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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a set of 16x6.5-8 tires from an MTD snowblower that are in really bad shape. The snowblower itself has a few years left on it. They are tubeless, but don't hold air anymore.

Instead of spending the $100 to replace them, can I get away with spending $20 on tubes and using them instead?

If not, any suggestions on where to find some slightly used tires?

I can find new tires on eBay, of course, but they're $100, and would love to find a way to save some money.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay, awesome. I've done this before - but haven't done it with a tire so degredated. There are sections around the tire that are cracked (dry-rot?) significantly.

I actually already have the tubes - I ordered them without realizing it was a tubeless, so I'll give it a shot tomorrow.
 

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You may find that the sidewalls will split when you pressurize the tube.
Not sure where you're located, but in MA I've seen the occasional ad on FBM or CL selling used snowblower tires (usually on rims). Maybe you'll find a few donor unit.
We also have someone in the area that seems to have several dozen used blowers, as he is posting parts from time to time. You might just get lucky and find what you're looking for.
 

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Yes, .... putting a tube in a tire is just fine .... I prefer cleaning the rims and priming and painting them while the tire is off, and not using tubes whenever possible, however, when a tire is only checked (weather cracked), putting tubes in them is fine if they have lots of tread left. ( I have plugged a wheel barrel tire and a snow blower tire that had a puncture in them with rope plugs ... still holding air 30 years later.

I wore the front tires on my rider bald, and found a pair like new at my transfer station that were checked and not holding air ... I just put tubes in them and that was like 5 years ago ...

FWIW ... having a mini-tire changer is pretty much a must when changing any kind of small equipment tires.
 

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Putting tubes into a small powered yard machine may work but it for sure did not work for me in tubeless tires. I had a problem with a tire on my van. It had a nail in it that I had a shop repair. Apparently the shop pull the nail and thought if had not penetrated through the tire. It had and we could not find the very small leak afterward.

I had the garage put an inner tube into the tire and the damned thing did not even last over a hundred miles. The sidewall flexing wore on the sides of the tube to the point where the tube failed.
 

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Okay, awesome. I've done this before - but haven't done it with a tire so degredated. There are sections around the tire that are cracked (dry-rot?) significantly.

I actually already have the tubes - I ordered them without realizing it was a tubeless, so I'll give it a shot tomorrow.
Honda tires are very expensive. When I do this I buy Carlisle tires for less than half and install tubes.
 

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Hi, I have a set of 16x6.5-8 tires from an MTD snowblower that are in really bad shape. The snowblower itself has a few years left on it. They are tubeless, but don't hold air anymore.

Instead of spending the $100 to replace them, can I get away with spending $20 on tubes and using them instead?

If not, any suggestions on where to find some slightly used tires?

I can find new tires on eBay, of course, but they're $100, and would love to find a way to save some money.
I'd prob skip the tubes
-
 

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These guys are using the same urethane pour foam that I use to repair leaking dock floats...
 
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