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I am posting this tidbit of history of what happened to the Jacobsen 420 snowblowers, based on information from my time while employed at the factory in Racine. I worked there for alittle under 2 years just before the plant closed in 2001 so the Consumer Products division had long since been sold off, so my story is based on conversations with employees that worked there for many years before I started there and recalled the history, so If anyone has better first hand knowledge from that timeframe, feel free to correct me.

I had seen pictures of this model before I worked at Jacobsen and was curious why it never took off even though it was similar to the Toro CCR2000. So I began to have conversations with the people at the plant trying to gain some insight of this model and what happened to it.

The 420 model was based on the earlier SnowBurst model's frame but had a chute and initially a curved rotor similar to the Toro CCR2000. It had a Jacobsen/Homelite engine that was based on a Homelite design in place of the 501 Jacobsen engine that was in the SnowBurst model. It was offered with and without electric start. It was equipped with a primer for cold start assistance which is one feature the SnowBurst lacked and could cause starting troubles especially with old gas or very cold days. It had a fuel shutoff so you could easily run the carb dry to prevent fuel dripping and stale gas from sitting in the carb between uses. It also had a paddle bail control and chute direction crank at the operator position.

So why when this blower had every feature that the Toro CCR2000 had and more did it fail?

Well here is the story I was told, Toro and Jacobsen both were coming out with the single piece curved rubber paddle/chute design in the mid 80's and both had them in stores at about the same time. I was told that Jacobsen was involved in a lawsuit brought forth by Toro for Patent infringement due to the curved rotor and chute that both machines designs were based on. Jacobsen was forced to stop production of this design and redesign the paddle to a 3 piece design that the later machines were equipped with. Toro must have had the patent before Jacobsen.

I believe, that they were also not allowed to support that curved paddle model with parts for the sold units without paying royalties to Toro, so that hurt Jacobsen reputation and it's customers furthur.

That Lawsuit cost Jacobsen big time and hurt the Consumer Products division, ultimately it was decided to sell it off and focus on the Professional Turf division.

It's too bad they had to go out this way, Jacobsen had some really nice engines and equipment from the beginning up into the 80's.
:(
 

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when I was a kid we had a Jacobsen mower that I thought was great. we also had a neighbor with a toro mower, the two most dependable mowers on the block. at 11yrs old I said that when I grew up and got a house my mower would be a jake or a toro. my mom and dad were long divorced by then and mom couldn't afford a snowblower so I never gave them any thought as a kid
 

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Thanks for relating that story from your experience. Sad that Jacobsen evidently had to back off of their building what would have probably been a great snow thrower. I was told once that they ran into a similar sort of situation with their recoil start mechanism and had to change it because of a suit brought against them by Briggs and Stratton, though I've never really researched it enough to confirm it.

Here's a link to an old auction with some pictures of one of the 420s. It looks like it would have been a good machine.

http://www.publicsurplus.com/sms/auction/view?auc=696951
 

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I found a Jacobsen Sno-Burst like the one pictured below in the trash.

Based on my experience with this Jacobsen, I could understand why its successor might not have sold well.

I got it running fine, but even with new rubber it never would throw snow as good as a Toro S-200.

I found the "power burst" was mostly a gimmick. It would have been nice if the power burst was controllable from the handle.

I eventually gave it away.

 

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I found a Jacobsen Sno-Burst like the one pictured below in the trash.

Based on my experience with this Jacobsen, I could understand why its successor might not have sold well.

I got it running fine, but even with new rubber it never would throw snow as good as a Toro S-200.

I found the "power burst" was mostly a gimmick. It would have been nice if the power burst was controllable from the handle.

I eventually gave it away.

Hi, I am looking at two of these machine's right now. They both look exactly the same except one says electronic ignition on the burst sticker and one doesn't. I found out the one that says electronic ignition has an electric starter. However does that also mean the one machine has an electronic ignition rather than a points ignition and the one that doesn't say electronic ignition is a points ignition or are they both actually point ignition or electronic ignition? I cant tell. The one has a burst where it says power burst on the control panel with a red plastic handle the one with that says electronic ignition just has a circle around the words power burst on the control panel and a metal handle. Is one a points ignition and one an electronic ignition or is one just an electric starter and the other one is not. I am asking because they are both in good shape but are priced 100 apart. I would rather have one with electronic ignition over points the electric starter doesn't really matter to me, it will be nice to have but not a necessity. Does anyone know that can help me. Thank's
Sno-Burst no electronic ignition designation asking $75: Jacobsen Sno-Burst Snowblower
Sno-Burst electonic ignition designated also was told has an electric starter asking $150
Jacobsen Sno Burst 2 stroke single stage snowblower snow blower thrower

They are slightly different in decal and designation, the one that says electronic ignition has an electric starter but does it also have an electronic ignition or points and how about the other one points or electronic? Which looks newer? I would prefer an electronic ignition over a points ignition for reliability reasons. That's my biggest concern.
If I get the one for 50 in great shape is it worth it for 6 inches or less of snow?
I used to have one made by aircap industries and it moved snow great. From my experience his design single stage was better than the chute design so is the Jake just as good? I would think the Jake would be better than a brand called a snow-champ by aircap industries.
 
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