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It's tough to tell w/o seeing the profile of the augers, which is the dead giveaway. But this looks right and sounds right; the part numbers are correct. The fact that they mention the nuts are not included makes me think it is authentic...the Honda kits do not include them either (which I always found odd). An email to the company would clarify for sure.

I've got hundreds of those darn bolts now LOL.
I found a pretty nice 520 with electric start. not sure if paddles need replacing. what is the best way to tell? when running are they supposed to scrape the ground? these dont. I replaced the paddles on my other 520 and measured the new with the old and they were exactly the same width but I noticed a nice improvement with the new paddles. so dont understand.
These paddles on the 520 I just got dont seem to be worn much. thinking of replacing anyway to have a good back up.

thanks in advance.
 

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They shouldn't touch the ground when the machine is standing upright, only when you tilt it to blow snow. That's what engages the handles and that's what pulls the machine along the pavement (Honda refers to it as semi-propelled). A distance slightly larger than a paint stick (about 3/8") between the paddles and the sidewalk means they are fine. Anything greater means change them. By "width" I am assuming you don't mean thickness—that's not as important. The paddles will fray and leave a trailing flap of thin material when they are worn. The longer the flap, the more they are worn. On OEM models I seem to recall the trailing flap can get to almost 1/2". On cheaper paddles it falls off sooner and doesn't get as long. However, the type of surface you blow on affects how soon this trailing flap falls off. Broomed concrete will make the fray fall off earlier than unbroomed concrete (like a garage floor). This is why changing your paddles based on the length of the trailing frap leads to inconsistent results.

Having said all this the best test I know you can do even in the summer: 1) start up the machine in your shop or driveway (as long as it is level); 2) engage the augers and tilt it like you are going to blow some snow. If the machine pulls you along behind it slightly (you need to walk quickly to keep up with it), the augers are still OK. Brand new augers will almost pull the machine out of your hands if you are not expecting it. Don't do this for too long as warm augers in the summer on concrete will wear them prematurely.

In the winter you'll know it is time to change when one or more things happen/don't happen. 1) In powdery snow, the machine will just "push" the snow ahead of it; it won't go into the discharge at all. It will remain in a pile in front of the machine; 2) In wet snow it will clog ALL the time; 3) it will shoot the snow a MUCH shorter distance than you expect or remember; 4) the machine doesn't seem to pull you anymore...you seem to have to "push" it around when it is tilted to blow snow.

If any of these tips don't work for you, post a pic of the paddles and I'll look at it. But the summer trick of engaging the augers and ensuring that it pulls you forward noticeably is the most reliable.
 

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They shouldn't touch the ground when the machine is standing upright, only when you tilt it to blow snow. That's what engages the handles and that's what pulls the machine along the pavement (Honda refers to it as semi-propelled). A distance slightly larger than a paint stick (about 3/8") between the paddles and the sidewalk means they are fine. Anything greater means change them. By "width" I am assuming you don't mean thickness—that's not as important. The paddles will fray and leave a trailing flap of thin material when they are worn. The longer the flap, the more they are worn. On OEM models I seem to recall the trailing flap can get to almost 1/2". On cheaper paddles it falls off sooner and doesn't get as long. However, the type of surface you blow on affects how soon this trailing flap falls off. Broomed concrete will make the fray fall off earlier than unbroomed concrete (like a garage floor). This is why changing your paddles based on the length of the trailing frap leads to inconsistent results.

Having said all this the best test I know you can do even in the summer: 1) start up the machine in your shop or driveway (as long as it is level); 2) engage the augers and tilt it like you are going to blow some snow. If the machine pulls you along behind it slightly (you need to walk quickly to keep up with it), the augers are still OK. Brand new augers will almost pull the machine out of your hands if you are not expecting it. Don't do this for too long as warm augers in the summer on concrete will wear them prematurely.

