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Fairplane's thread about how to check the oil in the transmission of Honda's HS622 got me to thinking about checking it out in mine.

Thanks to the advise and direction of [email protected], and my local Honda dealer, C.E.I. in Moline, IL, I was able to go at the job knowing what I would have to do. Here's how I went about it today. Sorry for the poor quality photos, and screwy looking arrows I drew on them, but I hope they do the trick.

The shop manual states that the transmission on the HS622 holds 2.0 liter (2.1 qt) of 5W-30 oil.

I store my HS622 on a furniture dolly, so that it is easier to move around in my garage. Sitting on the dolly makes it easier to get a catch pan under it for changing the transmission oil. I won't bother showing a catch pan, but if you do this to yours, make sure it's large enough to hold 2 liter of oil.

The drain plug is located on the back side of the transmission. It can be seen here looking toward the front of the snowblower under the engine. It takes a 12mm socket, and there is an aluminum washer behind it, in case it drops off and you weren't looking for it.



You have to remove the plastic shroud that covers the top of the transmission. There are two bolts, one on either side, and one acorn nut and washer on top of the shroud to take off. They're all 10mm. The shroud will easily bend outward so that you can lift it up past the discharge chute and gas tank.



Next you have to locate and remove the fill plug. It's a round black rubber stopper looking thing on the top left hand side of the transmission as you are facing the front of the snowblower. It's in behind the lever that actuates the auger. It's pretty close quarters, but it comes off easily using the end of a straight bladed screw driver. Just don't poke it too hard.



After the old oil has drained out, re-install the drain plug and it's washer.

Now comes the hard part. Because the fill hole faces sideways, pouring the oil in is a bit tricky. I happened to have a funnel with a tube that has a 1/2" inside diameter on it. I went to the hardware store and got a plastic 1/2" barbed fitting with a 90° in it, and stuck it in the end of the tube.



The fitting slipped in between the auger clutch lever and transmission case, and into the filler hole far enough that I could pour the oil into the funnel without spilling it all over. Sorry I don't have any pictures of that, but holding the funnel with one hand and pouring the oil with the other didn't leave me with any hands to snap a picture.

Once you've put the 2 liter of oil into the transmission, re-install the rubber fill plug. The same flat bladed screw driver you used to get it out will be needed to push it back in. Then you can put the shroud back on, and your HS622 is ready for the next snowfall.
 

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While looking for a transmission oil change thread I came across this one but unfortunately the pictures attached are no longer working so with the help of Google I rescued the pictures.. I'm re-posting the thread with pictures from Google. They should be there for eternity...

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Fairplane's thread about how to check the oil in the transmission of Honda's HS622 got me to thinking about checking it out in mine.

Thanks to the advise and direction of [email protected], and my local Honda dealer, C.E.I. in Moline, IL, I was able to go at the job knowing what I would have to do. Here's how I went about it today. Sorry for the poor quality photos, and screwy looking arrows I drew on them, but I hope they do the trick.

The shop manual states that the transmission on the HS622 holds 2.0 liter (2.1 qt) of 5W-30 oil.

I store my HS622 on a furniture dolly, so that it is easier to move around in my garage. Sitting on the dolly makes it easier to get a catch pan under it for changing the transmission oil. I won't bother showing a catch pan, but if you do this to yours, make sure it's large enough to hold 2 liter of oil.

The drain plug is located on the back side of the transmission. It can be seen here looking toward the front of the snowblower under the engine. It takes a 12mm socket, and there is an aluminum washer behind it, in case it drops off and you weren't looking for it.




You have to remove the plastic shroud that covers the top of the transmission. There are two bolts, one on either side, and one acorn nut and washer on top of the shroud to take off. They're all 10mm. The shroud will easily bend outward so that you can lift it up past the discharge chute and gas tank.



Next you have to locate and remove the fill plug. It's a round black rubber stopper looking thing on the top left hand side of the transmission as you are facing the front of the snowblower. It's in behind the lever that actuates the auger. It's pretty close quarters, but it comes off easily using the end of a straight bladed screw driver. Just don't poke it too hard.



After the old oil has drained out, re-install the drain plug and it's washer.

Now comes the hard part. Because the fill hole faces sideways, pouring the oil in is a bit tricky. I happened to have a funnel with a tube that has a 1/2" inside diameter on it. I went to the hardware store and got a plastic 1/2" barbed fitting with a 90° in it, and stuck it in the end of the tube.



