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Discussion Starter #1
I own a Toro 1028 LXE. I want to covert to led lighting. Change bulb or just add two fixtures, one on each handle. I have been told that it has a an 8 watt alternator. 12 volts, what amps? Showing my ignorance. Is that AC or DC. ( ok no jokes here). So can I just change bulb over? What is bulb # converted to automotive #?. Machine is not near me right now or I'd go look.

Thanks for any info.
Rob

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Discussion Starter #4

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If it's an 8W alternator, at 12V, that is 0.7A. Power = Volts * Amps. So Amps = Power / Volts.

An alternator would typically produce AC, not DC. And an incandescent light doesn't care whether it gets AC or DC, so there would be little reason for them to go through the extra step of converting AC to DC. If the alternator output was being used to charge a battery, that output *would* need to be DC. But output for a light is likely AC.

An LED does care whether it gets DC. The LED itself needs DC. Now, some lights might also handle converting AC to DC for you, it depends on what you're doing. If adding a complete light assembly, it might do that conversion. If just changing a bulb, then see what the manufacturer states for the bulb, for an acceptable input voltage range, and whether it can take AC.

At some point, if converting the light itself gets too-involved, you could also consider something like using an LED headlamp, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If it's an 8W alternator, at 12V, that is 0.7A. Power = Volts * Amps. So Amps = Power / Volts.

An alternator would typically produce AC, not DC. And an incandescent light doesn't care whether it gets AC or DC, so there would be little reason for them to go through the extra step of converting AC to DC. If the alternator output was being used to charge a battery, that output *would* need to be DC. But output for a light is likely AC.

An LED does care whether it gets DC. The LED itself needs DC. Now, some lights might also handle converting AC to DC for you, it depends on what you're doing. If adding a complete light assembly, it might do that conversion. If just changing a bulb, then see what the manufacturer states for the bulb, for an acceptable input voltage range, and whether it can take AC.

At some point, if converting the light itself gets too-involved, you could also consider something like using an LED headlamp, etc.
Thanks for that explanation. I think I know what i need to do

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