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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

So first of all, thanks for all the help in my earlier thread about my broken Tecumseh engine on my Yard Man. I found a replacement engine - I'm replacing my HMSK90 with an HMSK85

I got the HMSK90 off. To do so I put it in service position, and undid three bolts. Then tilted it back on the handles and undid the fourth bolt, so the engine fell off but was caught by the handles.

Now, usually "installation is the reverse of removal" - but not in this case, since I had to let the engine fall off to get it off.

I know this must be a problem somebody else has run into, but I didn't see anything when I did a Google search on the topic.

So - how do I bolt down my new engine? All I can think of is to have a friend come over and hold it in place while I do up the first two bolts. But I'd rather go it alone if only I can figure out how. Plus, most of my friends are pretty weak.

I thought about stacking a bunch of bricks and setting the machine on top but this seems dangerous - I'm about as wide as the machine so I could see myself knocking the bricks over with my shoulders and getting squished.

So, any ideas on how to bolt down an engine that bolts in from below with just one person?

Thanks!
 

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Just lay on your back and get the first bolt up through one hole with one hand and get that first nut started with the other hand .. I just did that one at a time with mine. You might need a long pair of needle nose pliers I had to do that with one of mine because I couldn't put my fingers in . Make sure the engine is perfectly square on the frame double check them after tightening a couple and tighten them all down. Do not tilt the machine when you're a bolting down your new engine keep everything flat.
 

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Maybe get some long bolts or screwdrivers down through the holes on top to get her started and then top it up. I think with mine I put the bolt on the end of a long ratchet extension and come from the bottom, but mine used nuts on top and not a threaded block.
 

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I guess I'm baffled here also. Remove the old bolts/nuts on the flat and replace the same. I would never take an engine off in the service position and can't imagine a need to do so. Even if your block is threaded and you have to come from underneath with bolts, use a short extension and eyeball the top holes with a flashlight???
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Try a ratchet tie down strap? Are you serious? Don't get under the machine with bricks supporting it!!
Hank
Yeah, the ratchet strap is a good idea if I can make it work. I'll give that a shot.


Just lay on your back and get the first bolt up through one hole with one hand and get that first nut started with the other hand .. I just did that one at a time with mine. You might need a long pair of needle nose pliers I had to do that with one of mine because I couldn't put my fingers in . Make sure the engine is perfectly square on the frame double check them after tightening a couple and tighten them all down. Do not tilt the machine when you're a bolting down your new engine keep everything flat.

I can't really reach in there - the opening is a square on the bottom and it's pretty close to the ground. Plus with the chain and axel in there, is a convoluted path to the mounting nuts that requires a couple of extensions and a U-joint. I'd need to see what's going on to thread through and get the socket on.

Maybe get some long bolts or screwdrivers down through the holes on top to get her started and then top it up. I think with mine I put the bolt on the end of a long ratchet extension and come from the bottom, but mine used nuts on top and not a threaded block.
That's a good suggestion. But I took a look and there's protrusions in the block casting hanging over the bolt holes, so I can't get anything in from the top.
 

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Put the bolts through and use tinnerman nuts to hold them there, set the engine on, put the regular nuts on and then you can tighten everything up.

Tinnerman nut:

 

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You can't just set the new engine on and see bolt holes to line up? Stick a new bolt in one hand and feather it through? These aren't aircraft, so if I sound crass, I don't mean to be. 90 % of your perceived problems aligning could be overcome by moving the shifter lever and moving the friction wheel.
Stick a bolt through and if you have short arms or can't reach all four, do one at a time and snag the "up bolt" with a clamp or even a piece of tape. Once you get one, the rest can't escape:D
 

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I agree -- all you need to do is get two of the bolts and nuts started. When I did this recently, I put the rear end up on my ramps, which allowed me to lay down and thread the nuts onto the bolts. But, a very good idea is the tinnerman nuts, which hold the bolt up. Then all ya got to do is carefully place the block down onto the threaded studs.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
You can't just set the new engine on and see bolt holes to line up? Stick a new bolt in one hand and feather it through? These aren't aircraft, so if I sound crass, I don't mean to be. 90 % of your perceived problems aligning could be overcome by moving the shifter lever and moving the friction wheel.
Stick a bolt through and if you have short arms or can't reach all four, do one at a time and snag the "up bolt" with a clamp or even a piece of tape. Once you get one, the rest can't escape:D
If I had an extra elbow and six inches more arm, that might work.
 

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Have not seen those before, I believe that is an excellent idea ! :cool:
Go to your local auto parts store or farm supply and you should be able to find them. If you've ever changed a front tire on a newer vehicle with a rotor that's separate from the hub, you've likely seen them on the wheel studs and may not have known what they were. After the rotor is on the hub during vehicle assembly they'll stick 2 or 3 on to hold it in place while everything else is assembled.
 
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