The fitting slipped in between the auger clutch lever and transmission case, and into the filler hole far enough that I could pour the oil into the funnel without spilling it all over. Sorry I don't have any pictures of that, but holding the funnel with one hand and pouring the oil with the other didn't leave me with any hands to snap a picture.

Once you've put the 2 liter of oil into the transmission, re-install the rubber fill plug. The same flat bladed screw driver you used to get it out will be needed to push it back in. Then you can put the shroud back on, and your HS622 is ready for the next snowfall.
 

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Nice write up.
 

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Place it on the front of the bucket. The only problem, is the curved shape of the machine. You would have to use blocks, or rest the handles against the wall.
 

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Maybe a dumb question (this is my first snowblower ever so I'll play the newbie card), can the auger housing (bucket) hold the weight of the machine? I mean the housing is bolted to the transmission and that will hold the weight of the whole machine?
 

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For most machines, this is known as the "service position." This is in part due to the access panel on machines that have more traditional friction plate and drive belt configuration.

Albeit, I have never attempted it with my HS622, I would imagine that our buckets would have no problems, considering lesser material machines do it. The only caveat, is that our buckets are more rounded, so unless you are careful, they will continue to rotate over. You must use something to prevent this, otherwise risk damaging the chute among other things.

I would also recommend doing this on a scrap piece of cardboard, carpet, or rubber mat.
 

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While looking for a transmission oil change thread I came across this one but unfortunately the pictures attached are no longer working so with the help of Google I rescued the pictures.. I'm re-posting the thread with pictures from Google. They should be there for eternity...[QUOTE/]
Can you please post on how you went about resurrecting the photos?
There are other threads where this would come in handy.
 

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While looking for a transmission oil change thread I came across this one but unfortunately the pictures attached are no longer working so with the help of Google I rescued the pictures.. I'm re-posting the thread with pictures from Google. They should be there for eternity...[QUOTE/]
Can you please post on how you went about resurrecting the photos?
There are other threads where this would come in handy.
Sure,
Right click on the missing picture and select copy the URL (I use Chrome on Windows) and select copy URL, paste it in a document and look at the last part which is the file name.
Then search on Google something like I did: Honda HS622 Drainplug.jpg and once the results are showing click on "Images" (to see only pictures) and you should see what Google has cached... then right click on the one you believe is the right one (you can check the file name for better accuracy) and use the URL of the picture in Google when you repost..

Basically search for the image filename and as context use Honda Model

and that's it, let me know if you have problems finding the picture and I'll give it a try..

Good luck!
 

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Because, that is the Honda recommended lubricant for the transmission.

And, it's much cheaper.
 

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I have a 2007 HS 622 TCS I bought used this past summer and noticed it is dripping small amount of light clear thin oily fluid, not sure exactly where it is coming from (?axl seal). Any way it don't look like engine oil.
 

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They may have redesigned the LO for that, or redesigned the transmission for a thinner weight oil. I can not say for certain. I do know that the seals are positioned at the bottom of the lube reservoir, and that the axles are also the most apt to corrode due to proximity to the snow.

I will say that it would have helped if Honda would have sealed and coated the metal prior to installing it.
 

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I wonder how painful it is to install install new seals.
Hopefully there is a process (that is public or published on theweb) with revised parts that fixes that once and for all
 

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I wonder how painful it is to install install new seals.
Hopefully there is a process (that is public or published on theweb) with revised parts that fixes that once and for all
Did you find anything for this?

My front right seal is leaking severely. I haven't been able to find anything yet. This thread helps with knowing what to refill it with and where the plugs are.

EDIT: Nevermind. I searched again and found Oracle's thread on this. Sweet! Doesn't appear to be as hard as I thought. Not as much disassembling as I thought.
 

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I wanted to check if both seals are bad.. but just one, good so I save $$.
I'll order tomorrow and will install during the weekend. Thanks for the reminder!

Did you find anything for this?

My front right seal is leaking severely. I haven't been able to find anything yet. This thread helps with knowing what to refill it with and where the plugs are.

EDIT: Nevermind. I searched again and found Oracle's thread on this. Sweet! Doesn't appear to be as hard as I thought. Not as much disassembling as I thought.
 

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I wanted to check if both seals are bad.. but just one, good so I save $$.
I'll order tomorrow and will install during the weekend. Thanks for the reminder!
Many would urge to change both seals since you have everything dismantled and ready. Just a thought
 
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