In the winter you'll know it is time to change when one or more things happen/don't happen. 1) In powdery snow, the machine will just "push" the snow ahead of it; it won't go into the discharge at all. It will remain in a pile in front of the machine; 2) In wet snow it will clog ALL the time; 3) it will shoot the snow a MUCH shorter distance than you expect or remember; 4) the machine doesn't seem to pull you anymore...you seem to have to "push" it around when it is tilted to blow snow.

If any of these tips don't work for you, post a pic of the paddles and I'll look at it. But the summer trick of engaging the augers and ensuring that it pulls you forward noticeably is the most reliable.
Thank you very much.
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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They shouldn't touch the ground when the machine is standing upright, only when you tilt it to blow snow. That's what engages the handles and that's what pulls the machine along the pavement (Honda refers to it as semi-propelled). A distance slightly larger than a paint stick (about 3/8") between the paddles and the sidewalk means they are fine. Anything greater means change them. By "width" I am assuming you don't mean thickness—that's not as important. The paddles will fray and leave a trailing flap of thin material when they are worn. The longer the flap, the more they are worn. On OEM models I seem to recall the trailing flap can get to almost 1/2". On cheaper paddles it falls off sooner and doesn't get as long. However, the type of surface you blow on affects how soon this trailing flap falls off. Broomed concrete will make the fray fall off earlier than unbroomed concrete (like a garage floor). This is why changing your paddles based on the length of the trailing frap leads to inconsistent results.

Having said all this the best test I know you can do even in the summer: 1) start up the machine in your shop or driveway (as long as it is level); 2) engage the augers and tilt it like you are going to blow some snow. If the machine pulls you along behind it slightly (you need to walk quickly to keep up with it), the augers are still OK. Brand new augers will almost pull the machine out of your hands if you are not expecting it. Don't do this for too long as warm augers in the summer on concrete will wear them prematurely.

In the winter you'll know it is time to change when one or more things happen/don't happen. 1) In powdery snow, the machine will just "push" the snow ahead of it; it won't go into the discharge at all. It will remain in a pile in front of the machine; 2) In wet snow it will clog ALL the time; 3) it will shoot the snow a MUCH shorter distance than you expect or remember; 4) the machine doesn't seem to pull you anymore...you seem to have to "push" it around when it is tilted to blow snow.

If any of these tips don't work for you, post a pic of the paddles and I'll look at it. But the summer trick of engaging the augers and ensuring that it pulls you forward noticeably is the most reliable.
I think I need new paddles. should have asked about the scraper bar. it seems to be too down. On regular Honda's I adjust about 1/4 inch out. this bar is twice that. tomorrow I'll readjust bar if you think 1/2 inch is too much for scraper. I just don't have hardly any experience with Honda single stages. They are very rare here.

I put the blower on my garage floor, started it and used paddles and nothing. even tipping , nothing. but they really dont show any wear. no flap exposed on the back side. I have seen that on others . so may try adjusting scraper bar down tomorrow and see if it makes any difference.
 

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OK. Odd that there is NO contact. The scrapper bar isn't adjustable. It just seats in place and you will feel it when it seats. If the scrapper bar is too far out it's because it is not installed properly and it could be prevent the augers from contacting the ground properly.
 

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OK. Odd that there is NO contact. The scrapper bar isn't adjustable. It just seats in place and you will feel it when it seats. If the scrapper bar is too far out it's because it is not installed properly and it could be prevent the augers from contacting the ground properly.
What the heck. I went ahead and ordered a new set of OEM paddles and belt. She'll be like a new machine when done. It's a 520 ( with electric start ) and I love the one I used last year for the first winter I ever used a single stage. Totally sold on single stages. Use them more than anything and only bring out the old 80 if i get a foot or more and for the icy berm.

really appreciate your help and advice on this.
 

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Yeah, we're in the same club now. I made fun of single stages 20 yrs. ago but they are my go-to machines now. Last year I didn't even pull out my two stage HSS724 tracked beast. At least in Calgary, the 520 or 720 single stage does the job 90% of the time. Plus, once you get acquainted with them they are pretty easy to fix and maintain. Best of luck :)
 
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