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Discussion Starter #1
i decided not to buy that small one
i,m going to look at at ,i think a 63 or 64 machine (half teardrop)
seller says machine runs great and is in my price range
i like old machines but worried is this something that will be good for me
or should i stay away from it and go for something newer?
 

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Go to youtube and type "what to look for used snowblower" you will find a 13 minute vid by doneyboy73. Watch it and you're good to go. Take notes if you have to.
 

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Pay attention to the auger gearbox. It should be fairly quiet. If you reach in the front and grab the shaft that goes back towards the fan, it shouldn't have any play.
 

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Well... I'm not a fan of old snow blowers, particularly old Ariens and I'm sticking to my guns on that. If you live in light fluffy snow, you'll probably be just fine. I've had the displeasure of 3 old blowers (2 old Ariens, 1 Montgomery Ward) using them in New England.

The issue is, they simply weren't designed to throw snow OR were designed for driveways that are 1 car wide. The Montgomery Ward could throw the thick snow we get about 3 feet, both old Ariens about 5-7 feet. Nothing like blowing my driveway that's 20 feet wide with an old Ariens throwing the stuff 5 feet. The old Ariens loved to ride up on the snow at the end of the driveway I had to really pull up on the handles... it used to wear me out so much. Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year.

The transmissions.... ugg. Typically reverse is the first to show signs of not working but it's an easy adjustment, however very finicky. But a couple years ago I was done blowing with the old Ariens and was heading to the garage in 4th gear. Let go of the drive and auger levers to open the garage door and the **** thing didn't disengage went right into the **** door, with chains and plenty of horsepower. I don't trust them now at all, what if that were my son.

Anyway, I spent $550 at my small engine repair shop on one Ariens to get it to throw further apparently all he could do was spray the chute as it threw a little better for a storm or 2. There are paddle things people can install and I'm sure helps a little... but it's physics. How does increasing the impeller from 10" to 10.5" mean you'll be throwing snow twice as far? The physics say they can only add 5% throwing distance at best. My other old Ariens I spent $450 on carb repairs from my small engine shop over the years and finally got so sick of the thing running like crap I put it on craigslist for $35.

About the late 80's things changed drastically for throwing distance. Unless this is for show, or collection, or you live in an area with light puffy snow then maybe. But I would opt for something at least 1990 with Toro's (I'm a Toro fan), 1995 with Ariens, any Honda. They're not typically all that much more expensive. A craigslist tip is, find a post the person doesn't post a picture. Everyone completely skips over those... but a lot of the time they're people who take great care of their machines but as another poster said aren't good at posting. You also have those who are great posters (plenty of pictures) but the machines are crap.

Anyway, I'm not a fan of old blowers for actual use... at all. Been there, done that, very happy to have moved on.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Pay attention to the auger gearbox. It should be fairly quiet. If you reach in the front and grab the shaft that goes back towards the fan, it shouldn't have any play.
just got back from looking at it
the auger shafts are tight,has no rot
the engine smokes on start up but not running ,high and low, no knocks
doesn't throw snow far
no reverse but forward ok $140 delivered 15 mins. away
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Well... I'm not a fan of old snow blowers, particularly old Ariens and I'm sticking to my guns on that. If you live in light fluffy snow, you'll probably be just fine. I've had the displeasure of 3 old blowers (2 old Ariens, 1 Montgomery Ward) using them in New England.

The issue is, they simply weren't designed to throw snow OR were designed for driveways that are 1 car wide. The Montgomery Ward could throw the thick snow we get about 3 feet, both old Ariens about 5-7 feet. Nothing like blowing my driveway that's 20 feet wide with an old Ariens throwing the stuff 5 feet. The old Ariens loved to ride up on the snow at the end of the driveway I had to really pull up on the handles... it used to wear me out so much. Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year.

The transmissions.... ugg. Typically reverse is the first to show signs of not working but it's an easy adjustment, however very finicky. But a couple years ago I was done blowing with the old Ariens and was heading to the garage in 4th gear. Let go of the drive and auger levers to open the garage door and the **** thing didn't disengage went right into the **** door, with chains and plenty of horsepower. I don't trust them now at all, what if that were my son.

Anyway, I spent $550 at my small engine repair shop on one Ariens to get it to throw further apparently all he could do was spray the chute as it threw a little better for a storm or 2. There are paddle things people can install and I'm sure helps a little... but it's physics. How does increasing the impeller from 10" to 10.5" mean you'll be throwing snow twice as far? The physics say they can only add 5% throwing distance at best. My other old Ariens I spent $450 on carb repairs from my small engine shop over the years and finally got so sick of the thing running like crap I put it on craigslist for $35.

