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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 1983 Simplicity 870 and one of the augers is frozen to the shaft. That auger was bent pretty good when I first got it and the shear pin was perfectly straight, so it must be frozen on really good. I was able to straighten that auger out. The other auger is not frozen and the gear box is still in great shape.
This unit does not have any grease fittings like many machines.
Has anyone had this issue and had any luck freeing the auger without disassembly?
I watched the Donyboy73 video on how to remove it when its out of the bucket, using acetylene, penetrant and brute force with a hammer.
Is their any chance I can free it still assembled using acetylene and penetrating oil and tapping it back and fourth still inside the bucket?
Anyone have any luck with that?
I wish it has a grease fitting, because than I could add grease to help free it, but since it doesn't the pentrant will have to be added from both ends and in the hole where the shear pin goes only. Can I try that first and if it doesn't free go to plan B the Donyboy way..
Suggestions are much appreciated.
 

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I've gotten a few rusted on auger rakes off using a mapp torch, a jig, a bfg (big fricken hammer) and a 12 ton press.
Usually takes a few days to a week long to do it.
I do have a pdf on my process, if you want a copy send me a pm with your email and I'd be happy to send it along.
 

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I haven't had to deal with this problem yet, so just going by what I've read.

But I think some people have used a board through one auger, to "anchor" things, then they put a board through the stuck auger, and use that to try and twist it, while keeping the first board from moving.

The first board would be important, for taking the torque, vs applying it to the gearbox.

If there's any snow, I like the idea of pulling the shear pins, and driving it into the nastiest snowbank you can find. Or at least just blow with it for a while with the shear pin removed. Maybe you get lucky.

I wonder if you could drill a hole in the auger, screw in a grease fitting, and use that to pump grease in. You'd add lube, and maybe also help separate things slightly. I think there's been discussion of adding a fitting without removing the auger from the shaft.

Any way to rig up a grease fitting temporarily at the shear pin hole?

I've also seen people mention using an air hammer, with a blunt face, to pound on the auger tube, to maybe help loosen things up. I have seen vibration eventually loosen rusted stuff, so that approach seems interesting, and fairly harmless.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I've gotten a few rusted on auger rakes off using a mapp torch, a jig, a bfg (big fricken hammer) and a 12 ton press.
Usually takes a few days to a week long to do it.
I do have a pdf on my process, if you want a copy send me a pm with your email and I'd be happy to send it along.
Thanks, PM sent.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I haven't had to deal with this problem yet, so just going by what I've read.

But I think some people have used a board through one auger, to "anchor" things, then they put a board through the stuck auger, and use that to try and twist it, while keeping the first board from moving.

The first board would be important, for taking the torque, vs applying it to the gearbox.

If there's any snow, I like the idea of pulling the shear pins, and driving it into the nastiest snowbank you can find. Or at least just blow with it for a while with the shear pin removed. Maybe you get lucky.

I wonder if you could drill a hole in the auger, screw in a grease fitting, and use that to pump grease in. You'd add lube, and maybe also help separate things slightly. I think there's been discussion of adding a fitting without removing the auger from the shaft.

Any way to rig up a grease fitting temporarily at the shear pin hole?

I've also seen people mention using an air hammer, with a blunt face, to pound on the auger tube, to maybe help loosen things up. I have seen vibration eventually loosen rusted stuff, so that approach seems interesting, and fairly harmless.
Thanks for the reply. I like the idea of drilling hole's and adding grease fittings. I think I'm going to do that. I know Ariens uses threadless grease fittings, so I'll order a couple of those, drill the holes and tap those right in. Unfortunately their is no snow here yet so I would have to wait to run it without the shearpin in. Maybe I can go thru a pile of wood chips, its harmless enough. Or I'll add the fitting's insert the grease. Hit the thing with a Torch, block the other auger and give the frozen one a few good hits with a blunt hammer and try and free it without the force going to the gearbox. It might just work. Thanks for the tips. Those grease fittings will come in handy going forward. 👍
 

