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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Okay I’m hoping that it’s nothing too serious...! We just got our first major snow of the season, around 6”. I fired up our brand-new 1022ER and cleared the driveway and front sidewalk easily. Then I tried to clear the back sidewalk, but didn’t realize that there was a heavy rubberized mat under all the snow. I hit it and the snowblower shut down. I tried to restart it, but it was a no go. I didn’t even think to try the electric starter. The starter rope still has tension and can be pulled, but it won’t turn over.

I’m nominally mechanically inclined, but don’t want to call the shop if it’s an easy fix. I tried doing Google and YouTube searches, no luck. Would this be a sheared flywheel pin? What would I want to look for, and where would I look? Thanks!
 

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I'll take "Sheared a Flywheel Key" for $200 Alex.
 

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Probably not something I can easily fix, darn it. Looks like I’ll have to call a repair shop.
If that's the issue, it can likely be fixed in an hour or less... Just need to pull the flywheel and replace the key. I've done it on an outboard with only a crescent wrench, a block of wood and a hammer, but a puller makes it easier! You can usually borrow those at auto parts dealers, or you can purchase a Briggs-specific one cheaply at Walmart, eBay, etc.
Here's a video on flywheel key replacement:
 

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have you tried pulling the belt cover off and turn the main pulley counter clockwise? also have you made sure to remove the rubber mat and made sure the impeller spins freely? these are the 2 things i would look at first before taking it to a shop. i don't think you would have shear the flywheel key on getting something stuck but if your B&S is like mine you could have maybe broke the pull start if you tried to force the engine over with it since it is all plastic.
 

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I agree with the previous comment. I would not automatically take it to a repair shop without first doing a little bit of troubleshooting. You made the comment "The starter rope still has tension and can be pulled, but it won’t turn over.". I may have read that wrong. I read it as I pull the rope and the engine turns (spins), but does not start. Did you mean - you pull the rope and the engine does not even spin?

If the engine does turn when you pull the rope, I would pull the spark plug and check and see if you have spark.
 

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snow blower motors don't have them, only found on lawnmowers with solid crankshafts not using soft blade adapters
Someone better tell my snowblowers. How are they timed without the key?
 
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Yeah, every small engine I ever encountered had a flywheel key ... BTW, even if it just bent it, without a clear shear, that is all it takes for a dead machine....
Truth. Even a very small offset will stop your machine. It really doesn't take much. :surprise:
 

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If you've freed the mat and inspected the rotors and housing for damage and distortion and everything seems fine you should pull the spark plug and crank the engine over some. Enough to blow out any gas that may have accumulated. You'd do this with the choke off and the throttle full. It would also give you a chance to check to see if you have spark. You could also let it sit with the plug out and try turning it over a few times every so often just so you know you're starting from a base line.
Once you've checked for spark and you're confident it's not flooded install the spark plug and with full throttle, without choke give it a couple pulls to see if it starts. If not then choke it and try. If not then hit the primer with choke and try.
If it still doesn't start I would also be inclined to then recommend you either pull the flywheel to check that key if you feel comfortable after a couple how to youtubes or take it in.

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Every sheared key ive ever seen you could still pull not the key being the reason it wont pull for 600 alex
 

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horizontal shaft motors use a solid steel flywheel key, unlike vertical shaft lawn mowers and even then some use a solid with a shear/breakaway blade adapter that shears saving a bent crankshaft
 

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All of my horizontal engines have either a aluminum or composite metal (soft) flywheel key. Even my new simplicity with a 205cc briggs 900 snow series engine has a aluminum Key not a solid steel. Thats not saying that there is not a Mfg. who specs it ( a solid steel key) for a particular engine, or purpose.
But it is not a Horizontal rule, for all engines.
As well if I find solid steel Keys in a engine I double check with Mfg. parts to make sure its supposed to be in there and why? For if that engine is not being used for the intended reason for a solid steel key I pull it and put in a soft key. A $2.00 key is a whole lot easier to replace than a broken crankshaft or exploded flywheel.
 

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this sounds like a shear pin on the crack shaft the shear pin is under the fly wheel hope this will help you to bad you are so far away the cost for this is high if you take it to a repair show. I think the shop charge is around 80 bucks a hour
 

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:welcome: to SBF denny

There really isn't any discussion. As almost everyone else has said, we haven't seen an engine yet that didn't have a key holding the flywheel to the crankshaft. I'm sure there is an exception but with all the Tecumseh, Briggs, Honda and Honda clones they all have keyways. The engines have a keyway cut into the crankshaft and the flywheel and there is a key that locks them together and holds the timing. Doesn't matter if it's vertical or horizontal shaft.
Anything they may do for safety on a lawnmower engine just doesn't apply and there is no shear pin on any small engine I've ever worked on. The snowblower,yes. The engine, no.

 
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