Snowblower Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My Ariens 28 sho arrives tues. New to blowers and very excited to throw my first white rooster tail.

Couple questions about fuel, break-in, and oil.

1. Fuel and storage

I found a shell station near me that sells 91 ethanol free, so I plan to run that. Should I run a fuel stabilizer as well? I’m gonna get a new 2.5 gallon can and try to use it in 4-6 weeks. If not, dump it in my car and get fresh. Can cars handle stabil or a similar stabilizer? I here a lot of conflicting advise about draining the tank in spring or leaving it full with stabilizer.

2. Oil, break-in, and grease

From what I’ve read, it seems like most folks run the original oil for 5hrs and change to synthetic. I have always used Mobil 1 in cars. Should I idle the engine for an hour or 2 before I start moving snow? Would it be better to do a break in and change the oil before blowing?

Lastly, do I need to hit the zerks before I use it? Or is everything greased up for the first season?

Oh yeah, and do you guys use chute lube? (huh-huh) I was gonna try the Ariens stuff.

Any advice Appreciated
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
My Ariens 28 sho arrives tues. New to blowers and very excited to throw my first white rooster tail.

Couple questions about fuel, break-in, and oil.

1. Fuel and storage

I found a shell station near me that sells 91 ethanol free, so I plan to run that. Should I run a fuel stabilizer as well? I’m gonna get a new 2.5 gallon can and try to use it in 4-6 weeks. If not, dump it in my car and get fresh. Can cars handle stabil or a similar stabilizer? I here a lot of conflicting advise about draining the tank in spring or leaving it full with stabilizer.
no to fuel stabilizer if using 91 ethanol free, and should be good for well over a year, some say for years.
but use the winter grade when its available, should be soon.
fuel stabilizers are needed if gas is not used for months due to ethanol water absorption which messes up the carbs and gunks up the fuel.
yes cars can handle fuel stabilizer.
ive never bought a new one so cant answer the other questions
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
1 hr no more then 2 hours put in 5w/30 full synthetic
readjust belts
tighten check all bolts
buy a cheap tach/hr meter

impeller kit
if you want to get the rpms up 250 to 300 move gov spring to outside hole
i would break it in pre snow
you could idle the throttle a few times if you wanted
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
250 Posts
1. Fuel and storage

I found a shell station near me that sells 91 ethanol free, so I plan to run that. Should I run a fuel stabilizer as well? I’m gonna get a new 2.5 gallon can and try to use it in 4-6 weeks. If not, dump it in my car and get fresh. Can cars handle stabil or a similar stabilizer? I here a lot of conflicting advise about draining the tank in spring or leaving it full with stabilizer.
Just to offer another alternative, I keep a supply of 'Trufuel' in my garage. It's 100% ethanol free and comes in 110oz tins. It remains usable for 2 years when opened and 5 years+ unopened. I get mine from Lowes. It's more expensive than sourcing ethanol free fuel at a petrol / gas station but the convenience factor is very high. It means I could run for several hours in a snowstorm if I got caught out without (stabilised) fuel in the garage. FAQ Trufuel link ay bottom of page.

I drained the fuel completely out of my engine at the end of last season, draining the whole syetem through the carb. Let the engine run out any remaining fuel and then switch the fuel line to 'off'.

I put about 2 quarts of Trufuel in my engine 2 weeks ago and it started up first time. That fuel will be OK now in my engine for at least 18 months / 2 years. I don't have to worry about fuel stabilisers nor asking myself how long has the fuel been in the engine, etc. Although I do keep written notes about what fuel I have added in Parker's log.

I'll then then keep 5 gallons of regular (with ethanol) fuel with stabiliser added in a container in the garage. If we get a snowfall, I can add this fuel to Parker if necessary.

Come the end of the season, if I don't use the stabilised 5 gallons, I'll empty it into my car. If Parker hasn't had stabilised fuel added to him during the season, I'll simply switch the fuel to 'off' and then then let the engine run any fuel out of the carb before storage. (Although with 'Trufuel' that last step isn't strictly necessary.)

If I have added stabilised fuel to Parker during the season, come the end of season I'll drain the whole system through the carb and put that fuel in my car.

