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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Giving my machine new life! *Update 5/5/19

Sorta started a post here if curious: https://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/ariens-snowblowers/147815-need-advice-replacing-engine.html#post1650873


SO! An update, I purchased the engine and it just arrived today. Went out in the 20-some degree weather and decided to check it out. It's a Briggs 1500 Snow series engine, a nice 8hp that'll give me more than enough power. Got a great deal on it for under $200.



And here's what it's going on, my free Ariens 10962 Sno-Thro. It was running fine up until last Thursday when it developed a sudden oil leak and seized the engine.



The unit split in half. Excuse the blurry images, my phone didn't want to focus for some reason...


The engine mounted to the tractor, however it cannot be bolted down because the engine base is too thick. It was at this point, after pulling the old engine off, that I discovered where the leak was. It looks like it may have blown a head gasket as the oil had made its way UNDER the base of the engine, I'm guessing the air from the flywheel pushed it under, which explains why I didn't see almost any oil at all.



Anyone have any ideas how to extend the studs without cutting them out? I'd hate to waste them since they're already there. I'm wondering if I could enlarge the holes on the base and then get some of those bolt extensions, the kind they use on threaded rod and get some threaded rod to bring them up just an extra inch or so.




This is only the beginning. I have plans to clean it all up, get a new belt, grease everything, etc. I need to pull the impeller out of the bucket because one of the fan blades was bent from the previous owner. Everything I did here only took me about an hour and a half, mainly because it was frickin' cold out and this is my first time doing something like this, so I'm learning.
 

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Always interesting working on a blower but we on here are picture freaks - more More MORE - please

Less than $200 is a great deal. I may purchase one for an upgrade machine.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I like pics too, so I'm taking pics as I go! :D


I picked it up from eBay of all places, seller had something like 20k ratings and almost 100% feedback. Dunno if we can drop links here, but I can message it to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Cut them off...center punch the studs, drill and tap them to 5/16 coarse, and bolt it down.

I will give that a try, I didn't know how hard the studs were, sometimes they like to make them out of hardened steal and you can't easily drill through.
 

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The engine mounted to the tractor, however it cannot be bolted down because the engine base is too thick.
Anyone have any ideas how to extend the studs without cutting them out? I'd hate to waste them since they're already there. I'm wondering if I could enlarge the holes on the base and then get some of those bolt extensions, the kind they use on threaded rod and get some threaded rod to bring them up just an extra inch or so.
-->Look if the studs are going through the body…If they do and are installed from underneath, using a hammer punch them out and reinstall longer ones in their place (or you could also use longer bolts) with nylon-type lockwashers to prevent them from getting loose because of the vibration and you should be fine. :thumbsup: Personally, I wouldn't like to enlarge the holes in a brand new engine… :(

Good luck,

Claude. :)
 

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The studs are soft....just make sure you drill in the center, and use the drill bit size recommended for tapping 5/16 coarse. the head of the stud is welded, and if you try and drive them out, you may distort the base of the tractor. The thickness of the stud heads give you a lot of meat to tap into, so between the sheet steel and the head of the stud, you have plenty of threads. If you mess up...just replace the drilled out studs with longer bolts....no easy as everything in the tranny gets in your way.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Well, I'm planning on opening up the tranny so I can clean and grease everything that needs to be, so maybe I'll work at dissembling things to make it easier since I'll be in there anyway. There's a chance I may have to replace the friction wheel and I've been watching vids on how to do it. The belt doesn't look like it's ever been replaced, so I'm wondering if the friction wheel needs to be serviced as well (though, you'd never know it because the thing will pull you off your feet in 4th gear if you're not paying attention :p). At the very least, I could drill the old studs out and tack some bolts in with a friend's MIG welder from inside, he's good at things like that.
 

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I cut my studs off about 1/4” above the deck and welded extensions on. No pounding, no drilling, took all of 15 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I cut my studs off about 1/4” above the deck and welded extensions on. No pounding, no drilling, took all of 15 minutes.

