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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Not sure if these go bad. The only way I know to check them is, by trying to turn the impeller by hand. Never, replaced any, looks like it could be a bear of a job.
 

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If they're really roll pins (not shear pins/bolts?), the most important thing is to use the proper size punch, and one that's nicely squared up at the business end. A 3 lb. hammer, and soak 'em down with your favorite veenerschlippen for a day or two before. A few choice words later... bingo.

Pays to pull and replace or at least check sooner than later, lest they become really stuck.
 

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Any roll pin should be removed and installed with the Roll Pin Punches specifically for the size of pin .... they are made with a special ball tip, and designed to go in and out of the pin hole easily, and not mushrooming the end of the pin.

As mentioned, you want to give them a good while to soak in some penetrating oil first. They can also shear, but look fine from a visual and even act like they work with no load, but under load, they will cease to perform.

In areas where there is just one pin, and if it sheared and left both ends still in the item attached, you may have to fiddle to line up and punch out .... that requires a "feel" and patience.

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for telling me how to remove the roll pins. What I, need to know is, what is the best way to check them to see if they are still good, and do not need repalced.
 

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Thanks for telling me how to remove the roll pins. What I, need to know is, what is the best way to check them to see if they are still good, and do not need repalced.
To remove them and see. :whistle:

That said if they come out without too much fuss they were probably OK, but now you should put new ones in anyhow. And if they were rusted/kinked you'll know when you get to banging 'em outta there.

I've never used specific roll pin punches... just regular ones that fit the hole bore just right. I'll have to check those out. 🍻
 

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Believe me, you will certainly know when an impeller sheer pin is no longer working .... as I mentioned, it will probably look fine and even spin with no snow being forced into it by the augers. But when you start using it and the augers are feeding the impeller and it no longer spins, and is all jammed up, you'll know then.

If you have any doubts, or want peace of mind, just remove them and re-install them. I have seen impeller shear pins break, but not very often

That punch set can be had for under 10.00, and is very useful when dismantling or re-installing roll pins of all sizes. I am using mine frequently when repairing things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I, have a Snapper 8265, I bought at a garage sale. Been working on it to use this winter. Went over it, replaced the belts and did all the maintenance that was needed. It starts and runs well. Every thing seems to be in order. I tryed to spin the impeller by hand, by holding the auger with the other hand to see if it would move or spin. No it did not It seems to be fine. It looks to me to revove those pins, I, am going to need to break the blower in half to get to the impeller. Really do not want to do that, if there is a better way to check the pins. Waiting untill it snows and I need it, that is why I am asking how to check these
 

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I see no reason they would not be fine .... as I mentioned, they are usually there mostly for assembly and disassembly purposes, and is not a normal wear or breakage item.

I would still pick up that roll pin set, especially if you plan on working around small equipment, or repairing all sorts of stuff.

One of my machines I have is a Snapper 824, which I restored and will be trying it out this year for first time as well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I see no reason they would not be fine .... as I mentioned, they are usually there mostly for assembly and disassembly purposes, and is not a normal wear or breakage item.

I would still pick up that roll pin set, especially if you plan on working around small equipment, or repairing all sorts of stuff.

One of my machines I have is a Snapper 824, which I restored and will be trying it out this year for first time as well.
Thanks, that is pretty much what I need to know. I will pick up the punches.
 

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Hollow roll pins do not need to be removed to inspect them. One method is selecting a drill bit that will fit inside the pin and gently twisting it back and forth in your fingertips until it passes through. If the roll pin is straight, it is still good. Or you can put a flashlight on one end and look down the bore. A good pin will be evident. Only caveat is make sure there is no rust, crud, dirt or insect nests inside before hand. Hence, I start with the drill bit.
 
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ALL roll pins when inserted should have graphite Never-Seize on them.

The roll pin set Oneacer showed should be used with hollow roll pins as the ball fits inside the hollow, for solid roll pins use the largest regular punch that easily fits inside the hole. The correct punch size allows more force to be distributed over a larger area making removal of the pin easier, yea sure.
 
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I have had to remove roll pins that are rolled as stated above, you will need the punches with the bubble on the end. I went one farther and picked up the punches that work in an air chisel, that was the only way I was able to remove the pin. This was on a drive shaft yoke in a hard to get at place, I had tried with punch and 3 pound hammer with no effect, air chisel and it walked right out. Just don’t go to far with the chisel or it will get stuck, don’t ask how I know.
 

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Yes, as far as I know its for a standard air hammer. My air chisel is nothing special and not a high-end tool. But it gets what I ask of it done, Im sure there is better ones out there.
 
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