About the late 80's things changed drastically for throwing distance. Unless this is for show, or collection, or you live in an area with light puffy snow then maybe. But I would opt for something at least 1990 with Toro's (I'm a Toro fan), 1995 with Ariens, any Honda. They're not typically all that much more expensive. A craigslist tip is, find a post the person doesn't post a picture. Everyone completely skips over those... but a lot of the time they're people who take great care of their machines but as another poster said aren't good at posting. You also have those who are great posters (plenty of pictures) but the machines are crap.

Anyway, I'm not a fan of old blowers for actual use... at all. Been there, done that, very happy to have moved on.
my last machine was a 1995 toro 724
and i didn't like the fat drum,it just rolled up on me alot
 

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Well... I'm not a fan of old snow blowers, particularly old Ariens and I'm sticking to my guns on that. If you live in light fluffy snow, you'll probably be just fine. I've had the displeasure of 3 old blowers (2 old Ariens, 1 Montgomery Ward) using them in New England.

The issue is, they simply weren't designed to throw snow OR were designed for driveways that are 1 car wide. The Montgomery Ward could throw the thick snow we get about 3 feet, both old Ariens about 5-7 feet. Nothing like blowing my driveway that's 20 feet wide with an old Ariens throwing the stuff 5 feet. The old Ariens loved to ride up on the snow at the end of the driveway I had to really pull up on the handles... it used to wear me out so much. Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year.

The transmissions.... ugg. Typically reverse is the first to show signs of not working but it's an easy adjustment, however very finicky. But a couple years ago I was done blowing with the old Ariens and was heading to the garage in 4th gear. Let go of the drive and auger levers to open the garage door and the **** thing didn't disengage went right into the **** door, with chains and plenty of horsepower. I don't trust them now at all, what if that were my son.

Anyway, I spent $550 at my small engine repair shop on one Ariens to get it to throw further apparently all he could do was spray the chute as it threw a little better for a storm or 2. There are paddle things people can install and I'm sure helps a little... but it's physics. How does increasing the impeller from 10" to 10.5" mean you'll be throwing snow twice as far? The physics say they can only add 5% throwing distance at best. My other old Ariens I spent $450 on carb repairs from my small engine shop over the years and finally got so sick of the thing running like crap I put it on craigslist for $35.

About the late 80's things changed drastically for throwing distance. Unless this is for show, or collection, or you live in an area with light puffy snow then maybe. But I would opt for something at least 1990 with Toro's (I'm a Toro fan), 1995 with Ariens, any Honda. They're not typically all that much more expensive. A craigslist tip is, find a post the person doesn't post a picture. Everyone completely skips over those... but a lot of the time they're people who take great care of their machines but as another poster said aren't good at posting. You also have those who are great posters (plenty of pictures) but the machines are crap.

Anyway, I'm not a fan of old blowers for actual use... at all. Been there, done that, very happy to have moved on.
I Think the 10000 Series Machines Work Fine. Here's a pic of my neighbor using one of mine in 2+ feet of snow.


Uploaded with ImageShack.us
 

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it can be fixed up to work just fine. but not at that price. I have sold a few old ariens and they sold recently for $200 after I did belts, friction disc tune up etc. they were fully prepped ready to work.

$140 ... no way... should be closer to $70 ( ps one I just sold was a 5 hp 20 inch ariens, i did all the above and sold for $200...was running when I got it and I paid $40)
 

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Yea, for $140, if you like old Ariens iron, a newer one with a few better features can b e had for that money.

Mine is a mid-70's that I transplanted a 10hp and a pulley mod onto and it throws 30+ feet.
 

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Well... I'm not a fan of old snow blowers, particularly old Ariens and I'm sticking to my guns on that. If you live in light fluffy snow, you'll probably be just fine. I've had the displeasure of 3 old blowers (2 old Ariens, 1 Montgomery Ward) using them in New England.

The issue is, they simply weren't designed to throw snow OR were designed for driveways that are 1 car wide. The Montgomery Ward could throw the thick snow we get about 3 feet, both old Ariens about 5-7 feet. Nothing like blowing my driveway that's 20 feet wide with an old Ariens throwing the stuff 5 feet. The old Ariens loved to ride up on the snow at the end of the driveway I had to really pull up on the handles... it used to wear me out so much. Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year.

The transmissions.... ugg. Typically reverse is the first to show signs of not working but it's an easy adjustment, however very finicky. But a couple years ago I was done blowing with the old Ariens and was heading to the garage in 4th gear. Let go of the drive and auger levers to open the garage door and the **** thing didn't disengage went right into the **** door, with chains and plenty of horsepower. I don't trust them now at all, what if that were my son.

