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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have a large piece of HDPE cutting board that was used in a restaurant, maybe 1/2"? 3/4"? thick.

How do I affix it to the bottom of my metal skid shoes?I

I was thinking of using a 1/4" bolt or screw head bolt, drilling two? or three? tight 7/32" holes through 2 layers and the skid shoes, countersinking the head, screwing it in, putting the nut on the inside of the skid shoe. I felt if the hole is tight, and I have to screw it, then when the bolt head wears off, and as the bolt itself wears, the threads will hold the HDPE material together.

Negatives/Problems to this idea please.

P.S. I'll be doing this to MY John Deere 826D first to see how it works out, not sure which one after, if any others at all, here I go again! Crying, LOL

Suggestions?

Other ideas to doing this?
 

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I feel like I may be missing something, so forgive me.

But why not drill 2-3 holes down through the bottom of the metal skid shoe, with corresponding tapped holes into the HDPE (let's assume 1 layer, laying parallel to the driveway). Bolt down through the skid shoe, so that you only have some bolt thread into the HDPE, and it will be recessed from the bottom (driveway) surface of the HDPE. This way only HDPE would contact the driveway, until it wore back far enough that you reached the bolt threads.

As I'm picturing it, the HDPE sheet (with tapped holes) would sit flat against the driveway, and would be bolted into the bottom surface of the metal skid shoe, with the bolt heads against the skid shoe, and the bolts pointing down, into the HDPE.

If you wanted to get fancy, you could maybe use brass or aluminum bolts, so it would be a softer metal that would eventually reach the driveway.

Actually, you can get nylon fasteners, those might be perfect. You could have more thread engagement into the HDPE, by using longer versions (no need to worry about minimizing the thread protrusion into the HDPE), but you would still only have plastic contacting the driveway. They'd be weaker than metal threads, but with a few of them, and/or larger sizes, it would probably be strong enough. If you bought them long enough that they went all the way through the HDPE, you'd even avoid having open tapped holes against the ground, which could maybe get little rocks stuck in the holes, creating a surface-scratching problem.

https://www.homedepot.com/b/Hardware-Fasteners-Screws/Nylon/N-5yc1vZc2b0Z1z0yg7l
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Stupid me, what a great simple idea, tap the HDPE, bolt from the top down, use plastic screws. I'm going to Home Depot tonight to pickup synthetic grease, they have the best price and product from HomeDepot.com. I'll buy the plastic screws/bolts there also. I'll measure the skid shoes, maybe using 3 screws.

I feel like I may be missing something, so forgive me.

But why not drill 2-3 holes down through the bottom of the metal skid shoe, with corresponding tapped holes into the HDPE (let's assume 1 layer, laying parallel to the driveway). Bolt down through the skid shoe, so that you only have some bolt thread into the HDPE, and it will be recessed from the bottom (driveway) surface of the HDPE. This way only HDPE would contact the driveway, until it wore back far enough that you reached the bolt threads.

As I'm picturing it, the HDPE sheet (with tapped holes) would sit flat against the driveway, and would be bolted into the bottom surface of the metal skid shoe, with the bolt heads against the skid shoe, and the bolts pointing down, into the HDPE.

If you wanted to get fancy, you could maybe use brass or aluminum bolts, so it would be a softer metal that would eventually reach the driveway.

Actually, you can get nylon fasteners, those might be perfect. You could have more thread engagement into the HDPE, by using longer versions (no need to worry about minimizing the thread protrusion into the HDPE), but you would still only have plastic contacting the driveway. They'd be weaker than metal threads, but with a few of them, and/or larger sizes, it would probably be strong enough. If you bought them long enough that they went all the way through the HDPE, you'd even avoid having open tapped holes against the ground, which could maybe get little rocks stuck in the holes, creating a surface-scratching problem.

https://www.homedepot.com/b/Hardware-Fasteners-Screws/Nylon/N-5yc1vZc2b0Z1z0yg7l
 

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I just made.my whole skid from HDPE. Also made a set from another composite.. UHMW(?).
 
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I was thinking about mentioning standing the HDPE "upright", like in the video. But the material isn't that thick, so you'd only have 1/2-3/4" against the ground. If you lay it flat, you can get a wider contact surface, which should help it to last longer. I just measured my Ariens poly skids, they are 1.25" thick, for comparison.



Now, you could mount them vertically, like in the video, and stack multiple pieces next to each other, for a thicker contact surface. Just make sure to hold all the pieces firmly against the ground while tightening the bolts, so that you don't end up with 1 piece up in the air, doing nothing.



Or you could drill & bolt the two pieces together, with them aligned so their edges are flush. And then slot them, and mount them to the bucket. That would help keep them aligned, acting as a single, larger piece.
 

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If I were me, I'd make the whole skid out of the HDPE.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Screw it. Tabora posted a link, $12.50-$17, already made. But I have a lot of material, going to cut it out with my jigsaw, one solid piece. I'm going to shape the bottom runners longer with a slight incline so it moves over curbs easier.
 

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You also need to consider is you make that shoe wider so the plastic doesn't wear as fast you could also contribute to it riding up on packed snow.

.
 

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Buy ?? I hate buy !!!

Build !!! It's more fun, and you get to use all your tools.

I build my own shoes from the worn out originals.








Why don't you fab up a similar design but make the ends with through holes and use 1/4" carriage bolts to hold your newly cut HDPE runner inserts. Just a little heat and you can form the HDPE to contour of new shoe.
If you need help let me know, or I can fab you up some. Blast & paint then send'em to ya. About a 2 hr job for me to build.
Sounds like you will then have a lifetime supply of inserts.
 
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I was thinking about mentioning standing the HDPE "upright", like in the video. But the material isn't that thick, so you'd only have 1/2-3/4" against the ground. If you lay it flat, you can get a wider contact surface, which should help it to last longer. I just measured my Ariens poly skids, they are 1.25" thick, for comparison.



Now, you could mount them vertically, like in the video, and stack multiple pieces next to each other, for a thicker contact surface. Just make sure to hold all the pieces firmly against the ground while tightening the bolts, so that you don't end up with 1 piece up in the air, doing nothing.



Or you could drill & bolt the two pieces together, with them aligned so their edges are flush. And then slot them, and mount them to the bucket. That would help keep them aligned, acting as a single, larger piece.
This is pretty much how I make my skids. They are a bit over 1" thick. I clamped them together and screwed them together before shaping and drilling them.
 

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I just made.my whole skid from HDPE. Also made a set from another composite.. UHMW(?).


Same here. I have a big block of 1 inch thick white plastic on both sides of my TORO. I would have rather had black but white cutting board is more common!!
 
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