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Discussion Starter #1
Does anyone have a telephone number to the actual John Deere Factory service techs? I've talked to the local dealers about my old J.D. 1032 and it's impeller bearing replacement. I gave them all the numbers off the machine tag but they can't figure out the year it was made either!
They can't seem to get it right. I'd rather call the factory Techs'. Thanks.
 

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If it's a real John Deere and not a Ariens, Murray, or Frontier, mine is a 1983. You can use that as a guide. I called the factory several times with my model # and serial # to find out the year to no avail. They did not have it listed and said I must be making a mistake. I called my local John Deere dealer giving them those same numbers and they had no problem finding it, listing as a 1983. Someone in the past two weeks posted a service manual for it that was very intensive. Parts are very expensive through John Deere, I suggest removing the bearing, measuring it, search for those specs finding a replacement from another manufacturer, even a 2nd party.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Well, I returned the replacement bearing/housing to the parts dealer. Later in the day, after they called J.D....J.D. said to just mill the part of the bronze bushing that was protruding to far out of the flange housing and call it good. so that is what they did. I'm to pick it up again.... tomorrow. Guys... you don't have to replace the whole assembly...just get a new bronze bushing pressed in place of the worn one... a LOT less money.
 

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Unless the housing is ruined, you only need the bushing and almost any 1 inch ID "bronze" oil impregnated bushing will work. If it's too long you can cut it to fit. I think I even used a flanged one and ground off the flange part.

Well, I returned the replacement bearing/housing to the parts dealer. Later in the day, after they called J.D....J.D. said to just mill the part of the bronze bushing that was protruding to far out of the flange housing and call it good. so that is what they did. I'm to pick it up again.... tomorrow. Guys... you don't have to replace the whole assembly...just get a new bronze bushing pressed in place of the worn one... a LOT less money.
Not surprising, jt told you what to do. He knows those machines better than anyone here.
 

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I have not done that exact piece, but here's a process I've used on a couple of similar items that made assembly go easier.
Put the bushing in the freezer over night. Put the housing in the oven at maybe 150 degrees or so for 15-30 minutes (depends on the material). With some good gloves on (I prefer welders gloves), pull both out and slide the bushing into the housing. I did one where I literally pushed the bushing all the way in by hand. Others I used a piece of wood to finish pushing it in. Once it cooled it was in there tight so get it lined up and keep it there while it cools.


Some people say to dunk them in water to cool, I prefer to let them air cool. I think it puts less stress on the parts than dunking does but that's just me.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I did buy one just like that and the bushing was too long. It interfered with the wood-ruff key. I had the dealer mill the bushing down to be flush with the main aluminum casting. Now it fits like it should. I was hoping to drill and insert a grease zerk into the casting to occasionally lube the bushing/bearing. Then I realized this wouldn't be much use since the main surface area on the casing is inside the impeller tunnel. I still have my old bushing assembly and plan on having the bronze bushing replaced and keeping it as a spare.
 

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I did buy one just like that and the bushing was too long. It interfered with the wood-ruff key. I had the dealer mill the bushing down to be flush with the main aluminum casting. Now it fits like it should. I was hoping to drill and insert a grease zerk into the casting to occasionally lube the bushing/bearing. Then I realized this wouldn't be much use since the main surface area on the casing is inside the impeller tunnel. I still have my old bushing assembly and plan on having the bronze bushing replaced and keeping it as a spare.
Again, I don't know JD Blowers, some tractors yes but no on blowers. If I'm understanding this right, the bushing mounts between the inside of the auger housing and the impeller. If that's accurate, how much room do you have between the auger housing and the pulley? Could it be placed on the outside of the housing on the pulley side instead (assuming there's sufficient room)?

Now for an idea that might get sticks and rocks thrown at me. If you really want to add a zerk and the bushing has to be on the inside. Consider punching a hole in the impeller housing aligned with where the zerk would be. You could insert a grease gun in to lube it. Make a small cover for the hole that bolts down to cover the hole when not in use. If it really needs lubing that might be a way to accomplish it. If that doesn't work, maybe swap out the bushing for a sealed flange bearing if you can find one that fit in that space.

