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Has anyone used JB Weld to repair a worn axel? I used JB Weld to fill-in and resurface a worn axel caused by a seized bearing. I don't have a lathe so I used my drill, a vise and a 2-inch grinder to cleanup and square off the wear groove. I then cleaned with acetone and built-up with three coats of JB Weld (compressive strength 4,000 PSI). I sanded starting with 120 grit and ending with 1200 wet paper. Seems to work fine. I think it will get me through the winter, but I wonder how much longer it will last.

I attached a picture before the final sanding.
 

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Take it apart when season is over, and let us know how it is holding up. I wouldn't be surprised if it lasts for seasons to come if you keep it lubed.
 
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Take it apart when season is over, and let us know how it is holding up. I wouldn't be surprised if it lasts for seasons to come if you keep it lubed.
Agree. I did the same process to the shaft that runs between the pulley and friction wheel once where it got cut from a bad bushing. Only thing I could suggest is let it set up 'well' prior to putting it back into use. Being it's a bearing, long as the new bearing is good and fits properly on the shaft with no extra play, I'd expect it to hold a long time.

Two other fixes available but one is out due to contamination. First is referred to as spatter welding. Proper machine shop with the right equipment shoots molten metal onto the worn area. Once enough material is deposited into the worn area it's then turned in a lathe back to the original dimensions. Very permanent and solid.
The other one I've seen is turn the worn area down in a lathe, a suitably sized sleeve is split and either glued in via something like JB Weld or welded in. Once in, it again is turned down on a lathe to the correct dimensions.
 
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