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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So long story short, I have a Craftsman C950.521260 Snowblower that over the winter the pull cord snapped on the recoil starter, over the winter I just used the electric start on it. Warmer weather finally arrived I decided to take the thing apart to fix the snapped pull rope.. needless to say whoever designed this for having to remove half the stupid shrouds should be fired.

Well I had to remove the carburator to slide recoil starter out. After putting everything back together now when I prime the fuel I get leaking by the Intake Arrestor, item #610 in the picture. At first I thought it was the gasket that was the issue, #163 but after make sure its carefully seated and even making my own new one I still get fuel seepage at this air arrestor (intake). From what I recall, this thing did not drip fuel previously to me taking it apart.

Anyways can someone tell me if this is normal or what? I just don't see how fuel once primed into the carburator wouldn't spill into the meshed arrestor? the opening hole on the arrestor is exactly the same size and lines up perfect with the opening on the carubator.

The gasket and arrestor sit on the opposite side of #130A in the other image. Would the Main Jet have something to do with fuel overflowing into this arrestor? This would be item #117.

Anyways looking forward to some help as Im getting frustrated with this thing and I know the gasket is seated properly and all.
 

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When you prime the carb, you are pressurizing the fuel bowl, causing gas to rise up through the main jet and enter the venturi of the carb. It actually floods the venturi with raw fuel which is then sucked into the intake and then into the engine to help it start with the quick shot of over rich mixture.
The excess gas has to go somewhere while it is sitting in the carb venturi, so it will run out through the "arrestor".
What you are describing is perfectly normal behavior. If you pump the primer bulb too much, you will get a lot of fuel dripping out.
There is usually a little passageway designed in there somewhere to allow the excess gas to drip out so you dont get too much gas in the carb venturi, which could cause a "Hydro-lock", and lock up the piston travel and not allow the engine to turn over, and of course, "Flood" the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When you prime the carb, you are pressurizing the fuel bowl, causing gas to rise up through the main jet and enter the venturi of the carb. It actually floods the venturi with raw fuel which is then sucked into the intake and then into the engine to help it start with the quick shot of over rich mixture.
The excess gas has to go somewhere while it is sitting in the carb venturi, so it will run out through the "arrestor".
What you are describing is perfectly normal behavior. If you pump the primer bulb too much, you will get a lot of fuel dripping out.
There is usually a little passageway designed in there somewhere to allow the excess gas to drip out so you dont get too much gas in the carb venturi, which could cause a "Hydro-lock", and lock up the piston travel and not allow the engine to turn over, and of course, "Flood" the engine.
ST1100A, thanks a lot for your informative post! This makes me rest easier and not think I'm crazy and a fool by not being able to properly seal that arrestor to the carburator. lol

Now with my luck, I lost the main jet (#117) somewhere, I thought I had placed it on a safe place on my workbench but looks like with the shuffling of things it got knocked over... how crucial is this item and do I really need it?
 

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the main jet is VERY important, without it you have a boat anchor.
 
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