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Discussion Starter #1
Seems like a quite of bit of metal to me. Looking at trying to move a 1979-1993 model. Tried solo to get it into the back of an old Saab 9000 unsuccessfully.
Any tricks to lighten it so that I can pickup and transport by myself. Loosened the handle bars so the height would work. During that process the lower bolt female receiver moved on the left bar(so that I couldn't bolt the bottom of the arm down) that also has the mechanical connection to the the transmission and any slop in the bar engages a gear. So trying to push it up a ramp didn't work as it would move from neutral and into gear. Suggestions appreciated. Thanks.
 

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Welcome!

I don't have one of those, sorry. Though I'm guessing there may be multiple Toros of that power and bucket size. Is it a Power Shift model, as an example?

I'm going to guess it will weigh at least 225-250 lbs, maybe a bit more. I had a 24" 8hp Ariens that was around 250.

For many blowers, the front half, with the augers, can be removed from the back half with the engine and wheels. If that's the case for this machine, that might be your best bet for significantly reducing the weight that you have to deal with at one time.
 

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I usually put about a 2' x 2' piece of plywood over the back bumper and tilt the machine up so that the bucket (scraper) is resting on the plywood. Then I do a free lift of the machine from the rear by the handlebars. Once the machine gets to near level, you can skid it forward on the plywood.

That way, you are only lifting about 1/2 of the total weight, or about 125 lbs.

Unloading is a reverse process.
 

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Yeah, I think the truck is a good suggestion, though I'm sure you've thought of that already :) But trying to get a 2-stage snowblower into a sedan seems like a daunting task. Even if you make 2 trips.

Perhaps you could remove the handlebars from the main body, though it sounds like you were already trying something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Moved stoves, washing machines, couches in the back of a Saab 9000 with the back seats down. The handle bars were 2-3 inches high for it to fit the opening and headliner. Length no problem. Might have to drop the chute down to close the hatch. Where I got into trouble was undoing the bottom handle bar bolts before I got it into the trunk.
 

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I'm going based on my experience with MTD and Ariens, but no Toros, sorry.

You'd have to remove the belt cover. You'd then likely need to unhook the belts from the engine's pulley. You might need to loosen/remove guides that keep the belts in-position, to get them off the pulley.

Also, before splitting it, check and see if any linkages from the controls also need to be disconnected, like for rotating the chute.

If it has a fuel-shutoff valve, close that before splitting it. The carb may drip as you tilt the engine, and if the fuel valve isn't closed, it might just keep dripping. Preferably, start it, close the fuel shutoff, and run it until the engine dies, to get the gas out of the carb, to further reduce the amount that can drip.
 

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Good idea
thx, was too cheap to pay home depot truck rental fees of about $40
Wow! You're much braver than I am :) I assume you had to bungie-cord/tie the trunk closed?
yup
What to watch for when splitting the machine?
b4 splitting remove auger belt from engine pulley,disconnect chute control rod, might have to remove tires for trunk clearance , protect engine pulley while in trunk if it butts upto trunk lip
 

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Discussion Starter #17 (Edited)
Got the rust beast moved today. Thanks for the advice about splitting the machine.
Found a Toro repair manual on this site.

Pretty easy on this 824. Remove the belt cover, disengage/ remove the auger belt. There are 4 nuts on studs that hold the front end to the engine end. Two are visible when you remove the belt cover. The other two are accessable when you tip the blower on to the auger using a block to hold it then take off the bottom cover where the drive gear is. I think they were 9/16. Before you do this disconnect the shute arm at the shute one bolt. 7/16, ?. Tip the machine upright to get to the bottom panel. 4 bolts I think 3/8 same as the belt cover. The belt just slips off when there is no tension from the control.

Once you have the four nuts off and the belt off the machine just separates. Front end and engine handle bars back end.

Also took the last section of the shute off to make sure it would be under 2' 10" to fit easily in the back of the Saab.

Fit quite easily in my old Saab 9000. Still had 1-2 ft of floor available under the hatch with the two parts forward to the front seats.

Thanks again for everybody's advice. All done and loaded in less than 50 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
Bought a used snowblower when a young teen as it seemed like the place to invest some of my manual shoveling earnings to reduce my physical output per hour. Probably early 60s. Don't remember what I had and don't remember if it paid off. That was my first and only snowblower to this day until this rusted Toro. I do remember it was a difficult machine.
 
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