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these old bones can't take the cold anymore like they used to. have to wait until the temp is in the 20's to go into garage.

thinking about getting some kind of heater but cost is a serious issue.

what do all of you use to heat your shop or work space ? about how much does it cost? the trouble with gas heaters is that you would have to keep the garage door open and an electrical heater would cost a small fortune.

right now i look like the michelin man with all the layers of clothing! my hands and feet take the worse of it.
 

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I bought a 22k btu kerosene heater but found out after buying it that you can't find kerosene at gas station pumps here in Newfoundland anymore. I think its much easier to find down in the States. You can buy kerosene at Home Depot but it costs a fortune. Some folks claim they can burn low sulpur diesel in their kerosene heaters but it actually ruins your wick.
You can buy kerosene torpedo heaters that can burn diesel and kerosene but they're too noisy for my liking.
 

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I have an older home with a detached garage and I always thought it would be nice to find an old pot belly stove on Craigslist and set it up in the corner. Throw in a log every now and then and even cook a meal on the top if I get hungry.
 

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I bought a Dynaglo bullet heater from Home Depot a few years back on a friends recommendation. Looks like they are about $200 now.This particular model runs on diesel or Kero. Mine has a thermostat control on side that works pretty good. There is very little odor when it is running right and it heats a two car garage very quickly.
 

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I have an older home with a detached garage and I always thought it would be nice to find an old pot belly stove on Craigslist and set it up in the corner. Throw in a log every now and then and even cook a meal on the top if I get hungry.
thought of that too. lots of old wood stoves available around here free. that's how we heat our home and cook on in power outages.
 

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I have a 80-120 lb propane tank with a reflective heater on top. Works ok but really need a fan.
 

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Hello Orangeputeh,


It might be better for you to invest in a Mr. Heater propane heater for the garage, you can buy them with a single, double or four head heating elements to burn propane.


I have a Mr. Heater small camp heater and a kerosene fired salamander that I use to heat everything up and to work in the garage. I just make sure the doors are open as it creates a lot of heat in a very short time.


It may be worth your while to invest in a propane fired wall vented forced air heater that runs on 110 volts and you can just plug it in when you want to heat up the garage and it runs on a thermostat.


The insurance companies frown on combustion type heaters of any kind in a garage if a vehicle is also parked in them
unless they are physically separated by a block wall fire resistant sheet rock and steel door.


Have you looked at the smaller electric resistance heaters that are ceiling hung units?
.
 

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I have a 80-120 lb propane tank with a reflective heater on top. Works ok but really need a fan.
maybe you could use one of those fans we put on our wood stove. all steel and works when it heats up. no batteries, nothing. we have to open window because it spreads out the heat so well.

amazing device. we got it as a lightening deal on amazon for 44 bucks. i don't know how to provide link. dinosaur when it comes to computers.
 

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I was going to suggest the same, fan, to go behind your wood stove. If not slow enough Harbor Freight has a speed reducer box.

Put some steel sheets around the stove for reflectivity.

I'm also a believer in a duct damper to slow the burn besides closing the intake air vent.
 

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I use the ceiling hung heater in the corner of garage it is 3500 watt and gets the garage warm very fast.
Hello Orangeputeh,


It might be better for you to invest in a Mr. Heater propane heater for the garage, you can buy them with a single, double or four head heating elements to burn propane.


I have a Mr. Heater small camp heater and a kerosene fired salamander that I use to heat everything up and to work in the garage. I just make sure the doors are open as it creates a lot of heat in a very short time.


It may be worth your while to invest in a propane fired wall vented forced air heater that runs on 110 volts and you can just plug it in when you want to heat up the garage and it runs on a thermostat.


The insurance companies frown on combustion type heaters of any kind in a garage if a vehicle is also parked in them
unless they are physically separated by a block wall fire resistant sheet rock and steel door.


Have you looked at the smaller electric resistance heaters that are ceiling hung units?
.
 

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I used to heat my house with a wood stove. I recently found out how lousy wood stoves actually are in terms of efficiency. 90% of your heat is going up your chimney, and you're only burning a small portion of the available btus in the wood.

Over the past 10 years the 'back to the land' folks how discovered the so-called "Batch Box Rocket Heater".