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Dusty,

I have no doubt that heating the assembly up with an acetylene torch is a good method, and this really is one of the most frustrating and unfortunately common problems that pop up with blowers. :sad2:

Had the same thing happen with my old Murray/Noma. One side slid right off, the other couldn't be pulled of the shaft for love nor money. I must have tried to put penetrating oil on for several days, while tapping it with a heavy hammer. Not having an acetylene torch, I decided to go to a tool rental shop and rent two of the biggest pipe wrenches they had. With one wrench locked down on the exposed shaft of the side where the auger just slid off, and the other around the tubular portion of the stuck auger, I figured with just a little torque I could break the grip. Pushing and pulling in opposite directions as hard as I could it still wouldn't budge. :icon_cussing_black:

So I decided to try twisting one with both hands with repeated fast jerking motions, while the second wrench on the shaft was held captive by the top of the work bench. At one point I thought I felt something move, and kept it up until I could be sure. More penetrating oil. Then back to tapping it with the heavy hammer....well you get the idea. Finally........:icon-woo:

What was almost as frustrating, was when the two pieces were separated, I looked at the shaft and of course there was some rust, but it really didn't look that bad! Certainly not bad enough to maintain that kind of grip....but go figure.

Whichever method you use, you'll get it eventually. That hardest part about the whole job is maintaining your patience, because the whole experience just pisses you off to no end! :banghead:.
.
 
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I just had one frozen. I had a 2' pipe wrench and a shorter one. I heated it with an oxy-acetylene torch until it was red except where the torch was going to grip. Pulling and pulling down even with a pipe over the pipe wrench for extra leverage did not work. What worked was working the 2 pipe wrenches up and down, slowly working it free wondering if it was going to work, then it moved just a little. I wasn't even sure if it moved, then worked it again, then I was sure it moved, finally it moved, a lot, and around by hand.The oxy-acetylene torch was critical.

Oh, the board broke. And I didn't like using my 6' shale bar to turn it. I felt there was too much pressure on the gearbox using leverage.
 
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Here's a couple of additional things regarding rusted Auger rakes that are stuck on the shaft. On the thought about adding grease zerks - good idea overall. Bad idea on just drilling the auger rake and threading them in. The zerks stick in too far to get the rake back on the shaft. IIRC it was McMaster Carr had weld on bungs you would thread or were prethreaded to fit zerks. Drill your hole in the auger rake and weld the bung onto the outside of the rake and it gave the required clearance necessary.
I also have a wire brush I can chuck into a drill that fits down the inside of the auger rakes to try and clean out the rust I can. I've been tempted to try electrolysis some time to clean out the rust on the inside but have yet to do that.
On the issue of the shaft itself and the rust, I happen to have a metal lathe, I'll chuck it into the lathe and spin it and using emery paper get as much as possible off it (long as it will fit in the lathe). Next is using a rust encapsulation product on it, then an epoxy paint. Finally before reassembly, I coat the thing liberally with antiseize the entire length. On the antiseize, a few years back I bought a machine that was very rusted out of a snowbank. On disassembly the prior person had done the antiseize to the shafts and even though the condition it was in and so many bolts rusted up solid, the rakes slid right off the shaft. That sold me for using antiseize on the shafts.
 

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.

Before installing the zerk(s), consider squirting a 50/50 mix of Acetone/ATF in the hole(s), letting it penetrate, and using the machine in the snow for a bit

Just need a portal to get the penetrating fluid in

.
 

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You can buy press in zerk fitting called drive in. If they are too long, grind then shorter. An idea posted on here recently suggested welding on a nut and screwing the zerk in to that. Suggested by Guybb drill a small hole and use a needle in the end of your grease gun.
 

