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Hello, I have a snapper snowblower model number I4233 serial number 55077757. I need to replace the tube brake. Has anybody ever done this? How in the world do you get in there to change this thing? I think I have to take the whole thing apart. Thanks I am stumped.
 

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Found it under clutch system parts. It is item # 28 and appears to be a piece of rubber hose? Part # 29 is a cotter pin and maybe removing that will help move the arm???

Thanks to db for finding the parts list.
 

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Even with the top pulley out its hard to get to. I took the back off can't get in there that way. I think I am going to take the front housing off and try that.
 

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Even with the top pulley out its hard to get to. I took the back off can't get in there that way. I think I am going to take the front housing off and try that.
I have the same machine, nothing but a chunk of hose that slips over a stand-off. I replace mine when I do belts with the front housing off. I believe 5/16 fuel hose works well.
See also impeller won’t stop spinning thread from a week or so back, use the search function when you are logged in and it will come up.
Actually, I see that was your post.
 

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What the heck is that part for? Just to avoid metal to metal contact? To take a little sound away?
I believe it is a brake pad to stop the auger pulley from turning when disengaging.
 

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I believe it is a brake pad to stop the auger pulley from turning when disengaging.
100% right on, the idler that tensions the blower belt and the tube brake are on the same bell-crank at opposite ends. Pull down on the lever and the brake lifts off the blower pulley and the idler pushes the belt tight, let it go and the and its vise versa. Very basic but effective.
I have had this machine 20+ years and know it intimately.
 

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100% right on, the idler that tensions the blower belt and the tube brake are on the same bell-crank at opposite ends. Pull down on the lever and the brake lifts off the blower pulley and the idler pushes the belt tight, let it go and the and its vise versa. Very basic but effective.
I have had this machine 20+ years and know it intimately.
Great feedback you gave to the OP. Don't have this machine but am always impressed when something is designed simply and can maintained without hassle many years forward. Good read!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
thanks for the info. bnurczyk that's what I needed to know. Now to take the front housing off. It seems like a lot of work just to replace that little piece of hose.
 

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thanks for the info. bnurczyk that's what I needed to know. Now to take the front housing off. It seems like a lot of work just to replace that little piece of hose.
Yep, just went out and pulled my belt cover and had a look down at the tube brake, no room to do much. If you already have issues with the impeller not stopping you may as well "bite the bullet" and do belts at the same time.
As stated in the prior thread stick with an OE belt or a belt for clutching applications. Its really not a bad job, I stand mine on its nose and pull the bottom pan. Set it down on its wheels and pull the belt cover and the remaining 6 bolts that hold it all together. Once in two pieces its easy to get at the brake and replace the belts. The hardest part of the whole job is mating the two halves back together with the belts flopping around. I put the blower belt around the bottom pulley and then put a plastic wire tie over the belt to hold it on the pulley. And as it goes back together you have to push on the idler to pull the brake back so the pulley and belt goes under it. As you finagle it back together cut the tie off and get the belt over the motor pulley. Sounds worse than it actually is, just make sure you have a good helper holding the handle bars steady for you. It always take longer the first time but I bet if motivated I could do mine in less than an hour. Also forgot; you have to pull the chute control.
 

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The augers on my machine wouldn't disengage so I replaced the belts. I understand exactly what bnurczyk described when I was trying to get it back together. To my dismay the auger still wouldn't disengage. After reading this I have decided that the tube brake must be at fault. I hope I can replace it by just taking the belly pan off because I don't want to take it apart again anytime soon.
 

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The augers on my machine wouldn't disengage so I replaced the belts. I understand exactly what bnurczyk described when I was trying to get it back together. To my dismay the auger still wouldn't disengage. After reading this I have decided that the tube brake must be at fault. I hope I can replace it by just taking the belly pan off because I don't want to take it apart again anytime soon.
Even when my brake was severely worn the auger would stop - eventually.
The only time my blower would not disengage is when I had the "standard" belt on it. Did you go with the Snapper belt? or did you have the local auto parts store "match one up" for you? That alone could be the issue. (A 4L350 is a standard belt, a 4LK350 is for clutching apps., double check your actual part number) The only other thing that would cause blower run-on would be idler and cable adjustments. Here is a link to the full manual with those adjustments;
http://www.outdoordistributors.com/pdf/Snapper/07014.pdf If you had the wrong belt or lots of run-on for other reasons the tube brake will be fried.
Don't be discouraged, these are good machines. Ours are going to have there 30th birthday this year, that alone says something:D
If you get the tube brake changed without taking it apart let me know how you did it. Looks to me like you will need to grow some extra joints in your fingers!!
PS seeing your machine with a fresh coat of paint makes me want to do mine, looks great!
 

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The belt I had on there was a standard belt. The replacement belt was a snapper belt and I double checked the part number. I guess that I will just have to adjust it. I will replace the tube brake to be on the safe side . Thanks for the manual and the compliment.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
The answer is that you do have to separate the front from the back in order to get this part on. Really wasn't that hard.
 

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Even when my brake was severely worn the auger would stop - eventually.
The only time my blower would not disengage is when I had the "standard" belt on it. Did you go with the Snapper belt? or did you have the local auto parts store "match one up" for you? That alone could be the issue. (A 4L350 is a standard belt, a 4LK350 is for clutching apps., double check your actual part number) The only other thing that would cause blower run-on would be idler and cable adjustments. Here is a link to the full manual with those adjustments;
Outdoordistributors.com If you had the wrong belt or lots of run-on for other reasons the tube brake will be fried.
Don't be discouraged, these are good machines. Ours are going to have there 30th birthday this year, that alone says something:D
If you get the tube brake changed without taking it apart let me know how you did it. Looks to me like you will need to grow some extra joints in your fingers!!
PS seeing your machine with a fresh coat of paint makes me want to do mine, looks great!
I know this an old post but I have a 30 year old Snapper 524 and I just did some maintenance e.g. new fuel line, new drive and auger belts, and a new brake tube. I replaced the brake tube without braking the machine apart. I removed the bottom cover, the belt cover, and the auger belt tension wheel. Machine on its nose. I reached in with 2 hands....left hand from the bottom and right hand from the top. Positioned the tube and pushed it upward. Once It was on the very bottom I pried it upwards with a screw driver and flat bar. I got it on but it took a lot of prying. I don't recommend this method and next time will break the machine apart......which I will be doing because as part of the adjustment process I did wear down the new tube......this may have happened due some lubricant getting on the tube and reducing the friction between the tube and auger belt. After I cleaned the auger belt and what was left of the brake tube the brake did work. But, I'm on a roll and bought some tubing at an auto parts store ($.37/inch) and will replace the pricey tube I bought online ($10.10/inch + $7.00 shipping and handling.)
 
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