These wood stoves are so efficient the only thing that comes out of the chimney is a warm moist air. They can be built pretty cheaply using just fire bricks. They're really interesting. Lot of guys building and testing them. Lot of videos on youtube about them.
 

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I hung a Reznor natural-gas-fired space heater from the ceiling and plumbed the combustion air and exhaust gas outside through a common coaxial chimney pipe. That way it doesn't waste heated air and push it out through the roof. It's sorta like a condensing furnace, but the stack is really too short (total about 4') to gain much benefit from the "condensing" function.

We also added a mini-split heat pump. It's primarily to heat and cool my (attached) office suite, and it was simple to add a second head in the garage in a common wall opposite the head in the office. The heat pump SEER rating is much better than the space heater, but the cost of NG is so low right now that it's much more economical to run the space heater.

I doubled the insulation spec on the garage/workbay/office as part of an expansion project, including the doors, so it's not like trying to heat a barn. The workbay generally stays at about 50º without adding heat in winter, thanks to a couple refrigerators and a freezer. The big fridge and the freezer are domesticated, plus there's an undercounter unit with stuff that can't be kept with food. It has adhesives and tape and stuff that lasts a lot longer if kept cold. Among them they contribute enough heat that freezing is not an issue even with outside temps at or slightly below zero. If I'm working out there I bump the thermostat to 65 or so and it's plenty comfortable with a sweatshirt. Otherwise the thermostats for the gas heater stay at 40º for freeze protection. The thermostats are wired through "safety" switches on the big doors, so the heater works only when the doors are closed.

The Big Expense of adding the gas space heater was getting gas to it. The penetration for the vent stack was pretty much painless, with minimum trimming of the roof shingles needed. The furnace controls and fan need 110V from a dedicated circuit per code, easy since the garage/workshop has a dedicated service distribution panel nearby. The workspace is usually not quite clean enough to serve dinner gusts, but is never more than a couple hours of work from that condition. Having heat available makes it almost civilized.

There's a great resource for garage and workshop enthusiasts at Garagejournal.com. There's a dedicated heating and cooling forum there that has tons of information on what folks are doing. There's lots of creativity for sure.

HTH!
 

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what do all of you use to heat your shop or work space ? about how much does it cost? the trouble with gas heaters is that you would have to keep the garage door open
Amazing how that fearmongering continues to keep going around.
Do you open the doors in your house when cooking on the stove?

I grew up with paraffin heaters (British kero) It was never a problem .
Lots of people up here in maine use kero heaters exclusively. The biggest danger was always fire. No longer a danger with the Japanese models that self extinguish.
They've been doing that since the 1970s
, old wives tales die hard.

You're talking about a garage, not an airtight closet.

My kero heater raises the garage temp approx 50 degs. I light it and leave it for an hr. Warm tools are nice.
 

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Back in about 2001 I installed a natural gas 35,000 BTU radiant heater in a 576 sq ft, insulated stand alone garage. Did a large amount of wood working back then. No problem keeping the place warm, even if the outdoor temp was -30C. Never regretted making the investment.
 

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A small 2nd hand cast iron wood stove i got for $100 years back. I burn pallets I collected and cut in the warmer months from local businesses who are happy to be rid of them.

Since wood stoves are not the most efficient things around I have a couple of fans blowing from behind both the stove and the long steel chimney to reclaim some of the heat and spread it out into the garage. Works pretty good and is cheap too.

K
 

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I used to heat my house with a wood stove. I recently found out how lousy wood stoves actually are in terms of efficiency. 90% of your heat is going up your chimney, and you're only burning a small portion of the available btus in the wood.
Agree! Open fires are very inefficient.

Masonry stoves (I've heard there are some in the US), are very efficient. Ours takes 4 hours to heat, we then slide the chimney flap closed and it stays warm for 2-3 days. Keep the house a toasty 22-23°C. From the firebox, the hot smoke/gases pass down ducts towards the bottom of the structure, before going up another duct and out of the traditional chimney.

https://www.google.fi/search?q=leivinuuni&client=firefox-b&dcr=0&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj94frXkJvYAhWPfFAKHZPuABYQ_AUICigB&biw=1216&bih=658

https://mainewoodheat.com/masonry-heaters/
 
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