Anyway, I spent $550 at my small engine repair shop on one Ariens to get it to throw further apparently all he could do was spray the chute as it threw a little better for a storm or 2. There are paddle things people can install and I'm sure helps a little... but it's physics. How does increasing the impeller from 10" to 10.5" mean you'll be throwing snow twice as far? The physics say they can only add 5% throwing distance at best. My other old Ariens I spent $450 on carb repairs from my small engine shop over the years and finally got so sick of the thing running like crap I put it on craigslist for $35.

About the late 80's things changed drastically for throwing distance. Unless this is for show, or collection, or you live in an area with light puffy snow then maybe. But I would opt for something at least 1990 with Toro's (I'm a Toro fan), 1995 with Ariens, any Honda. They're not typically all that much more expensive. A craigslist tip is, find a post the person doesn't post a picture. Everyone completely skips over those... but a lot of the time they're people who take great care of their machines but as another poster said aren't good at posting. You also have those who are great posters (plenty of pictures) but the machines are crap.

Anyway, I'm not a fan of old blowers for actual use... at all. Been there, done that, very happy to have moved on.
I'd hardly blame Ariens for you spending $550 on $.25 worth of silicone spray and $450 on carb work. Apparently your small engine guy had a boat payment due that week. $450 is enough to repower the thing two or three times over.

If your machines were the only pushing wet snow 5 feet, something was broken.
 

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I'd hardly blame Ariens for you spending $550 on $.25 worth of silicone spray and $450 on carb work. Apparently your small engine guy had a boat payment due that week. $450 is enough to repower the thing two or three times over.

If your machines were the only pushing wet snow 5 feet, something was broken.
I spent $550 for him to take the Ariens all apart and figure out why it can't throw. Then to do it again a few years later. His response was "I've taken this all apart completely twice. There's nothing wrong with it. Use some silicone spray it helps." The nice fluffy stuff it could throw it 10-15 feet but that's not typically what we get. 5-7 feet was the norm.

The $450 for the carb tune-up was 3 times over 5 years for a different Ariens blower. When the 6th year came and once again it was crapping out with carb issues I'd had it. Always started 1st pull, just ran horrible after that.

We're in luck. The old Ariens 824 is at my Dad's house I'll take it out next time there's a heavy snow and we can watch and laugh together. Even after 2 complete overhauls to improve throwing by a guy in small engine repair business for 10+ years. It was better than the older Montgomery Ward. Wish I could also include my Toro 824 XL to compare it to but that's gone it would take the stuff the Ariens could throw 5 feet and throw it 10-15 feet. Now I have a commercial grade Honda.
 

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it can be fixed up to work just fine. but not at that price. I have sold a few old ariens and they sold recently for $200 after I did belts, friction disc tune up etc. they were fully prepped ready to work.

$140 ... no way... should be closer to $70 ( ps one I just sold was a 5 hp 20 inch ariens, i did all the above and sold for $200...was running when I got it and I paid $40)
You took the words out of my mouth. Asking twice what it's worth in it's current condition.
 

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Well... I'm not a fan of old snow blowers, particularly old Ariens and I'm sticking to my guns on that. If you live in light fluffy snow, you'll probably be just fine. I've had the displeasure of 3 old blowers (2 old Ariens, 1 Montgomery Ward) using them in New England.

The issue is, they simply weren't designed to throw snow OR were designed for driveways that are 1 car wide. The Montgomery Ward could throw the thick snow we get about 3 feet, both old Ariens about 5-7 feet. Nothing like blowing my driveway that's 20 feet wide with an old Ariens throwing the stuff 5 feet. The old Ariens loved to ride up on the snow at the end of the driveway I had to really pull up on the handles... it used to wear me out so much. Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year.

The transmissions.... ugg. Typically reverse is the first to show signs of not working but it's an easy adjustment, however very finicky. But a couple years ago I was done blowing with the old Ariens and was heading to the garage in 4th gear. Let go of the drive and auger levers to open the garage door and the **** thing didn't disengage went right into the **** door, with chains and plenty of horsepower. I don't trust them now at all, what if that were my son.

Anyway, I spent $550 at my small engine repair shop on one Ariens to get it to throw further apparently all he could do was spray the chute as it threw a little better for a storm or 2. There are paddle things people can install and I'm sure helps a little... but it's physics. How does increasing the impeller from 10" to 10.5" mean you'll be throwing snow twice as far? The physics say they can only add 5% throwing distance at best. My other old Ariens I spent $450 on carb repairs from my small engine shop over the years and finally got so sick of the thing running like crap I put it on craigslist for $35.

About the late 80's things changed drastically for throwing distance. Unless this is for show, or collection, or you live in an area with light puffy snow then maybe. But I would opt for something at least 1990 with Toro's (I'm a Toro fan), 1995 with Ariens, any Honda. They're not typically all that much more expensive. A craigslist tip is, find a post the person doesn't post a picture. Everyone completely skips over those... but a lot of the time they're people who take great care of their machines but as another poster said aren't good at posting. You also have those who are great posters (plenty of pictures) but the machines are crap.

