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I've been looking at old and new snowblowers, thinking about how designs have evolved over the past thirty years or so. Things I have noticed (talking 2-stage machines)

Serrated augers. (Does this really make a difference?)

Taller chutes (Very easy to see the point of this.)

Smaller diameter augers.

Safer controls. (Some of the older control schemes are rather strange and obviously unsafe....)

Mechanical simplicity. (I was looking at an MTD carcass, comparing it with the Ariens I'm building up. Say what you will about MTD, they seem to have reduced the machine to it's mechanical essentials--way fewer pieces than the Ariens.....)

Higher power to width ratio and overhead valve engines. (True of most types of equipment and power tools....)

lighter gauge materials, moe plastic, cable controls, etc (As many note all the time.)

Plastic skids pretty common.

How all this nets out in blowing snow I don't know.

Thoughts?
 

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Certainly cuts down on weight!!!! Older/heavier machines Eat the snow,,,,,lighter machines will spin tires and ride On the snow. ...good for shipping and CEO Bonus'. Don't last as long....Ditto for fat cat CEO's. I'm sure there's many more Dis/Advantages.....Jay
 

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Good point I learned to just leave my 2410 TB in first gear and let it eat away. If it rides up no problem I just back up and make a second pass. Less stress on the macine and my butt.
 

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I find the Powder coating on new machines unsatisfactory. And when it starts to peel, it makes refinishing all the harder. Give me old fashioned enamel PAINT any day. MH
 

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I find the Powder coating on new machines unsatisfactory. And when it starts to peel, it makes refinishing all the harder. Give me old fashioned enamel PAINT any day. MH
As far as I know, Powder coating hasn't been a problem on snowblowers for 35 years..
When it was first tried, it wasn't done right, and there were some major peeling problems.
Some Ariens models from the early 1980's are known for having this problem.

but, the problem was quickly discovered and quickly corrected..the Ariens models I know of are only one, maybe two, model years at most.
I believe Ariens just went back to regular paint after that.

Its possible some manufacturers are still using powder-coating..MTD perhaps? but im not sure.
But as far as I know, the issues and problems with powder-coating were corrected decades ago.

Scot
 

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As far as I know, Powder coating hasn't been a problem on snowblowers for 35 years..
When it was first tried, it wasn't done right, and there were some major peeling problems.
Some Ariens models from the early 1980's are known for having this problem.

but, the problem was quickly discovered and quickly corrected..the Ariens models I know of are only one, maybe two, model years at most.
I believe Ariens just went back to regular paint after that.

Its possible some manufacturers are still using powder-coating..MTD perhaps? but im not sure.
But as far as I know, the issues and problems with powder-coating were corrected decades ago.

Scot
Scot I pmd yesterday,but not sure if you got it.i sent it from my phone
 

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JayzAuto1 hit the nail right on the head, the only reason for any ''evolution'' in any fabrication of anything these days is to have the most efficient cost in manufacturing and accommodate transportation, due to the fact that most of our manufactured items (here in the Americas) are made overseas, packaged and sent to our continent to be assembled as engines, tools, parts of tools or parts of machines. Sad but true.


As for the additional luxuries added on these newer snowblowers is nothing more than a sales pitch IMO(talking about luxuries here not upgrades to fix a hiccup), because the bottom line, they throw snow the same way the old machines did, and for some, they don't do it as good as before, and some don't last as long as they once did. Of course the TLC giving owner will sure cure the newer machine lifespan some, as anything that is manufactured.


my 2 cents
 

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Random thoughts in BOLD below.
Pete
Serrated augers. (Does this really make a difference?)
Mostly a gimmick, it may have marginal value in EOD but only to offset the lack of inherent weight etc. May also be a multitude of weak points.

Taller chutes (Very easy to see the point of this.)
Visibility isn't the point. Longer and smaller chutes release a better snow stream for distance and control.

Smaller diameter augers.
No conceivable upside for the owner/user.

Safer controls. (Some of the older control schemes are rather strange and obviously unsafe....)
A rose amount thorns. Early models had no interlocks except perhaps a dead man reverse. In the mid 70's electrical kill interlocks were added. Circa 1980 machines were redesigned to be mechanically safety clutched. It does make machines tougher to run but it's all good. Some schemes are easier to live with than others.

Mechanical simplicity. (I was looking at an MTD carcass, comparing it with the Ariens I'm building up. Say what you will about MTD, they seem to have reduced the machine to it's mechanical essentials--way fewer pieces than the Ariens.....)
Ariens isn't stupid but I haven't been in these machine to know more.


Higher power to width ratio and overhead valve engines. (True of most types of equipment and power tools....)
Power is good!

lighter gauge materials, moe plastic, cable controls, etc (As many note all the time.)
All unfortunate

Plastic skids pretty common.
Cool for those with white concrete driveways. More forward resistance pushing the blocks into the snow.

How all this nets out in blowing snow I don't know.
Smaller/longer chutes and HP are winners. The rest is downside for performance and/or longevity.

Thoughts?
 
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