I was wondering if a welded stud would be strong enough, I'll keep that as an option too :D
 

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Cut them off...center punch the studs, drill and tap them to 5/16 coarse, and bolt it down.
All you're tapping is into a couple thin tack welded plates. I'd recommend breaking the tack welds and just using nylock nuts, bolts, and washers. Faster and more secure.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Hi,

When you ordered the engine did you know the studs would line up with the engine base holes or you took a gamble?

I actually did not know if they would, but this was my thinking. Every video I saw of people using Predator engines said they had to tap new holes, so I was preparing myself for it. Also, this engine is a "snow" version and so I did keep it in the back of my mind that the studs might actually line up and they did. While the studs aren't long enough, at least I won't have to measure anything and I know that the pulleys will line up no matter what :D
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Welp, back again and the project continues. Been getting warmer out and then cold again, so I've been going out when I can to work on the beast. I went out to our local motorcycle graveyard to see if I could find some salvage parts and came out with some things I was looking for and some extras. I snagged multiple chute control rods, universals, and bucket accessories for a measly $25! Sadly, they didn't have very many auger machines, mostly just tiny paddle blowers and I only found two Ariens, one of which was an early version of my 10962, it had a solid drive axle instead of the locking differential that mine does.



I got the gearbox opened up with no problem, everything is clean (minus grease of course) and the friction wheel isn't torn up, but I'll be replacing that over the summer to something much better looking. I'm gonna clean everything off real good when I take the guts out and re-grease everything:


Next item on the list (though no specific order) was the chute control. I already knew I would have to replace it because the new engine is much larger than the old one, but I think I got the solution:


The first bit is a universal and rod set off of a Montgomery Ward snow blower. The interesting thing is that the machine looks nearly identical to an Ariens of the same design. The rod fit perfectly in the worm gear too. I wanted to use one of those large worm gears that look like a spring, but I think this will work fine. Note: the spacer just before the worm gear is just there to hold everything in place so I can adjust everything since I don't have a roll pin installed:



The next bit is a universal off an Ariens machine, I believe a 20000 "compact" is what they were called:



A mounting bracket off the same "compact" machine. I don't have everything permanently set, so it's just kinda sitting there holding the rod in place. That was a very nice find and will give the chute control a much more professional look (and another one of those collars to hold it in place, that one might stay there to keep it from slipping, I'm also entertaining the idea of a rod support for the second rod going to the worm gear):



Just a shot of some other goodies I salvaged off the Montgomery Ward machine and another that the name escapes me. A set of bucket extensions (though I can't use because I totally forgot my machine had round edges), a nice pair of drift cutters and skid shoes from the MW machine:



One "upgrade" I had to do was part of the belt shroud that attaches to the output side of the motor. The block is recessed and you can't tighten the bolts without bending the metal part of the shroud's back plate, so I snagged some aluminum tubing and cut it to size to make some extra long "washers" to take up the space between the block and the back plate. I figured it would be a good thing to have on since it keeps junk out of the belt:





THEN as a bonus mod, I never had a chute shovel and did not have a place to put it. I didn't want to drill into the bucket and instead made up a small grip on one of the uprights. I used some plumbing clamps that had a threaded end for hanging pipes and some of those metal wall clips for hanging brooms on pegboard. I had to bend the clips out of the way so I could use the hole to attach them to the pipe clamps, but now I can just grab the thing and go :D



I shall continue on and keep more updates posted, hopefully spreading them out instead of grouping them all together like this :p
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Wanted to share some of the slow going process of reworking my Ariens machine. Less pics this time, but more story :D


Went and decided to work on the fly wheel. Got into it and just started unbolting things here and there with the help of some other people who had given me some insight of what to look for. In the end I found out it was easier to remove the entire bracket that the flywheel mechanism was mounted to. That's where the problem came out. Turns out the threads of the studs that hold the bearing retainers in place were completely stripped from the factory. One whole side was unable to be removed while the other side had three good threads. I only had to cut off one nut. The pic below shows my solution for putting a nut back on to where there were good threads. On the opposite side, I put a second nut on top of the others to ensure they were still tight and holding everything in place:





Second image is the gearbox completely reassembled. My middle finger on my left hand has been left bruised and raw from trying to reattach the retainer spring that is hidden behind the chain and gears on the lower left side. Even with the spring hook tool I was using, but I got it. I also have four possible grease points I need info on. The chain and gear assembly, the center tube/rod just in front of the flywheel and the flywheel shaft. What type of grease would be good for these three areas?






