterioration of the contacts though-
I may tape over the vents, and remove it only when I snow blow in the summertime 🙃

Still waiting for the generic brushes I ordered to come in, so no hurry-
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #32 ·
The screws seem to develop quite a bit of corrosion, and I was worried about it stripping when I went to remove them, but luckily they all still were good enough to remove without incident. I guess they weren't too bad considering the 30 years, but I'm going to spritz them all with WD-40 or similar to minimize further corrosion.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
If you end up trying to thread a steel replacement axle, make sure that the steel isn't pickled or otherwise case hardened. Else the die will hardly make a mark on it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #34 ·
If you end up trying to thread a steel replacement axle, make sure that the steel isn't pickled or otherwise case hardened. Else the die will hardly make a mark on it.
That axle was pretty hard as you mentioned, the die didn't cut deeply enough to get a good secure fit with the coupler nut I got, but it's enough to keep the shaft from sliding back out, so it's workable. I'd weld it but I want to still be able to pull it through for future disassembly, so I'll leave it as it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
That axle was pretty hard as you mentioned, the die didn't cut deeply enough to get a good secure fit with the coupler nut I got, but it's enough to keep the shaft from sliding back out, so it's workable. I'd weld it but I want to still be able to pull it through for future disassembly, so I'll leave it as it is.
Surprised that the die did anything at all, if the shaft is case hardened. Likely you can buy a shaft off-the-shelf at a big-box home store if needed. They may sell both hardened and unhardened. Test with a file or hacksaw. You may be able to use shaft collars if the push nuts don't hold.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #36 ·
Stubborn persistence in getting some grooves in it.
It's holding well enough, and being so lightly loaded I don't think it's going to be a problem.
Just holds the thing off the floor with barely any weight on it.

It only has to keep from pulling out sideways from the coupler nut in the middle.
Right way is to replace the axle with single shaft, and cotter pin one side, but this will do.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #37 ·
The axle size was closest to 3/8" x 16 tpi and the fix was to apply a couple beads of weld to the end of the shaft, then thread it with the die. Now the coupler threads on securely and locks the two cut ends together.
I used the 3/8 - 16 tap to enlarge the mount holes, as there wasn't enough clearance to pass through with the enlarged ends.
 

Attachments

21 - 37 of 37 Posts
Top