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I have an older yard machine snow blower and it still runs well but the circle handle bolt looks like it is stripped on both sides. Any suggestions on how to fix? 610E2D85-CD3E-4CDE-A1DA-C6CE358537FC_1546180301600.jpeg
 

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I have a set of these, they work great for this: (and to remove locking wheel lugs that you lost the key to)



https://www.sears.com/craftsman-10-pc-damaged-bolt-nut-remover-set-low/p-00952166000P?sid=IDx20141028xBingPLA&sid=IDx20141028xBingPLAx272383375&utm_campaign=&utm_group=1191871020978242-{creative}&utm_term=pla-4578091564185289&msclkid=ee1539fe5d191479449165d68366fa43


Looks like you're going to have to buy a tool, a handy one at that, and then I'd get a piece of steel and weld/bolt/rivet it to that other surface (paint it so it doesn't rust) and re-drill the hole since the hole is now oblong.
 

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I don't know how much room you have in there, looks like the inside of the gearbox, but if you have a cut off wheel, or small reciprocating saw you may be able to cut it off. There's also "nut splitters" if you can get one up there.





https://www.amazon.com/Elitexion-2pcs-Splitter-Damaged-Remover/dp/B07JM42QP3/ref=sr_1_2_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1546183653&sr=8-2-spons&keywords=nut+splitter+tool&psc=1


But I like the first tool the best, works for nuts and bolts, and has never failed me.


Maybe just cut the bolt from the other side, and replace the bolt. Is it loose enough that you can get a hacksaw blade in there?


Did you try vice grips or large pliers? Ones with curved jaws? (probably how it got that way in the first place).
 

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I tried pliers and vice grips but couldn’t budge it. Not enough room for hacksaw. might have to use that splitter or other one you recommended. But I also don’t have a welder to put new steel plate in either, could I put new bolts through with washers if I get it out of there?
 

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Getting the nut out is a minor problem. It's not really that big of a deal. Did you soak it with penetrating oil? Liquid Wrench or something like that, not WD 40, that's not penetrating oil.



The bigger issue is getting that hole right before it gets too big to fix. You could bolt a plate on, but welding is your best choice, I bet a local welder wouldn't charge more than a couple bucks to weld in a plate. I don't weld either, one of the things I never tried/learned. I'm getting too old to learn. :D



If you can't get it welded, yes, bolting is a good alternative. I'd drill and tap a plate, then loc-tite it with red loc-tite. I like that better than nuts and bolts. Something small like a 10-32 thread. In addition, as an alternative to welding, when you screw the plate down, use some epoxy between the pieces.



The plate can be small, looks like 2 inches square would do it. 1/4 inch thick, so you can tap it and get some bite on it. I'm sure a local welder has scrap laying around for something like that.
 

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Thanks again for the ideas. I will give it a try and see if a local welder can help as well.
 

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It's hard to give advice when you don't know a person's mechanical ability and tool set. I hope some of these ideas help. A number of different ways to skin a cat. I mistakenly started with an assumption of how I would address it, given my tool set and how easy it is to do that way.


I gave a few options after I thought about that for a while. Hack-sawing the bolt would be a simple way too.



Good luck.
 

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What exactly is this bolt doing?

To remove it, if you have a Dremel, you could maybe use that from the inside of the frame (where your pic shows). A cutoff wheel might let you "shave" off the side of that sleeve. Once you'd broken the solid sleeve of that piece, it should come loose more easily (pliers on the sleeve to hold it, and unscrew the bolt from it). Or you could run the cutoff wheel down the middle of the bolt itself, and split the sleeve into 2 pieces.

But what is this holding, and what does it go through? Is it holding a tubular handle to something? I'm pretty sure I've seen curved pieces that go up against tubular handles, to help secure them on lawn mowers, etc. Perhaps you could get something like that to put against the outside of the handle, vs a flat plate. But without a little more context, via pictures, I'm not quite sure what this fastener is holding, or how.
 

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I'm 99% sure it's the bottom bolt on the tubular handle. Where it goes from round to flat. That's what it looks like to me, and what I ran with.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Sorry top bolt of 2 on the handle and it causes it to shift gears on its own because it’s so loose
 

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Got it, thanks.

(I was writing before you posted about it being the top bolt. All of this assumed the bolt was through a flat part of the handle. Maybe a bad assumption, sorry.)

Perhaps you could use a somewhat-long bolt from the inside. A bolt sticking out through the frame, with a washer on the inside and outside of the frame (so nothing pulls through the broken-out hole in the frame, and also to spread out the load), then a nut tightened against the outside of the frame so the bolt is clamped up tight around the frame, and stays-put. This gives you a mounting stud for the handle.

I'd maybe put a washer onto the stud first, so the handle isn't against the nut, but is instead against something smooth. Then slip the handle's hole onto the stud, against the washer. The bolt will stick through the handle farther than needed. Put a washer on the outside of the handle, then thread a nut on until it's tight against the handle. If needed, hold the head of the bolt (on the inside of the frame) with a wrench while tightening the nut against the handle).

Of course, if you don't care about the stud staying put with the handle unattached, you can simplify it to:
Bolt (if going from the inside of the frame), washer, frame, handle, washer, nut (tightened securely to hold it all together).

This may not be pretty (and you could reverse the direction, so the bolt faces in instead, so it looks cleaner). But it seems like it could give you a way to re-attach the handle using simple hardware you can just buy, no need to drill, tap threaded holes, etc.

There are definitely other/better methods, just trying to think of something you can do with parts that are easy to buy, and not require any modifications/machining. Loctite on the threads would be useful, or using nylock nuts, so nothing loosens due to vibrations.

If you want to get slightly fancier, you could change to a bolt size that would just fit through the existing frame hole (or drill it to the next-larger size), and drill out the hole in the handle, so that the bolt's diameter is a snug fit in the hole, and is less likely to move around, even if the nut loosens slightly.
 
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