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Discussion Starter #1
So I just picked up a brand new 24 platinum SHO and it came from the dealer with a full tank of gas and it’s gonna snow today and tomorrow so I’ll get use out of it. My question is the manual says to run fuel stabilizer in it for 5 min or so then shut the fuel switch off and let the motor die. Then it’s good for the summer. The dealer told me to drain every ounce of gas out of the machine and run it dry. Ariens directly told me to do the manual way. Is there a definitive yes or no on this. I’ve had snowblowers before but kind just ran them empty or forgot and I thankfully never had an issue but with this new purchase
I wanna make sure it lasts and I take care of the unit. Thanks you in advance for any responses
 

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When you get done with it 4 the year run the whole BLOODY thing Bone dry the tank, carb and lines. and leave it that way.:eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k:
 

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I've always run by blower dry at the end of the season (regardless of tank level). Some years running the blower dry is the only exercise it gets.
 

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When I'm done with blower I clean it off and shove it in the back of my shed and place a board under the bucket. Never have drained tanks. Have always used stabilized gasoline up to this past fall when a non E station opened. I just did get my blowers out of storage last evening and the Toro started 1st pull and the Airens Sno Tek started with just a touch of the electric starter. I dunno... This method has never failed me yet. JMHO.
 

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You are going to get a mix of opinions on this, it is so divided that I feel no one is right and you have to do what you think is right!

Now my opinion, I feel strongly that if you have a metal tank, you leave fuel in there, topped off with stabilizer added. If you have a plastic tank I'm divided but prefer to add stabilizer, run the machine, then drain the tank and fuel bowl, and try to start it to run any gas out of the carb. Some will drain the tank and run until the machine stops. However I also add a fuel cleaner to the gas can.
 

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Personally, for anything that's going to be stored for a while, it gets stabilizer, run for a few minutes and the tank topped off before storage. Oil gets changed before storage and a little light oil in the cylinder(s) to protect against surface rust from moisture. On that final shutdown before the oil change, I'd shut off the fuel valve and let it run the carb dry.

When it's time to re-activate for the next season, pull the spark plug(s), spin it over to force out any excess fogging oil, clean or replace the plug and start it up.

As long as you're not in a situation where the fuel tank is likely to collect a lot of condensation (which it shouldn't if it's full), I see no issue with storing something with a full tank of stabilized fuel. I've seen plenty of boats running on year-old ethanol containing fuel (with stabilizer) with no issues. With ethanol fuel, as long as it doesn't absorb enough moisture to cause separation, any water will be harmlessly absorbed and run right through (just like adding dry-gas to non-ethanol fuel to absorb any moisture in the tank).
 

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Discussion Starter #7
You are going to get a mix of opinions on this, it is so divided that I feel no one is right and you have to do what you think is right!

Now my opinion, I feel strongly that if you have a metal tank, you leave fuel in there, topped off with stabilizer added. If you have a plastic tank I'm divided but prefer to add stabilizer, run the machine, then drain the tank and fuel bowl, and try to start it to run any gas out of the carb. Some will drain the tank and run until the machine stops. However I also add a fuel cleaner to the gas can.
So you leave the tank full? I was going to fill the tank with fuel and stabilizer and shut the fuel off and let whatever is in the carb burn off and let the machine die on it’s own
 

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So you leave the tank full? I was going to fill the tank with fuel and stabilizer and shut the fuel off and let whatever is in the carb burn off and let the machine die on it’s own
If it's a metal tank it's full with the shut off valve off and stabilizer added. The rest of what you said is fine.
 

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There is no definitive right/wrong on this. Fuel stabilizer should keep the fuel usable during summer layup . . . but if there is no fuel in it then no worries about the fuel aging and causing problems in the fall.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So you leave the tank full? I was going to fill the tank with fuel and stabilizer and shut the fuel off and let whatever is in the carb burn off and let the machine die on it’s own
If it's a metal tank it's full with the shut off valve off and stabilizer added. The rest of what you said is fine.
It is a metal tank and the ariens manual said the same thing you did
 

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with this new purchase I wanna make sure it lasts and I take care of the unit.

Draining dry takes longer but it is the best method.

If you dont have a lot of free time, follow the manual's recomendation.

I'd bet Ariens used to say to run it dry but people would put it off, or forget, and then have problems.

Adding and running-in Seafoam or Sta-bil is much easier

.
 

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You can add stabilizer to your fuel cans when filling them. That way they are always ready for storage. A couple ounces for 5 gallons is cheap insurance . Just a thought and the route I went while trying to be as efficient as possible and protecting my equipment.
 

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You can add stabilizer to your fuel cans when filling them. That way they are always ready for storage. A couple ounces for 5 gallons is cheap insurance . Just a thought and the route I went while trying to be as efficient as possible and protecting my equipment.
Agreed. Fuel for snowblowers, mowers, etc. should be stabilized right when you put it into the can. That way if you have a mild winter or something and have fuel sitting around for a few months, it's not a concern.
 

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The fuel stabilizer I use is Stabil-360. Seafoam is good stuff but not a true stabilizer. I have used both before. But for many of the machines, I have left untreated fuel in there for up to a year without use and it has started up just fine when the time comes. Oh sure it doesn't smell too good but ah well. This year I'm going to run the tanks dry on all the church machines.
 

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I'll add my confusion....I do exactly what J Lawrence does. I add Seafoam and MARINE Stabil to all my gas Tanks on fill ups. Every machine gets that mix. In the past I've run them dry, but with the cheap steel in the gas tanks now, They rust from the inside out. That rust always finds it's way to the carb. So now everything is stored full.

GLuck, J
 

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When you get done with it 4 the year run the whole BLOODY thing Bone dry the tank, carb and lines. and leave it that way.:eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k::eek:k:
I used to just as you suggest and every $%^& winter when I needed it for snow removal, I had carburetor trouble. And no,I do not use stabilizers. So a couple of years ago I just put the thing away using the key to shut it down along with the gas shut off left in the on position.

Since then, no more carburetor problems. Not preaching here at all, just sharing my experience
 
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