I would also like to note that after doing all this, the clutch seems to be a lot less loose than before. I'm not sure why this would be the case, but the linkages and just the feeling of depressing the clutch handle feels really smooth and firm, unlike before it felt loose and sloppy.


Overall, I'm pleased that this portion of the rebuild is complete and I'm gonna get everything inside cleaned up and regreased. I'm thinking about a video next showcasing the chute mods I've done, you can kinda see them there already :D
 

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Don't drill out the base of the engine or you would risk it cracking in due time, plus you will weaken it.
While you are taking it apart that far, I would cut off the studs flush with the base, then either drill them out and tap them, then install bolts through them by screwing them in from the bottom going up, and weld the bolt heads fast to the base of the studs, or just drill them big enough to place the bolts in, and weld them fast.
I would place the engine on it first and bolt it fast before you weld them, that way you know they will fit properly. That way if you ever have to remove the engine, you just remove the nuts from the top, and wont have to worry about getting a wrench on the bolts from underneath, and also if you would mount the bolts from the top, engine side, and you tap the holes, and if you would ever strip the threads from tightening the engine or miss- align them when installing them you would have some extra work to do to repair it.
Plus the base of the studs are not very thick to get enough good threads tapped into and they could strip out easier. I would run the bolts up through the bottom and weld them fast while you have it that far apart.
The engine you got, the engine chassis size is S.A.E. Spec and the original engine is the same S.A.E. Spec chassis size so the bolt hole spacing is usually the same. A Predator engine is not S.A.E. Spec so their holes usually wont match up.
The Briggs motor is Better and you can get parts for it easier. The Briggs is also a variant of an "Intek" engine, which were built in China for a while and were copied off of the Honda engines engineering, so those engines are supposed to be a decent engine, better than a LCT motor or a Predator.
Some of your Simplicity Snowblowers are using that same engine that you are using. The Briggs engines on the Simplicity have a three year consumer usage warranty.
 

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Don't drill out the base of the engine or you would risk it cracking in due time, plus you will weaken it.
While you are taking it apart that far, I would cut off the studs flush with the base, then either drill them out and tap them, then install bolts through them by screwing them in from the bottom going up, and weld the bolt heads fast to the base of the studs, or just drill them big enough to place the bolts in, and weld them fast.
I would place the engine on it first and bolt it fast before you weld them, that way you know they will fit properly. That way if you ever have to remove the engine, you just remove the nuts from the top, and wont have to worry about getting a wrench on the bolts from underneath, and also if you would mount the bolts from the top, engine side, and you tap the holes, and if you would ever strip the threads from tightening the engine or miss- align them when installing them you would have some extra work to do to repair it.
Plus the base of the studs are not very thick to get enough good threads tapped into and they could strip out easier. I would run the bolts up through the bottom and weld them fast while you have it that far apart.
The engine you got, the engine chassis size is S.A.E. Spec and the original engine is the same S.A.E. Spec chassis size so the bolt hole spacing is usually the same. A Predator engine is not S.A.E. Spec so their holes usually wont match up.
The Briggs motor is Better and you can get parts for it easier. The Briggs is also a variant of an "Intek" engine, which were built in China for a while and were copied off of the Honda engines engineering, so those engines are supposed to be a decent engine, better than a LCT motor or a Predator.
Some of your Simplicity Snowblowers are using that same engine that you are using. The Briggs engines on the Simplicity have a three year consumer usage warranty.

So is a Briggs straight up Intek ok as a winter engine????
 
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