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I believe in parallel with the lights as the capacitor acts like a temporary battery, charging up from the supply from the rectifier and filling in any holes (ripples) in the supply with its own charge. Since capacitors pass AC and block DC, if you wired it in series, you'd get no power to your LEDs.

Edit: When using an electrolytic capacitor, make sure you match the polarity with the circuit. The negative bus has both the negative side of the capacitor and the negative side of the LED touching it. And the positive bus has the positive sides of the capacitor and LED touching it.
 

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I believe in parallel with the lights as the capacitor acts like a temporary battery, charging up from the supply from the rectifier and filling in any holes (ripples) in the supply with its own charge. Since capacitors pass AC and block DC, if you wired it in series, you'd get no power to your LEDs.
Sorry, that is incorrect.:wink2:
 

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Quote:Originally Posted by jrcjr View Post
I believe in parallel with the lights as the capacitor acts like a temporary battery, charging up from the supply from the rectifier and filling in any holes (ripples) in the supply with its own charge. Since capacitors pass AC and block DC, if you wired it in series, you'd get no power to your LEDs.
Sorry, that is incorrect.:wink2:
What part do you think isn't correct? A capacitor will let AC through in series but block DC like he said. Unless I've been wrong the last 45 years working as an electronics engineer.
 
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