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Hi, I just used my HS1132 and saw engine oil coming out a hole on right side of engine case (see photos). What I found on the web is that hole is for the engine oil level switch and I think some models simply don't have it cause I saw absolutly no free connector or cut wire near that hole so...
I checked on Honda snowblowers parts suppliers web pages but found nothing. I found something in the shop manual and made a screen shot (included).
My engine is a GX340.
Does anybody know about a plug for that hole when we don't have a switch? A part number? Anything that could help?
I can't use my snowblower as long as it stays like that :(

Thank's
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I found something else. Apparently they all had the oil level switch and mine had it removed (i bought my snowblower used at the end of last winter) and they left the hole opened or the wire had been cut, I lost the nut and the connector fell inside :(
 

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dealer may have plug otherwise you could fashion one.in a pinch . or use a golf tee if it will stay in LOL. perhaps you could tap the hole and use a carb bolt with rubber seal washer.

honda snowblower engines don't have the oil switch ( I haven't seen any on over 250 I have worked on ) for some reason but the generator engines do.
 

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Thank's you are giving me hope !!! I tought I would have to open the engine to put back the connector at it's place. **** :(


Altought it will take a huge golf tee cause the hole is around 3/8 of an inch lol
 

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What I found on the web is that hole is for the engine oil level switch and I think some models simply don't have it cause I saw absolutly no free connector or cut wire near that hole so...
I checked on Honda snowblowers parts suppliers web pages but found nothing.
Snowblower engines don't have oil level switches, since they get tilted when in use. You are expected to check the oil level before each use. The level switch is used in stationary applications like generators and pumps.

I found something in the shop manual and made a screen shot (included).
My engine is a GX340. Does anybody know about a plug for that hole when we don't have a switch? A part number?
@HS1132928 and @orangputeh I think the plug is probably a press-in when the engine is not being used in an application that can support an oil level sensor.

The float switch is mounted inside the crankcase and has a 10mm hollow bolt containing the sensor wire that comes out through that hole with a 10mm flange nut on the outside. I think you'll have to open it up and put a 10mm bolt through there with fiber washers to seal it.
 

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Snowblower engines don't have oil level switches, since they get tilted when in use. You are expected to check the oil level before each use. The level switch is used in stationary applications like generators and pumps.


I'll search for a plug...
good to finally know why they don't have them. get asked that question every once in awhile. I'd think the dealer would have that plug .

what do you think he could use inthe meantime @tabora?
 

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I will try to find something to plug the hole from the outside cause its a heck of a job to open the case ot plug that 🤬
 

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I will try to find something to plug the hole from the outside cause its a heck of a job to open the case ot plug that 🤬
Carefully measure the outer diameter of that hole and get a freeze plug of that diameter and use a hammer and dowel to seat it in there, perhaps after coating it with some Permatex?

Oh, and make sure your crankcase breather hose is clear; something caused that plug to pop out...
 

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I'm surprised the hole was drilled out. Snowblowers didn't use the oil level switch, only the generator engines used the oil level switch.
Almost wonder if the engine block was replaced with a generator engine block because the regular engine blocks have the casting built in them for the oil pressure switch but they are not drilled out for it unless it was used for the generator application.
There were some engines that used a black rubber plug in the blocks to plug the hole if it was drilled and not used.
Honda part # 90801ZE2003 is the 10mm rubber plug for the block with the drilled out hole.
 

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I'm surprised the hole was drilled out. Snowblowers didn't use the oil level switch, only the generator engines used the oil level switch.
Almost wonder if the engine block was replaced with a generator engine block because the regular engine blocks have the casting built in them for the oil pressure switch but they are not drilled out for it unless it was used for the generator application.
There were some engines that used a black rubber plug in the blocks to plug the hole if it was drilled and not used.
Honda part # 90801ZE2003 is the 10mm rubber plug for the block with the drilled out hole.
all the honda snowblower engines i have seen has that plug. tabora's suggestion is excellent. if you have a dealer nearby I'm sure they have a plug .

Honda makes all the engines the same way for different applications. same reason there are 2 oil caps. people always asking me why 2 oil caps? it's because so you can fill and or check from either side because in a generator or other application you may not be able to get to one side .
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I'm surprised the hole was drilled out. Snowblowers didn't use the oil level switch, only the generator engines used the oil level switch.
Almost wonder if the engine block was replaced with a generator engine block because the regular engine blocks have the casting built in them for the oil pressure switch but they are not drilled out for it unless it was used for the generator application.
There were some engines that used a black rubber plug in the blocks to plug the hole if it was drilled and not used.
Honda part # 90801ZE2003 is the 10mm rubber plug for the block with the drilled out hole.
Your theory makes sense. I ordered the plug at the Honda dealer and I will have it tomorrow. I will do the necessary for it to stay in place.
Thank's
 

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Your theory makes sense. I ordered the plug at the Honda dealer and I will have it tomorrow. I will do the necessary for it to stay in place.
Thank's
Some of those plugs might go from the inside to out, so you have to remove the rear crankcase cover to get to it, then if that is the case, you might find the plug laying inside the block.
They would do it that way to keep the plug from blowing out from crankcase pressure build-up and oil splashing up against it.
Either way, good luck with it and let us know how you make out with it.
You have to be careful if you coat the plug with a silicon sealer because that will make it slippery, and it can fall back out. They make a special adhesive for them that a good Honda dealer should have.
 

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Drain the oil. Clean the hole out with a gentle bit of electronics cleaner and a shop towel. Then JB weld or PC-7 to block it off. That stuff should never vibrate loose again. Just a thought but some Honda part was in there before and worked it’s way out. Not my idea of fun finding a seized up engine in a snowstorm. Just a suggestion. Maybe a small engine mechanic can tell me why this wouldn’t work.
 

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Another way (my mind never stops thinking about this stuff once I read it and start thinking about it) would be to tap the block and get a correct sized bolt to fit as a plug with the right kind of loctite. Or put in a Time-Sert and a plug if your concerned about the soft metal and vibration. You could even put in a Drainzit with the thread insert if the boss is low enough on the block. Once again, someone correct me if I am crazy.

So endeth my rant.
 

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even if that rubber plug fell in the crankcase would it be a huge concern? It would just get all chewed up . I'd change the oil and then clean the hole and install a new rubber plug with the proper adhesive , whatever that may be.

but that's just me.
 

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O.P. it would just bounce around and get chewed up with no damage except for running the engine low in oil if that happened.
The adhesive would be a good gasket adhesive, "Permatex" makes that and Honda used to also sell it with their own brand of chemicals available to their dealers.
Some of those plugs were installed from the inside so they wouldn't blow out of the crankcase from any crankcase pressure that normally builds up inside the case when the engine is running.
There is a little pressure that builds up even though the breather is working properly, but its not a whole lot of pressure unless the breather fails, then the pressure would increase, which is very rare unless you have some severe blow-by somehow, like bad rings, hole in the piston or blown head gasket, and in those cases you would know there is an engine problem that needs attention.
Otherwise, just repair it like you mentioned and it should be good to go again.
There is a possibility that someone could have poked or pushed it into the crankcase with an object like a screw driver, not knowing what it was or vandalized it, they don't fall out on their own normally.
 
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