Anyway, I'm not a fan of old blowers for actual use... at all. Been there, done that, very happy to have moved on.
I agree. Anything older than mid 1970's often were not very well designed for good snow removal. Scot said that by the 1970's basic snow blower design was optimized. Plus prior to the 1980's many safety features are lacking. I say 1980's good designed machine, may need to repower and you will be set. Plus I do not like bottom end MTD's either too flimsily made.
 

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Just my 2 cents.....The rubber paddle impeller extensions are not intended to lengthen the vanes so they throw farther. The are used to fill in the gap between the vane and the housing so the heavy wet slush does not fall past.
 

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"Those old Ariens had slick tires too man, absolutely pointless without chains now I'm certain that blower comes with chains on the tires. I found their carbs to be finicky too, even running the blower out of gas for the summer I typically had carb issues the next year."
I am not a big fan of really old engines either. I guess too many people tend to always think of the so-called good old days. Not everything was always better with old power equipment from a long time ago and in 1990 and 1991 I help to do maintenance for a lawn cutting and tree trimming and landscaping business and I got to know a thing or two about small engines. I had a knack for fixing things and in the morning once a week I worked with the co-owner of the company and he was a mechanic by trade and he taught me some things about maintenance and how to fix things like sheared vertical shaft engine flywheel keys which happened a few times every season when you hit something when cutting. I usually find that a 40 year old engine is often totally worn out meaning new valve guides will need to be put in and over bore and new rings and of course they will often leak oil on you and a whole new gasket set runs about $40+ on these old Briggs and Tecumseh's. Factor in a carburetor kit that contains new needle valves and seats and gaskets runs another $40 to 50 dollars and you are looking at $150 to $200+ just to stop the oil and gas leaks. Then if the cylinder is worn or the valve guides are worn you are looking at new piston and rings and having a machine shop over bore the block and press in new valve guides and then new valves and adjusting them and checking them with the feeler gauge. Have a shop do this and it will be over $250+ total including parts and labor. Plus old L head engines were not all that good of engines even when they were brand new. Flat head engines were popular with Briggs and Tecumseh because they were less complex and cheaper to make than more complicated OHV and OHC engines. Many of those old Briggs and Tecumseh engines did not have cast iron cylinder liners (other than the I/C Briggs engines) and once they were more than 7 to 10 years old they would often burn oil since the rings and cylinder bore were often worn out. (remember the Chevy Vega?) I always found them to have more problems with carburation due to the poorly designed carburetors. Tecumseh carburetors were really sensitive toward fuel quality and the needle valve adjustable carburetors would seemingly go out of tune just from the vibration of the machine running. Old Briggs 2 piece flo-jet carbs were notorious for leaking and this could make them run poorly since unmetered fuel could enter the intake causing carburation problems. I remember we would often spend more time getting them to run well than with the Kawasaki or Honda engines which I also did maintenance on. OHV engines like the Honda engines are more fuel efficient too and make more power per cc than the old flat head engines did. The OHV engines have their spark plugs in the center of the cylinder unlike the L heads where the spark plug is located between the intake and exhaust valve and on the edge of the cylinder. Also in an L head engine the exhaust needs to make a sharp 90 degree turn down into the exhaust manifold and carbon deposits were often more problematic then the OHV engines which have the valves right over the cylinder. Factor in that the older than 1981 stuff often has breaker point ignitions which are no were near as reliable as electronic ignition is another reason to steer clear. Old Briggs engines however can be easily updated to magnetron electronic ignition however either through the conversion kit or with a magnetron coil which totally bypasses the breaker points.
Stuff like tires are easy enough to fix just get a set of snow hogs tires and you will be set or bigger wheels with snow hogs on them if they have the solid wheels on them like some old machines did. Some times a cheap mod like an impeller kit (use of rubber extensions to reduce the gap between the impeller and drum) can really fix the snow throwing ability of an old snow blower. I put one in my 1996 MTD and it works great now. I spent all that time painting the old Montgomery Ward (Gilson) 8/26 and despite cleaning the carburetor and replacing the float needle and seat it still ran poorly and puffed blue smoke once and a while running and burned oil (blue smoke) right after starting the engine for a few seconds or so until it cleared. I am cleaning the MGW 8/26 up and fixing the damaged to the paint due to it leaking oil and gasoline all over and I will repower it and part out the old engine on ebay. Old worn out or tired engines may still continue to run but if they run poorly or lack power or are not reliable then you are often better off repowering the machine than dumping money into fixing them because you will still have an old antiquated L-head engine despite rebuilding the engine. Just my 2 cents worth.
 
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