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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2-stage, but have been thinking about a 1 stage for small snows. My neighbor yesterday said he is thinking about getting a leaf blower for the light snows. I happen to have a 450 CFM leaf blower but had not thought about using it on light snows. How much snow can a leaf blower handle?
 

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Depends on the type of snow.

We sometimes get “frozen snow” (that’s a translation, no idea if it’s right. Edit: “powder snow” could be the right word), which is like a mat of down feathers. A leaf blower could handle 10cm of that no problem.
But wet, sticky snow and the leaf blower won’t move 5mm of the stuff.
 

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I use a Stihl BR600 650cfm backpack blower for light snow. It will easily blow 3-4 inches of light fluffy snow. I have used it for 1 inch wet snow but takes longer to do (rolls snow balls). CFM is not the only thing, blowing force is also important.

I use a hand held blower to clean snow off my vehicles.

I suggest you give it a try before investing in a new snow thrower.
 

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You would need a backpack blower as opposed to a smaller handheld.

I have an Echo 770 and it does the lighter stuff fine ... heck in the fall, it even blows the landscape stones around my house as I am doing leaves if I am not paying attention.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
You would need a backpack blower as opposed to a smaller handheld.

I have an Echo 770 and it does the lighter stuff fine ... heck in the fall, it even blows the landscape stones around my house as I am doing leaves if I am not paying attention.
Hmmm, a good backpack blower costs about the same as a good single stage. I'll try the Milwaukee handheld this season and see how it does for me.
 

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You would need a backpack blower as opposed to a smaller handheld.
I’m using a Makita DUB362 with twin batteries. Works well for powder snow.
Not too noisy.
No fuel needed.
No harness needed.
Not as powerful as a backpack model but if forced to choose again, I would make the same choice. Trading a bit of power for convenience.
 

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"Hmmm, a good backpack blower costs about the same as a good single stage."

Actually, probably more .... But due to my leaves around my house and property, I already had the Echo backpack, so if needed, I could just use that. But in reality, I rarely use it, as if it is only a dusting, I shovel it, if it is more than that, I just run one of my smaller units in a high gear ... :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hmmm, a good backpack blower costs about the same as a good single stage. I'll try the Milwaukee handheld this season and see how it does for me.
FYI... the Milwaukee blower claims 120mph air and 450 CFM.
That puts the performance in the running with these Stihl backpack blowers:
BR350: 75 m/s = 167mph and 740m3/h = 435cfm
BR200: 56 m/s = 125mph and 680m3/h = 400cfm

BR600: 89 m/s = 199mph and 1150m3/h = 677cfm
Echo 770: 234mph and 756 cfm
 

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I don't worry about an inch or 2 of snow, as it will either melt or more white stuff will add to it the next day or so depending on the temperature.
I bring out the snow blower for 3" or more on our 250' driveway.

There are shovel attachments for leaf blowers, hard to say if they work any better than with out the attachment.

 

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Got a dewalt electric leaf blower at my sisters place and it does not even compare to a gas leaf blower. Yes it does move stuff around but not nearly as powerful and only gets about 15 minutes of run time out of a 5ah battery. If you were going to look may be worth looking at project farms channel. He recently did an episode on leaf blowers. I haven't watched it yet but should help you make up your mind if you are looking to buy one
 

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I have a Stihl BG55 (their least expensive model) that gets used far more for blowing snow than the snow blower does. As mentioned earlier it depends on the snow. The snow shovel get used the most.
 

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FYI... the Milwaukee blower claims 120mph air and 450 CFM.
That puts the performance in the running with these Stihl backpack blowers:
BR350: 75 m/s = 167mph and 740m3/h = 435cfm
BR200: 56 m/s = 125mph and 680m3/h = 400cfm

BR600: 89 m/s = 199mph and 1150m3/h = 677cfm
Echo 770: 234mph and 756 cfm
My Greenworks 80V blower is 170MPH & 730CFM but I have not had much luck blowing snow with it except for fluffy stuff on the cars...
There are shovel attachments for leaf blowers
That shovel attachment looks useful, though!
 
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Totally depends on the temperature, which changes the type of snow dramatically.
I would say if it's 20F (minus 7C) or colder while the snow fell, and while you trying to remove it, then a dusting up to 2" of snow is probably doable.

If it's 28F (minus 2C) or warmer, it probably won't work at all..

Scot
 

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I replaced a Craftsman gas-powered hand-carry blower with a plug-electric a couple seasons ago. Immediately sent the gas blower to a new home, as the plug-electric does everything better except manage the cord. The plug-electric leaf blower gets used mostly at its lowest available speed, as it sends more stuff scattering than in the intended direction. Last spring I added a Makita 2-batteries leaf blower to the tool collection, and it's taken over almost all of the yard and driveway cleaning tasks. Way convenient, and again it does most of its work on a lower speed. My yard junk loading is primarily Ponderosa pine cones and needles. K has some decorative river-rock stream beds that get the plug-electric once or twice a year, when the extra power is worth pulling out the extension cord.

Last year I tried the plug-electric leaf blower on a couple inches of average mid-season snow, just at sunrise and low twenties temperature. It would be OK for doing walkways and the like, assuming there's someplace to put the snow without lifting it. For our walkways though, not much room without that lifting, so the leaf blower is a net fail. On the driveway, it's good for snow until it piles up deeper than maybe six inches. I could clear a walk- or drive-path out if I had to, but even mid-density powder here would compress before I could move a couple inches a few feet and end up with too much for the plug-electric leaf blower to move easily.

Reality here is that those couple inches of snow and the need for a path out usually get the shovel. I can push-plow a drive path pretty easily, and come back with the snow blower to do the lifting part. Most of our driveway away from the house and garage is shouldered by retaining walls two to five feet high. Lifting is the heavy work, and I depend on the machine to do that with more than a few inches of anything south of really dry powder.
 
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I, have a RoybI 40 Volt, before that ,I hade a Sthil Blower. On fluffy snow, Either on works well. The nice thing about the RoybI, I can keep in in the basement (there is no gas )I can start blowing right from the back door. When, I worked for the school al the cousdoins would blow the side walks off. It works great to blow the snow off your car. A, big heavy snow, is another story, get out the snow blower. Try it, you gonna like it.
 

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I have a 2-stage, but have been thinking about a 1 stage for small snows. My neighbor yesterday said he is thinking about getting a leaf blower for the light snows. I happen to have a 450 CFM leaf blower but had not thought about using it on light snows. How much snow can a leaf blower handle?
I have the largest Husqvarna backpack blower they make (I believe 1000 FM) and although it will blow a few inches of the light fluffy stuff, anything else is a chore. I thought it would work great for my wrap around porch. It was actually quicker to just grab the shovel and walk everything down to the end and over the side. If you do use it in the winter, make sure you do a good warm-up before going full throttle or you run the risk of seizing it.
 
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