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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, new member here. Just used my st227 for the second time and the cable that controls the up and down movement of the chute is frozen solid. anyone with a solution? worried about putting cable lube down, have read somewhere that they are silicone lined and might be destroyed with lube. Is this possibly something warranty should take care of?
 

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Are you sure the cable is frozen and hot the hinge, on my neighbour 224 the hinge was frozen a small lift is all it took.
 

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They make special lube for motorcyle cables...... I would use that if it comes down to it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It's the cable freezing. Thawed it out, it worked till I went back outside with it for 10 minutes and froze up again. Wondering if a heavier duty cable and spring is available. Somehow moisture must be getting past the boot around the cable. Thought others would have this issue as it seems like a major flaw.
 

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I would favor oil which would displace water, vs. antifreeze which would mix with water.

And I would not worry about using any kind of "normal" oil (motor oil etc.) on that cable. Most cable sheaths are lined with nylon which is fine being oiled.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the responses. I thought it should be dried out too, and then add cable lubricant. After I'm done, I think I will put zip ties around the boot ends to see if that will keep further moisture intrusion at bay.
 

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First, i'd try to get the existing moisture out. Might try dry gas, but be carful and wear gloves. Go slow, and let it work it's way through. You will need to re-lube after.
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
FIXED! First took the cable off the chute and let the water drain, there was more than I thought would be in there then I used db9938's idea and used a dry gas to remove any moisture. Then I let gravity drain the isopropyl out and used compressed air to push out the remaining fluid. Then re lubed the cable with some Polaris clutch/ cable lube I had laying around. Because of the amount of moisture I found in the cable, I decided to put zip ties around both ends of the boot. Put it outside for an hour to test, and no freeze up. I would advise anybody who has an ST200 series to put zip ties on your cable boot. Thanks again everyone.
 

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Sweet, good to hear.
 

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For those playing at home... The cable housing is silicone lined so it normally wouldn't need lubrication. You want to thaw the cable of course. Then WD-40 (Water Displacer Forty...) is the weapon of choice. Make sure the boot is installed correctly on the business end of the cable to keep water out in the future.
 

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Agreed, the challenge though is to get a good seal, on the up side to force it down and out. And I have yet to come up with a decent, "garage worthy" fix..... And as I sit here, I just had a flash. What about using a ballon, with a hole poked in it. simply feed the cable in through the inflating end, feed the lug through the hole, down the cable. Then simply insert the nozzle beside the cable, and twist the balloon to create a reasonable facsimile of a seal. Wear eye protection.....

What do you think?
 

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Ariens machines were having this problem and the later models had a longer cable that looped over so water (melting snow) did not enter the sleeve.
 

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And the convenient rubber boot doesn't hurt. Hmm, add some zip ties to the balloon, and you might have a temporary "garage fix' that's similar.
 

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The bellows/gaiter/whatever that's already on the cable is fine if it's fitted correctly. Part of the joy of the fitup is the way the pivot is done at the deflector end. It will bind up if it's not perfect, cauing the end of the cable to bow and pop th little bellows off at the end and let water in. Make double sure that the end of the cable is free to pivot on the bolt, and that tha cable stays pretty straight through the whole travel especially full extension.
 

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True, I was just thinking of a cheap "garage fix."
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Ariens machines were having this problem and the later models had a longer cable that looped over so water (melting snow) did not enter the sleeve. As far as WD40, it dries out and with warm and cold, moisture could still form in the bottom cable loop, so just a little cable lube should displace any moisture forming there.
That is exactly the problem the Huskys are having! The boot (even when installed correctly) will allow water to seep in. I put a little dab of silicone around the eyelet and then put on a zip tie. That should suffice. Wd40 dries out, so a little cable lube settling at the bottom of the loop should displace any moisture developing due to cold to warm situations.
 
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