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For the past 25 yrs., I have run my snowblower dry of fuel and fogged the engine at it's last breath of the season. Never had a winter starting problem and hopefully never will. I read these Forums and never see hear people fogging their engines. Moisture will enter the combustion chambers one way or another and something needs to protect the internal parts. I use a fogging oil that I buy from my boat dealer (Evinrude) and find it does quite well.
Does anyone besides me fog their engines at the end of the season? It might help starting problems in the early winter seasons. jmho.
 

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A few do. I mentioned it 6 days ago. Do a search. The easiest is to spray it in the carb after turn off just as the engine is shutting down.
 

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Never have in all my life, which is a long time ... never had an issue doing it my way, new and old equipment, summer or winter,.... suppose I'll continue my present way of doing things.

If fogging your equipment is something that you have been doing, and it works for you, I am sure you will continue.

I personally do not know of any individual that does any fogging of their equipment.
 

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Fogging is done for 2 reasons, to prevent rusting of the cylinder walls, which to me is bogus because as soon as you start the engine, if any rust it gets immediately removed by the pistons. I have opened engines that have sat for 30 years and no rust. Another reason to prevent piston ring lock up. If you are going to store it for years without starting then go ahead and fog it. Fogging distributes the thin oil better than squirting oil through the spark plug hole. I have had snowblowers given to me that have locked pistons.
 

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The way I understand it is that fogging coats engine parts. don't see what the downside is. Honda recommends pulling plug and squirting some oil into chamber and then pulling starter rope a few times to coat engine parts with oil.

who does this? I don't. I have 4-5 snowblowers. fogging seems easier.
 

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I read these Forums and never see hear people fogging their engines.
I fog engines like outboards and motorcycles that will not be started for 6 months or more. Most of my OPE gets started quarterly, so it's not fogged.
 
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They say even just pouring an ounce of regular oil down the spark plug hole is good, far better than nothing and I usually forget to do that too. I always make sure to run my carbs completely dry and have stabil in the gas left in the tank if their is any along with all other routine maintenance, oil change, etc at the end of winter. This way as soon as winter and an unforeseen early snowstorm hits, the machines are 100% ready to go, the following season.
 

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The 2 problems I have removing the spark plug and putting oil down the cylinder, I don't think I'm getting complete coverage and everytime the steel spark plug is removed from an aluminum head you are wearing the aluminum. Fogging in to the carb throat as the engine is dying is easier and faster.
 

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I don't think I'm getting complete coverage and everytime the steel spark plug is removed from an aluminum head you are wearing the aluminum.
I've removed all the plugs from every outboard I've ever owned (maybe 20-25 total since the 1960s?) every fall and fogged the cylinders, then I pull the engine over a few times to ensure full coating and replace the cleaned plugs finger tight until spring when I tighten them and replace the spark leads. I've never had a head require heli-coiling except one that came to me with the threads already stripped, and they usually start right up on a couple of pulls.
 

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I run fuel dry and slowly pull engines over to get into compression stroke to close valves and or block transfer ports


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I've removed all the plugs from every outboard I've ever owned (maybe 20-25 total since the 1960s?) every fall and fogged the cylinders, then I pull the engine over a few times to ensure full coating and replace the cleaned plugs finger tight until spring when I tighten them and replace the spark leads. I've never had a head require heli-coiling except one that came to me with the threads already stripped, and they usually start right up on a couple of pulls.
I agree, I've never had one also. It's just because aluminum is softer, it scares me, or I have greater concern that it is going to strip. Unfounded concern? Probably. Still a concern with me.
 

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I agree, I've never had one also. It's just because aluminum is softer, it scares me, or I have greater concern that it is going to strip. Unfounded concern? Probably. Still a concern with me.
With small engine spark plugs, I have always just "choked up" on the ratchet handle so the web of my thumb is against the ratchet body, and then I tighten them as tight as that allows. I've checked a couple of my tightened plugs with a torque wrench, and I'm pretty much in the ballpark. I'm usually doing this on a dock or in the woods far from home, so I'm happy not to have to risk my good torque wrenches over the water.
 
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