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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Cub Cadet Three Stage Snow Thrower - just noticed motor oil leaking from drain (closed) and more oil in left track. Not sure if I put too much oil in snow thrower (weeks ago during oil change) and now spilling out because of heat? Or is there something loose/ broken that is resulting in leaking.

Any help/ ideas/ tips would be really appreciated.
 

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it seems like the majority of the oil is below the drain which is tight (I checked/ tightened when I saw oil on ground).
Are you sure the drain tube going into the engine is tight?
There are flats on the drain tube that must be held with a wrench when removing the drain plug. I replaced the plug with an E-Z Oil Drain valve on my son's Troy-Bilt for this reason.
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Thanks for your reply, photos are below. For a little more context, it seems like the majority of the oil is below the drain which is tight (I checked/ tightened when I saw oil on ground). View attachment 195717
View attachment 195719
View attachment 195718
Looks like the drain plug is a small bolt that usually has a special washer. That washer is often a crush washer that is only perfect for one tightening. Replacement after each oil change is often recommended. On my Ariens the flats on the tube are not accessible to hold the pipe still but a vice grip works. The access is limited by the starter on my wheeled machine and the supports for the track drive on my RapidTrak.

Be careful with the tube threading into the engine block since it can crack the block if too tight (with pipe thread).
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you sure the drain tube going into the engine is tight?
So it doesn't look properly tightened. My last oil change I probably did forget to hold it in place when removing/ replacing the cap, so the grooves on the tube are ~20 degrees off center. Now, without the appropriately sized wrench available (only having an adjustable wrench and plyers) I'm not sure how to tighten the tube.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
There are flats on the drain tube that must be held with a wrench when removing the drain plug. I replaced the plug with an E-Z Oil Drain valve on my son's Troy-Bilt for this reason.
View attachment 195721
so the grooves are approximately 20 degrees off center, which makes me think the tube isn't tightened properly. Any advice on how to tighten the tube (with an adjustable wrench or plyers)?
 

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so the grooves are approximately 20 degrees off center, which makes me think the tube isn't tightened properly. Any advice on how to tighten the tube (with an adjustable wrench or plyers)?
As stated in an earlier post take caution when tightening the tube to prevent overtighening. Will the adjustable wrench fit into the grooves?
 

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A proper size wrench (SAE or Metric), a crescent wrench or a small pipe wrench will work to tighten that oil drain tube ... As mentioned, be careful not to overtighten or damage the threads on the block or the tube .... if you broke loose the factory seal against the block, you may want to remove it so you can apply another sealant on the threads.

As mentioned, you certainly want to hold any tube like that on any machine when removing the drain ca, which is usually a hex plug.
 

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As an aside/addendum... it's well worth investing in a decent set of basic tools, even if you only envision doing simple maintenance and repairs. As you're fast finding out, working with only a pliers and monkey wrench can compound problems, and in the worst case ruin parts and make further repairs even more difficult.

Harbor Freight/similar should have a capable basic set that won't break the budget, and will pay for itself many times over in saved time and lack of frustration. You can expand and improve on that as you require.

And welcome to SBF, glad to have you aboard.
 

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Yanmar Ronin is 100% correct. You NEED to invest in a decent set of hand tools if you are going to be doing your own work. An adjustable wrench is ok in a pinch when you can't carry a large tool set. I actually used to carry one in my backpack in school. (If I carried around a full set of combination wrenches, I would have got in trouble.)

If you are going to buy a set of tools, see if you can buy a decent set of name brand tools. Some Harbor Freight stuff is ok, sometimes they are not good. Check out garage sales, estate sales, etc. You can sometimes find Made in the USA vintage tools that will last forever.A proper set of wrenches from 1/4 to 7/8, a wide variety of screwdrivers, pliers, vise grips, sockets, rachets, extensions, etc. will be able to get you through most anything.
 

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