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So, my question concerns my new-to-me Deutz Allis with an M18S. It's set up with a plow, I'll be using it in cold weather. My manual says to only use SAE 30 over 32 degrees F, and is says do NOT (yep, in capital letters) use 10w30. But then, under the little graph with the degrees and arrows, it says that 5w20 or 5w30 synthetic can be used up to 40 degrees. I'm fine with using synthetic, and I like the idea of up to 40. There are days when you're plowing way below freezing, but also still plowing on days when it's warmed up and above 32 degrees. But it just seems strange to me - to go from straight 30w to 5w20 - wouldn't it make sense to go from 30 to 10w30 synth? I'm new to using these Magnum engines in the winter - I've used Commands before, and with their hydraulic lifters, it was pretty easy - 10w30 synth, summer and winter. I love my Kohler manuals, but I've found some pretty glaring misprints (or just plain old mistakes) concerning things like spark plug gap, gasket application, and torque specs. So I normally listen to manuals, but I'm a little nervous about going from SAE 30 to 5w30, especially in an engine with solid lifters and 500 hours on it. What do you all think? I'd love to hear some opinions, thanks in advance!
 

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The Kohler Magnum will consume 10w30 oil at a higher temp, above 32f.
I use Amsoil 10w30/30 full synthetic oil made for small engines, its a special oil just for power equipment small engines.
I have been using it for years, and I use it year round, winter and summer without any problems at all.
Amsoil will flow at -46f, so you wont have any problem with it, and you wont have any problem with high temps either, or any excess oil consumption problems either.
Its the best oil available and well worth the extra money. Don't waste your money on any other oils that claim to be almost as good.
I've been using Amsoil products for over 30 years now and never had a problem.
The Magnum engines will consume regular 10w 30 oil quickly, that's why they tell you not to use it at warmer temps, but you wont have that problem with the Amsoil in hot weather.
10w 30 oils are made from 10 weight base with viscosity index improvers in them, it is too thin. The Amsoil is made from 30 weight base stocks with the paraffin's removed so it wont gell up and become too thick to flow at very low temps.
I hope this info will help you. I run my equipment at sub zero temps without any problems at all using the Amsoil 10w30/30 small engine oil, fast easy starts and immediate oil pressure when below zero F.
 

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Hi wildbill
I have an M20 on my Ariens GT20 that I use from May until December in Maine. I've always used 5W30 Quaker State conventional oil in her and she doesn't smoke or use oil between yearly changes. I would be nervous about 20W in any engine of mine, but it might just be the "old school" in me. MH
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the advice, guys. Still have to look into that Amsoil, I hear good stuff about it. In the meantime, off to wallyworld, think I'm gonna try the 5w30 Mobil 1. Thanks again!
 

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I just picked up 10 quarts of Valvoline Full Synthetic 5w40 at Autozone. It was on special for $2.00 a quart and I couldn't pass it up. Now I'm wondering what I'm going to use it in. Was thinking maybe my Ariens 8hp blower, or maybe the Cub Cadet 12hp Kohler. Would that be OK? It kind of sounds like everyone here is kind of all over the range on oils. Merry Christmas, by the way.
Duane
 

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Hello,
Due to this unseasonably warm December weather, I'm a little late (and slow) coming out of summer hibernation. Please bear with me. :)

OPE engine and equipment manufacturers are a little goofy when it comes to engine oil weights and recommendations. They get away with this because these motors are usually pretty tolerant of neglect ... infrequent oil changes, the "wrong" oil, etc ...

Generally, any 0W/5W/10W-30 will be fine. Good enough at cold start-up (especially if kept indoors) and fine at the temps these engines see in winter outdoor use. Just keep checking the oil and top-up as necessary.

As for 0W/5W/10W/15W-40, these oils will typically work fine but you may notice a bit more load on the engine. Not really a concern, but if you feel your engine is marginal for your blower, you might want to avoid them in favor of one of the 30 weight multi-vis oils.

Because they might not splash as well inside engines as a 30 weight (at operating temps), I don't consider them to be a top pick for winter duty unless your motor is a real oil burner. Not a bad idea to save them for summer duty in your mower.

A synthetic or synthetic blend will allow the engine to turn over more easily in the colder temps. That's about it. The high temp protection really isn't much of an issue in below freezing temps and with no spin-on oil filter, forget about extending your oil change intervals.

All major brands of oils come in a HDEO version ... Heavy Duty Engine Oil. These are gas/diesel oils with a robust additive package to deal with the byproducts of diesel fuel combustion over a long period of time. For OPE, I always choose an HDEO oil over regular oil ... just for the better add-pack.

So, what do I use? Yeti blood:

http://i229.photobucket.com/albums/ee149/BrorJace/Oil Analysis/Chevron_Delo_0W-30_large.jpg

However, this stuff is nigh on impossible to obtain. After 10 years of searching, I finally found some ... so, why not? :wavetowel2:

Now, if you'll excuse me, I am going to change into shorts and a T-shirt and go running. ;)
 

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Oil Identifiers

The "W" next to the first number(0W,5W,10W,15W)does NOT indicate "Weight" it indicates "Winter" which put's the oils on the cold side of the temperature chart for the coldest temperature the oil will still flow(cold scale). The second number indicates the actual "Weight" of the oil.
 

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SAE Viscosity Grade & Outdoor Temperature

Listed are guides to use for your reference no matter what oil you use.

20W-50 = -0 degrees to +100F.

15W-40 = -10F - +100F

10W-30 = -20F - +100F

5W-30 = -30F - +100F

0W-30 = -30F+ - +100F

Let me know if you have any further questions.
 

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David, the two measurements shown on a multi-vis oil are the two measuring points, correct? One at freezing point, the other at boiling?

As for your reference numbers, are those for conventional oils or synthetics? I would think the temperature range would swing 10-20 degrees depending on the base stock alone.
 

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You are correct. The two measuring points(5W-30) would be "minus -30" on the cold scale and "positive +100" Hot scale. These values reflect the standard scale that is used on each/every quart of oil so as not to cause confusion on the many types of grades/manufacturers to the consumer. The base stocks along with many other considerations would determine that operational value/swing and the OEM would make recommendations based on their requirements.
 
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