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Here's a couple of additional things regarding rusted Auger rakes that are stuck on the shaft. On the thought about adding grease zerks - good idea overall. Bad idea on just drilling the auger rake and threading them in. The zerks stick in too far to get the rake back on the shaft. IIRC it was McMaster Carr had weld on bungs you would thread or were prethreaded to fit zerks. Drill your hole in the auger rake and weld the bung onto the outside of the rake and it gave the required clearance necessary.
I also have a wire brush I can chuck into a drill that fits down the inside of the auger rakes to try and clean out the rust I can. I've been tempted to try electrolysis some time to clean out the rust on the inside but have yet to do that.
On the issue of the shaft itself and the rust, I happen to have a metal lathe, I'll chuck it into the lathe and spin it and using emery paper get as much as possible off it (long as it will fit in the lathe). Next is using a rust encapsulation product on it, then an epoxy paint. Finally before reassembly, I coat the thing liberally with antiseize the entire length. On the antiseize, a few years back I bought a machine that was very rusted out of a snowbank. On disassembly the prior person had done the antiseize to the shafts and even though the condition it was in and so many bolts rusted up solid, the rakes slid right off the shaft. That sold me for using antiseize on the shafts.
Many folks here have discussed using the homemade remedy of 50% acetone and 50% transmission fluid for loosening rusted objects, would this application work on the rusted shafts talked about here?
 

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Many folks here have discussed using the homemade remedy of 50% acetone and 50% transmission fluid for loosening rusted objects, would this application work on the rusted shafts talked about here?
Absolutely. In fact I may have been one of earliest people recommending this. I found out about it on a woodworking website. It along with electrolysis were highly recommended as means of getting things loose that were rusted on solid. Both do work but like everything else take time.
The biggest thing is getting the solution into the areas that are rusted up. One of the reasons I made a gig to hold the auger shaft vertically so you can work it in. It won't work overnight but it will work and it's easy to come by.
 

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I wonder why manufacturers don't sleeve the shaft with a piece of plastic or PVC ?
Probably the same reason they don't anti-seize the various bolts. $$. And because it won't be *their* problem in 5 years when it needs to come apart.

I've tried the 50/50 acetone & ATF. Unfortunately, it didn't seem to really help with my fasteners, but that doesn't mean it's bad. I have some Kroil spray now.

I like the electrolysis idea, I need to look more into what's required to do that. I have some fairly powerful DC power supplies, so I have electrical sources available (like rescued server power supplies, 12V, 500W). One of the handy things I've acquired is a little variable-voltage (and amperage) DC lab power supply, it puts out up to 3A, to 30V. It would be nice if it had a higher amperage output, but it's been a nice tool when you suddenly need a stable DC source in some random voltage.
 

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I just had one frozen. I had a 2' pipe wrench and a shorter one. I heated it with an oxy-acetylene torch until it was red except where the torch was going to grip. Pulling and pulling down even with a pipe over the pipe wrench for extra leverage did not work. What worked was working the 2 pipe wrenches up and down, slowly working it free wondering if it was going to work, then it moved just a little. I wasn't even sure if it moved, then worked it again, then I was sure it moved, finally it moved, a lot, and around by hand.The oxy-acetylene torch was critical.

Oh, the board broke. And I didn't like using my 6' shale bar to turn it. I felt there was too much pressure on the gearbox using leverage.

I never had to do it, but the first thing that came to mind was my big ol' pipe wrenches.
 

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I wonder why manufacturers don't sleeve the shaft with a piece of plastic or PVC ?



Heck, RIT'.......where's the fun in that? :devil:


If they did that, then anyone would be able get the augers off! :wink2:


.
.
 
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I just had one frozen. I had a 2' pipe wrench and a shorter one. I heated it with an oxy-acetylene torch until it was red except where the torch was going to grip. Pulling and pulling down even with a pipe over the pipe wrench for extra leverage did not work. What worked was working the 2 pipe wrenches up and down, slowly working it free wondering if it was going to work, then it moved just a little. I wasn't even sure if it moved, then worked it again, then I was sure it moved, finally it moved, a lot, and around by hand.The oxy-acetylene torch was critical.

Oh, the board broke. And I didn't like using my 6' shale bar to turn it. I felt there was too much pressure on the gearbox using leverage.

I never had to do it, but the first thing that came to mind was my big ol' pipe wrenches.
 
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