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Discussion Starter #1
I know there have been a lot of threads about the addition of a rubber wiper to the impeller. I tried searching to see if this question was asked anywhere but could not find it.

I saw a vendor who sells this kit offering a 3/8 inch rubber. The instructions were to mounted on the leading edge of the impeller blade. With the thickness of the bracket and rubber, this would make a just under half inch step on the blade. Being on the leading edge, I am wondering if this would trap a lot of snow and slush that would normally slide off the edge of the impeller blade.
Has anybody done it this way and can give me some feedback?
Thank you.
Ringwood.
 

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I use Tractor Supply Baling Belt with Very Good Results. I can't believe people will pay big money for some rubber strips and a handful of hardware.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
How thick of a rubber piece and metal bracket do you use, and you put it on the leading edge or trailing edge? Thank you
 

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The idea of the rubber wiper is to close the gap between the end of the impeller blade, and the impeller housing. This gap can vary between machines, but is often over 1/2 inch. This space allows leakage, especially of wet slushy snow past the blade and reduces the distance that it will throw, and causes clogging of the chute.

The kit does improve throwing distance, and the centrifugal force of the impeller tends to keep the blades reasonably clean. Certainly no worse than without the kit, where you might find a layer of ice coating the housing after blowing wet snow. With the increased velocity, it also seems to prevent clogging of the chute.

I have heard that some people end up with some frozen snow problems which might keep the augers and impeller from spinning if the machine is left with a lot of snow in the bucket after working, but if you clear out the bucket with the tool after working, that should not be a huge problem, plus it keeps from having huge puddles in the garage or shed from melting snow. Event without the kit, frozen snow and ice can cause problems.

I put the kit in in the fall, and the few times that I have needed the machine so far this winter, it does a better job of clearing wet sloppy snow, and also seems to pump water pretty well. The gap on my machine was about 3/8" and I closed it down to about 1/16" to clear some bolt heads, and try and keep the paint on the impeller housing.

I used a reinforced rubber mudflap from a truck, and for hardware, I had to use #14 self tapping bolts and fender washers instead of the metal brackets. I used the self tapping because my impeller has reinforcing ridges stamped into the blades, and that made it difficult to use bolts, and nuts as the holes came too close to the ridges so they would not have sat flat when tightened. So far, no problems and nothing has come loose.
 

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How thick of a rubber piece and metal bracket do you use, and you put it on the leading edge or trailing edge? Thank you

Mine are 3/8 thick, and the go on the top surface of the impeller. Check youtube as there are several good videos showing how its done.
 

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TSC baling belt is probably 1/4" thick, maybe a bit more. Perforated metal strips are cheap as well. Here's an example.

 

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I know there have been a lot of threads about the addition of a rubber wiper to the impeller. I tried searching to see if this question was asked anywhere but could not find it.

I saw a vendor who sells this kit offering a 3/8 inch rubber. The instructions were to mounted on the leading edge of the impeller blade. With the thickness of the bracket and rubber, this would make a just under half inch step on the blade. Being on the leading edge, I am wondering if this would trap a lot of snow and slush that would normally slide off the edge of the impeller blade.
Has anybody done it this way and can give me some feedback?
Thank you.
Ringwood.
I hear what you are saying and with the thicker kits there is probably a little bit of snow trapped against the shoulder. In reality It's probably just a wedge of material at most and of no consequence. Centrifugal force will drive most snow up, over and past the shoulder.

Pete
 

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I use Tractor Supply Baling Belt with Very Good Results. I can't believe people will pay big money for some rubber strips and a handful of hardware.
You can see that it does happen.
Perhaps you may consider selling your own kit (with baler belting) at a better price than the "rubber wipers".
 

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I used the sidewall of an old truck tire, cut them to fit the impeller ends. Drilled two holes near the end of each impeller blade and installed them with short bolts and washers....Did it make a difference in throwing distance, YES. Is it worth doing, YES.
 

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i buy the toro s200 paddles listed above. its enough to do two or threee snowblowers usually. i haven't tried the bailer belt but i heard it works just as well. cut the rubber with an angle grinder with a cutoff wheel
 

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I use Tractor Supply Baling Belt with Very Good Results. I can't believe people will pay big money for some rubber strips and a handful of hardware.
I think Americans have lost an element of ingenuity in being able to think for themselves.

If I'm not mistaken, more Patents were applied for by the Japanese and by the Chinese last year (separately, not combined) than by the Americans.

That says something about the future.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Thanks for all the input. I decided to start this as a DIY project.

I had some scrap 1x 1/8 metal from an old shelf bracket that I cut and drilled. After cutting them, and before drilling, I clamped them together in the vice grips and ground them to the same length so the weight would be the same. I will be using 1/4" stainless button head screws and lock nuts.

I found some 3/8 Buna N, 70 dorometer rubber on ebay. I decided to go with Buna N because it wears well and has the best resistance to oil and gas. Primarily because I plan on spraying down the paddles and housing with WD 40 to help prevent rust and possibly help freeze up.

I will post more as the project moves along.
 

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Before you begin cutting your material, I thought you might want to consider a minor modification by reviewing what I did last year:

http://www.snowblowerforum.com/forum/mtd-snowblowers/83889-mtd-impeller-mod.html

Since you seem to be expecting to keep this machine, and are concerned about avoiding rust and want the ability to disassemble the paddles in the future, I was thinking similarly, and created those ¾" "slots" in mine instead of holes, so that I can advance the pads once a year to address their wear.

That rear bolt just serves as a keel, to make sure I advance the paddle straight, because I'll be doing that advancement in the blind (I'm NOT going to remove the Impeller just to advance the Paddles). So far this year, they've just gotten themselves seated.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks for the hint regarding cutting slots in the rubber. That makes great sense and I will do that. This snow blower is a Ariens 824 and I've had it since it was new in the late eighties. I haven't done much other than keep the gearbox lubricated. I just took it apart to replace bushings and bearings. It will definitely be easier to do this mod with the impellers on the bench! I couldn't imagine trying to get an accurate line up working through the shute hole.

Threaded stainless hardware is the only way to go if you plan on keeping the machine. Self jamming screws will quickly rust and if ever needed to be removed will just snap off and you willby be left with a project if you wanted to replace the rubbers.
 

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I used these on my ariens and put them on all 4 impeller blades. they were the size I needed and were thick and reinforced and cheap . I also put the slots in them to adjust as needed. as the other poster did . Honda 72443V10020 Rubber Impeller I put them on the backside of the impeller blades when I had the auger and impeller disassembled . I was not worried about them bending under the force with the steel plates backing them and of the thickness 1/4", and the small amount actually sticking out to close the gap. there is no give by putting them on the back side. i also cut square holes in the impeller to use carriage bolts, so I would have nice rounded bolts and a smooth flow from the center to the outer edge of the impeller blades to help prevent ice build-up, and used nylock nuts to prevent possible loosening from vibration. i was skeptical of this (see thread), but this is the best mod imho that can be done. I went through the heaviest wettest, slushy muck, some over a foot deep without even a whimper, or the slightest bit of clogging. worth doing
 

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Discussion Starter #16
On the back side of my Ariens impeller, the welded support leaves only about 1/2 inch lip at most. Was the bracket and rubber able to fit in this small area?
 
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