Just some thoughts.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
With the auger/impeller shaft protruding out the back of the impeller tunnel, the bearing is inserted onto the shaft from the back, and into a hole at the back of the impeller. This keep the shaft centered and anchored in place. On the opposite side of the back wall is the main pulley that drives the auger and impeller. Once that is in place, I can get serious about putting the two halves back together.
I did think about drilling a larger hole to access the zerk and use a rubber plug to keep the hole sealed when not in use... I may still do that but for now, I'll just use it the way it was designed. I already have the zerk mounted in the event I get the gumpsion to actually do it.
I saw an impeller improvement kit that adds thick rubber paddles onto the impeller blades to get more diameter to the impeller for more snow moving power and it'll keep the tunnel cleaner. It's only around $40.00. Looks very interesting. I believe a guy on Gibson implements site has them. I'm eager to get this thing going, snow or not.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
That's what I'm thinking.... but right now, I'm having a hard time with a lever style brake. It is supported over the main pulley that drives the auger and impeller. When you release the control handle to put it in neutral... the spring loaded lever (it has a h.d. rubber piece that will then press on the pulley) stops the auger/impeller quicker. For the life of me I can't find where the spring attaches on the snowblower. I know where it attaches to the lever but I find NO place for the other end of the spring to attach.
Today, I worked the handles to engage and disengage the auger assembly... but the lever never did lift off the auger pulley... There is a spring loaded tensioner that has a separate round plate on it that is supposed to lift the lever when the tension is released but even after I adjusted it to get maximum lift it still doesn't move the brake lever. I'm baffled. I'm going to the dealer tomorrow. I'm at a loss and I find NO literature or information on the web about this.
 

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In regards to the auger brake spring, I can offer the following observation. In order to split one of the Horicon built JD blowers, the plastic belt guard is first removed. The two bolts that secure the front auger housing to the rear engine housing are then removed. Those bolts thread into small tabs that have been welded to the auger housing. The long end of the auger brake spring hooks under the right side tab. I took a picture, but for some reason I'm having trouble posting it.

John Deere Parts Catalogue PC1250 covers the Horicon-built JD snowblowers. Right near the front of the catalogue on Pages 1A and 1B, serial number ranges are provided to assist in determining the year of manufacture. It covers 526, 726, 732, 832, 826 and 1032 models. Generally speaking, production started in 1971 and ended in 1989. However, each model was built only for a specific number of years within that range. For example, the 726 was built from 1971 - 1978 and the 1032 from 1979 - 1989. Very helpful information. The JD Technical Manual for these snowblowers is TM-1234. These two manuals are a must have in addition to the Operator's Manual.

If the bushing that supports the high speed fan shaft (just in front of the large pulley) is wearing out prematurely, it may be that the engaged belt tension is too high. Those bushings should last a long time and are readily available from bearing supply shops (exact size). Unfortunately, the new style triangular bushing housing will only fit the rear of the housing to support the high speed fan shaft. Without modifications being made, the new style housing does not fit the left and right sides of the blower housing to support the front auger shaft.

I've very thoroughly gone through many of these JD blowers (restoration), so am quite familiar with them. If you have any questions, I'll try to help. These machines IMO are absolutely some of the best if not the best snowblowers ever built and are worth repairing except in the odd case where they are damaged beyond the point of no return. Even then, for the most part, they are invaluable as a parts machine.

Hope this may be helpful.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I did hear from the factory rep via email and he told me I own a 1980 model 1032. So knowing the year is helpful.

I have the new (milled down) Impeller Bushing assembly in place and it fits great!

The spring loaded brake lever that stops the auger assembly after the operator releases the tension is working good. I ended up drilling a hole to hook the spring. It seems to work well. I made a rubber piece to fit the lever and it works pretty well once I trimmed it down to fit the contour of the belt/pulley.... Saved me a lot of money to.

With that done, I got it to fire up... runs a bit rough so I'll check the carburetor soon. While it was running, I put it in gear but it doesn't want to move. The clearance adjustment of the friction disc and wheel is within the specs ( 1/16" ) . It's also centered on the disc. The drive disc has plenty of rubber but it is a bit glazed. I don't know if that's the problem or not.
While working on that, I noticed that the wheels don't spin independently without force. The tension wing nut on the wheel is plenty loose so that wasn't
the problem. Tipping it up on the auger housing, I opened the belly pan and spun them. Still pretty hard to move. I'm thinking the axles are corroded and seized. I tried a long time, to punch the pins out. The one on the right is moving but the pin nearest the differential appears to be a solid pin and not a roll pin. I tried a long time using a punch and bigger hammer to drive it out to no avail.
Anyone have any ideas how to get that pin out? I've already bent a good punch on it. I've soaked it in P.B. Blaster but still no movement. I do not have torches and I'd be afraid to heat it too much being so close to the differential.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Just a follow up on my last entry... Once the dealer tech managed to remove the solid axle pin holding the inner and outer axles in place, I removed them and discovered they were almost seized up upon each other. With a little elbow grease and a bigger hammer, I managed to get them apart. Luckily for me the rust wasn't enough to damage anything... Once I had the inner and outer axles components cleaned and lubed, I put them back together, finished the rest of the installation and it now runs, turns, drives very well. Thank you and Snowblower forum for helping me out in my efforts to do it myself and learn from it... you've been very helpful.
 
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