That's my fuel storage system and it's the one I've also used for my Honda generator for many years. The only difference with the generator though is that I keep 10 gallons of stabilised fuel on hand through the whole year as storms / outtages can of course come at any time.

https://trufuel50.com/faqs/
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,202 Posts
Read your owners manual.
I don't see the need for stabilizer for non-E gas but it sure wouldn't hurt.
For chute lube I sometimes use cheap cooking spray because I'm cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,834 Posts
In terms of oil changes, I've heard suggestions to wait maybe 10 hours before going to synthetic oil. As I understand it, you want to use conventional oil while the piston rings are seating. *Then* go synthetic.

So changing the oil after an hour or 2, to remove any break-in metal, is a great idea. But I'd use conventional oil for at least that first change, and wait maybe 10 hours or so before going synthetic.

From some reading on engine break-in (hasn't been much of a research topic for me, I don't think I've bought any outdoor equipment new :) ), it sounds like you want to vary the load some, and don't just hammer the engine right away. So even if the first storm was a big one, maybe you go kinda slow, and/or take partial-width cuts, to avoid putting a constant, full load on the engine (the kind of load where it's slowing down, because it's out of power).

I'd still probably put stabilizer in the non-ethanol fuel, if I had stabilizer around. It can't hurt, and it's cheap insurance. If it has a fuel shutoff, you can run the carb dry at the end of each storm, if you want. I used to do that (with stabilized fuel), now I don't bother, I only run the carb dry at the end of the season. But running the carb dry should probably just mean another 1-2 pulls to start it the next time, so there isn't a big drawback to doing it each time, if you wanted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,740 Posts
In terms of oil changes, I've heard suggestions to wait maybe 10 hours before going to synthetic oil. As I understand it, you want to use conventional oil while the piston rings are seating. *Then* go synthetic.

So changing the oil after an hour or 2, to remove any break-in metal, is a great idea. But I'd use conventional oil for at least that first change, and wait maybe 10 hours or so before going synthetic.

From some reading on engine break-in (hasn't been much of a research topic for me, I don't think I've bought any outdoor equipment new :) ), it sounds like you want to vary the load some, and don't just hammer the engine right away. So even if the first storm was a big one, maybe you go kinda slow, and/or take partial-width cuts, to avoid putting a constant, full load on the engine (the kind of load where it's slowing down, because it's out of power).
^ this; you'll want to break it in with some snow load. that first oil change will look like a unicorn threw-up in the sump. I like to flush as much of the "glitter" out before going syn.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
Rings dont take that long to break in 5 hrs at most

not running a new motor 10 hrs without knowing whats in the sump 2 hrs max

might also check you gas tank for shavings from drilling of the holes many have shavings i removed mine with a magnet
if you change it at 2 hrs to take a look see then again at 5 hrs that would be smart if there was lil to nothing in it at 5 hrs you are set
if it was me id do 3 cycles warm it up 3 min 15 min on max 2 min on idle shut it off let cool off start it up max rpm 18 min 2 min on idle do that 1 more time and change the oil
then change it again at 5 hrs

I see no instrutions to break it in under load
since the lct has only 2 settings max and idle you w\ill have to varie the throttle
some lct have no throttle and get broken in at max rpm

Can someone show me where it says to break it in under load
you could wait the 5 hrs or 10 hrs and be fine

myself i would want the shat out of my engine quicker and then rechange the oil
its just and extra quart of oil
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,312 Posts
There are lots of theories for engine break in.

The one I abide by is to use conventional or blend oil on the new engine and put ~5 hours of loaded use on it. (Synthetic is actually too slippery for break in)

After that use what ever oil you choose.

You want the engine to be working during its first few hours. Load on the engine puts greater ring pressure on cylinder walls which nicely Hones the rings and cylinder into an optimal seal.

Low load early on will wear down the cylinders cross hatching without optimally bedding the rings.

