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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,
New member here, but not new to snow. :(

For those that use Fluid Film in the discharge chute:
1. How often do you apply it?
2. Do you apply it immediately prior to use, a day/week/month ahead?

Ps. I did do a search.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
O.K.
It's been a while and although several people have viewed the thread, no one has replied.
1. Does this mean I'm the only one here with any interest in the Fluid Film product?
2. Do some of you use a different product you would suggest using for corrosion protection and slickness in the discharge chute?
3. Am I the only one here considering using something to prevent clogging of the chute?
 

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I think its mainly because there's not a lot of people on the forums yet. People are just starting to register. You also have to remember people who have not registered yet can view threads but not post anything. As far as fluid film goes I personally have no previous experience with it. But I also haven't heard about this product before. How big of a difference do you see in the velocity of the snow when you started using Fluid Film?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I think its mainly because there's not a lot of people on the forums yet. People are just starting to register. You also have to remember people who have not registered yet can view threads but not post anything. As far as fluid film goes I personally have no previous experience with it. But I also haven't heard about this product before. How big of a difference do you see in the velocity of the snow when you started using Fluid Film?
The number of visitors seems to be quite high, but very few are registering. Obviously, that will help, but I was hoping that my question might get some of them to register and answer it. :)

If you do a Google search on "Fluid Film", you will find lots of information on the product.
It's a lubricant and corrosion inhibitor and the results posted by many users almost sound too good to be true.
It seems to be pretty popular in the agriculture field and I purchased mine at a John Deere dealer.
So far I have only used it on my garage door hinges, rollers, and worm drive. I really can't comment on performance just yet.
 

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Winter is coming up pretty soon so I'll try this out and try to take some before and after videos. So essentially the Fluid Film is a lot like WD-40 but just coats the metals better and stays on longer?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Winter is coming up pretty soon so I'll try this out and try to take some before and after videos. So essentially the Fluid Film is a lot like WD-40 but just coats the metals better and stays on longer?
I think you pretty well summed up what the fans of Fluid Film are saying.
Since I have not used it to any great extent, I really can't offer any helpful comments from my very limited experience.

FWIW, I personally think WD-40 is a very poor lubricant and I don't feel it does much in the way of protecting metal. Other than using it on nuts and bolts to remove them, I use it very little.
In my experience, the WD-40 lubricates for a very short time. I would not use it where I needed lasting lubrication. With all the solvents in it, it does seem to do some cleaning.
I don't have need of a water dispersant product, but that seems to be the true strong point and intended use of WD-40.
 

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I barely use WD-40 anyway. For anything that I would need WD-40 for. I use PB blaster instead. It works a lot better but I don't think it would be as good as that Fluid Film you're telling me about.
 

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Been around a few snowblower forums. have never heard of anyone applying lubricant to the inside of the discharge chute, however, many owners apply several good coats of automotive wax to this area and say it helps.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Been around a few snowblower forums. have never heard of anyone applying lubricant to the inside of the discharge chute, however, many owners apply several good coats of automotive wax to this area and say it helps.
It's a little different story for me :)
I had never heard of putting anything in/on a discharge chute until this year while doing research before a new snowblower purchase.
There were lots of references to WD-40, silicone spray, even Pam non-stick cooking spray in many forums. Evidently, several products are marketed for that use. The Fluid Film happened to be one that was well thought of and since it was available at the John Deere, Ariens, Honda OPE dealer a few blocks from me, it seemed like a good choice. Maybe I can offer more information after a season's use.

One of the often commented on benefits of FF is the corrosion/rust resistance. Some users spray the entire machine to prevent rust. I did spray the chute, impeller, auger, and inlet scoop of my old unit, but I don't know if it will be of any value or not just yet.
Hey, for less than $10 a spray can, it seemed like it might be worth a try. It took very little for my use.

FWIW, in almost 35 years of using my 8 hp, 26" wide, MTD built 2 stage, I have never applied anything to the chute and I have never had a clogged/plugged chute.

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Interesting discussion, but my original question remains unanswered.

For those that use Fluid Film in the discharge chute:
1. How often do you apply it?
2. Do you apply it immediately prior to use, a day/week/month ahead?
 

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anything, WD40, Pam, FluidFilm, ect. needs to be applied before every use as it does "wear" off from the snow blowing across it.
So basically reapply prior to using the snow blower. Someone mentioned applying car wax on the chute. I might actually try that too. Since I wax my cars before winter starts and I park them on the driveway and the snow doesn't stick to the car. I can just brush the snow off very easily off my car and it still shines like it did. I wonder if it would have the same effects on the chute?
 

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. . .In my experience, the WD-40 lubricates for a very short time. I would not use it where I needed lasting lubrication. With all the solvents in it, it does seem to do some cleaning.
I don't have need of a water dispersant product, but that seems to be the true strong point and intended use of WD-40.
WD-40 was, in fact, originally developed to be a water-dispersing (thus the "WD") free-it-up lubricant. It was actually the 40th formula tried before they got one to work satisfactorily (thus the "40"!).
 

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I bought a can of "Sno Jet" when I bought my machine. I sprayed on the auger area and chute. The directions say the more you use it the better it works. Sounds like a good marketing set of directions to me. I have been spraying it on after the machine dried and I cleaned any crud out of the auger. A friend at work uses Pam and he says it works great. In theory is makes sense. I have also read that if the machine is stored in a heated area and put right into use, that will cause the snow to stick. I don't have that problem in my garage. This is my first snowblower, so I can't tell you a before and after experience.
 

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There is something out there that lasts a lot longer! Liquid Rollers! It is made by Mary Kate, I have been using it for years on my trailer bunks and decided to shoot the the blower, the coating is very durable lasts through several snows. Google it there is a ton of info on it!
 

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Hi,
New member here, but not new to snow. :(

For those that use Fluid Film in the discharge chute:
1. How often do you apply it?
2. Do you apply it immediately prior to use, a day/week/month ahead?

Ps. I did do a search.
I'm a firm believer in the product and my new snowblower will be getting a good coating of Fluid Film.

 

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I'm using E-Z Slide Graphite Paint.
 

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I've used fluid film on my motorcycle chains.
First clean chain with kerosene than spray on fluid film on both sides of the rollers. For my snowblower I have used fluid film for the cables and levers.I think the snow and slush would remove it in the chute while using it. Maybe using it for storage as a spray to inhibit rust . I give the chute and the snowblower a good coat of wax and I've had no issues so far.
 

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I have heard of snow jet and for wet snow/slush I could see it helping… but for light fluffy snow probably not needed.

I would assume anything that would make the surface more slick would help ie wd-40, wax paper, car wax, etc…

I would assume most products would be pretty temporary when moving snow, slush, salt, gravel, ice and other debris are constantly rubbing it. I wonder if a synthetic car wax (sealer) would provide more resistance resulting in more longevity?

When we get a heavy wet snow that sticks to the satellite dish we spay wd-40 on the dish or even pam seems to work by helping the snow slide off and not losing the signal. I’m sure a silicone spray would also work well. So when thinking along those lines if it helps the snow slide off the dish I could only assume it would help with the snow blower.
 

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I have started using tri flow (spray can) on many things such as padlocks, firearms, and I think I’ll try it on the snow blower chute and auger hosing this winter. I may also pick up some fluid film and compare.

They say its a PTFE (teflon) based so maybe that could also help. Again we started using it at work and it seems to hold up well.

Tri-Flow® Resources
 
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