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This is one of those little tips I've forgotten to post so here goes. Everyone (including myself) recommends if you disassemble the auger on a blower to grease up the auger shaft prior to putting the auger rakes back on, especially for those that don't have grease zerks on the auger rakes. It's a good way to help prevent rust from binding the augers and the shaft together.

Well I'm going to add another option: antiseize compound. I buy the stuff at my autoparts store in about a half pint bottle and it's got a brush on the top. Use it just like grease and coat the shaft before reassembly.

Now before you poo-poo this as just another something-or-other, here's why I'm suggesting this. I bought this snowblower a few years back mainly to get some parts off

As I started disassembling it, found the bones of the unit were good even though it had sat out so long rust had eaten a hole through one of the pulleys.
Imagine my surprise when the auger rakes slid off the shaft with no issues even though rust existed throughout the machine. When checking it out, I found that the last person that had worked on it smeared the auger shaft with antiseize before reassembling.
I filed that away while I decided to bring that one back from the dead.


I took a couple of my keeper machines and did the same thing to them. I pulled the auger rakes and smeared antiseize on the shafts before reassembling. Fastforward a couple of years, just checked them and they are still free and able to be removed without a problem. It doesn't take any longer to do unless you have zerks, and seems to be a good longterm treatment for auger rakes getting rusted to the shaft.

All I can say is it worked for me.

Paul
 

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Good post. I have been using anti seize compound on auger shafts for many years as well as on axles, exhaust bolts and head bolts. Never had a problem with rust seizing. MH
 

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i'll have to remember that paul
 

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We use anti-seize on nearly everything that may rust, anything threaded or that had close tolerances got juiced. Commercial cooling towers are extremely prone to rust due to high humidity and heat. In the past the 6" id bearings would rust onto the shaft and had to be cut off, not ideal. We started to using anti-seize when we reassembled them and never had a problem again.
Good stuff!
 
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