The use of a high quality synthetic oil after break in is suggested to keep any further wear to a minimum and and maximize the effective life of the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,288 Posts
Theories and myths
synth is 2 slipperey
load helps seat the rings

low rpm will kill the cross hatch
synth will extend engine life
change oil after 1 hr
dont run hi rpms 1st few hrs
The only one i do for sure is change the oil for a look see




Engines are not built like they were in yesteyear
much tighter tolerances

when a new engine gets broken in on the dyno
they break the cam in then run it up to 5500 rpm and change the oil
the motors ive built break the cam [email protected] rpm then change the oil not wait 5 hrs because it doesnt have and oil pump
prolly wont matter on a small engine for 6 bucks snd 15 min time it would be worth it to me
breaking in with a load sounds good nonody knows to each there own
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
318 Posts
I emailed Ariens directly for you. The proper way to break in this engine is to run for five hours under normal conditions (blowing snow) then change the oil and you are done. Changing the oil before 5 hours is not recommended. More bad advice being given here sorry it happens.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Generally I go with moderate but not super heavy load and moderate RPM for engine break in. With something like a snowblower, avoiding full RPM for more than the first little bit isn't very practical, so I don't worry too much about it. For the most part, just don't baby it too much (like running it for hours without actually using it in snow to get load on it).

With an engine with no oil filter, I usually change the oil at about 2 hours, 5 hours, 10 hours and then pick up a normal schedule from there. There's no benefit to leaving break-in junk in there any longer than necessary.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
have not had the 28 sho delivered yet - does it come with an inline fuel filter and shut off? if not has anyone added them?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
654 Posts
End of season items:

Wash snowblower
Take wheels off & lubricate axles
Take bottom plate off clean and grease as necessary
With bottom plate off, inspect and look for damage
Check all cables and adjustments
take off cover for belt and inspects belts, pulleys and guides
add stabil and lucas fuel injector cleaner to gas and run engine for 10 minutes
Some will change the oil now or will change first thing in the fall
Some like to shut off fuel and run engine dry and then drain bowl. I personally don't do that
Spray auger housing and chute liberally with some type of protective coating.
You can pull plug and add small amount of oil in cylinder and hand pull engine to coat
pay close attention to any rust or paint chips and take care of it promptly
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Beware of Pump Fuel

I agree with the others. I drove 35 minutes from home to get 5 gallons of E0 high test and then put Stabil Marine and Seafoam in it. I'm confident it will perform and last, but I also keep a supply of Trufuel 4 cycle on hand. If you figure the cost of the gas to drive 70 miles both ways to get the gas, might as well buy Trufuel. Ive used Red Armor 50:1 Echo fuel and nothing else in my blower and weed wacker. Left it in over the summer for each of 3 years. Starts on the first pull, no carb issues. Once youve paid to have a carb replaced, you'll beg them to sell you canned fuel. HD gives a significant discount if you buy 6 quarts or 4 110 oz. jugs. Worth it for infrequent use. The new engines are designed to work on E0 anhydrous, stabilized fuel.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
318 Posts
I agree with the others. I drove 35 minutes from home to get 5 gallons of E0 high test and then put Stabil Marine and Seafoam in it. I'm confident it will perform and last, but I also keep a supply of Trufuel 4 cycle on hand. If you figure the cost of the gas to drive 70 miles both ways to get the gas, might as well buy Trufuel. Ive used Red Armor 50:1 Echo fuel and nothing else in my blower and weed wacker. Left it in over the summer for each of 3 years. Starts on the first pull, no carb issues. Once youve paid to have a carb replaced, you'll beg them to sell you canned fuel. HD gives a significant discount if you buy 6 quarts or 4 110 oz. jugs. Worth it for infrequent use. The new engines are designed to work on E0 anhydrous, stabilized fuel.
I agree but the manufacturers have done a pretty bang up job adjusting to ethanol. I did nothing but top off the tanks and I started them a couple times this summer and have had no issues. They idle fine and start without hesitation.

I also built a custom rock crawler it is a full tube chassis that has an 04 ls1 in it. It gets sporadic use but starts without issues each month. The manufacturers have changed with the times and it’s not near as bad as it used to be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
871 Posts
I agree but the manufacturers have done a pretty bang up job adjusting to ethanol. I did nothing but top off the tanks and I started them a couple times this summer and have had no issues. They idle fine and start without hesitation.

I also built a custom rock crawler it is a full tube chassis that has an 04 ls1 in it. It gets sporadic use but starts without issues each month. The manufacturers have changed with the times and it’s not near as bad as it used to be.
maybe the components can with stand ethanol nowadays, but u cant beat chemistry, ethanol sucks moisture from the air and overtime standing fuel will get contaminated. fuel and water dont mix.
simplest solution, after the season finish off the fuel left in gas tank or empty it out and do same with the carb bowl or just use ethanol free fuel.
im not a fan of fuel additives like stabil but ymmv, imo
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top