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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hello,

I know it's the kind of a question that can have the answer depend on a multitude of variables (maintenance, engine hours, etc), but what is the average life expectancy on a Toro snowblower engine in years?

I recently bought a good condition 826 (1975-77 model, as per info I got here) and was wondering if I'm going to see much use out of it before it's due for an engine.

That being said, what are the signs of a "tired" engine? Mine seems to work OK, sounds good (no rattles, no shut offs, etc) and starts up right away, just doesn't seem to throw the snow very far (only a few feet distance). I was thinking of an impeller mod to make it throw a little further, but then I wondered if it's perhaps the engine that's tired after all these years...? Or perhaps it's the type of snow that's too light to throw far? (lately it was very cold and the snow was dry and light out here)

:confused:
 

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if its not throwing snow very far check and change the belts first. seeing that the 826 is your only blower and you don't know if the belts have been changed I would change them anyway and don't expect that every time you use your toro its going to blow snow 35- 40 feet even with good belts
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
if its not throwing snow very far check and change the belts first. seeing that the 826 is your only blower and you don't know if the belts have been changed I would change them anyway and don't expect that every time you use your toro its going to blow snow 35- 40 feet even with good belts
The guy who had it before told me he had put brand new belts on it last year and hasn't used them once. So they're essentially brand new. However, now that you mention it, I will see if they're adjusted properly (belt deflection). Perhaps I need to play a little bit with the adjusting screw on the auger engage lever... Thanks!

Going back to my initial question, what's the average life of an engine on a domestic use snowblower (that has had all the maintenance done)?
 

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The guys who forget to put the oil in usually last about 5 minutes.

The guys who never change the oil usually last 10 - 20 years.

The guys who treat theirs correctly don't know how long theirs will last yet.
 

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If after adjusting the belts and your 826 still does not throw very far you might want to measure or have your rpm's measured. Some of the guys here use a non-contact hand held tach to measure RPM's. Do you know what your motor is turning out at full throttle? Could be belts or could just be an easy adjustment to your engine or could be both.
 

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I highly doubt it is the engine. better cross check those belts. to see if they are the right ones. better tighten up the adjuster for the auger/impeller pulley. you can pm me if you don't know how to do that.
 

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Just to reiterate....

The engine will last a long long time if it is treated properly.

The real issue is that it will lose power over that long long time and still keep running. This power loss will not affect the throwing distance as the rpm's will remain the same. Many, many members here have repowered their blowers and reported that the difference in power was significant even when there was a slight reduction in rated horsepower.
 

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Like anything electrical\mechanical, it could last a day or a hundred years. Many people on the forum have snow blowers with engines that are close to fifty years old. If you change the oil at least once a season and keep the RPM's at or below the recommended max (usually 3600 rpm's) you could expect a long life expectancy. I gave my son-in-law a 7/26 Toro that was built in 1973 ( 42 years old) and it STILL runs great. :D
 

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Like anything electrical\mechanical, it could last a day or a hundred years. Many people on the forum have snow blowers with engines that are close to fifty years old. If you change the oil at least once a season and keep the RPM's at or below the recommended max (usually 3600 rpm's) you could expect a long life expectancy. I gave my son-in-law a 7/26 Toro that was built in 1973 ( 42 years old) and it STILL runs great. :D
I was built in 1971. now I feel old.:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Thanks again. I'm a little confused though as to what it means for an engine to lose power, but still throw the same distance. Isn't the throwing distance directly correlated to the engine's power output?

:confused:

As for keeping the rpm's at or below 3600, how do you do that? Play with the choke adjustment? My Toro has 3 throttle positions: stop, start and run. Not much room for play there. I usually put it on "run" once it starts and leave it there.

Just by the way it sounds, I don't think it's revving too high, just enough to blow snow. But I have no means of confirming rpm data. Installing a permanent rpm gauge would be nice, now that I think of it...
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Also, i think i might've asked the question in too vague of terms. The answers could literally be endless, based on different variables... my bad!

Perhaps the question should be: "What is the oldest bone stock snowblower engine you've ever ran into that was still running 100%?"

(100% as in not sputtering and essentially begging to be put out of its misery, lol)

:eek:
 

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Also, i think i might've asked the question in too vague of terms. The answers could literally be unlimited...

Perhaps the question should be: "What is the oldest bone stock snowblower engine you've ever ran into that was still running 100%?"

:eek:
I am NOT THAT OLD.:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D:D
 

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Hello,

I know it's the kind of a question that can have the answer depend on a multitude of variables (maintenance, engine hours, etc), but what is the average life expectancy on a Toro snowblower engine in years?
It's not a snowblower but back in 1967 my dad bought a new Toro lawnmower with a Tecumseh engine. The machine is now on it's third generation of use as I gave it to my son when he bought a home. Still going strong after 47 seasons.
 

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It's not a snowblower but back in 1967 my dad bought a new Toro lawnmower with a Tecumseh engine. The machine is now on it's third generation of use as I gave it to my son when he bought a home. Still going strong after 47 seasons.
Those Toro whirlwinds were great mowers. As a kid I cut grass for my neighbors, and used many of them all different years. My dad finally bought one for us in 74. Post up a pic!
 

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I was built in 1971. now I feel old.:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(:(
Todd, as long as your still running good, age does NOT matter. I'm a "49" model and so far, God willing, I'm still running pretty smooth with an occasional POP through the exhaust. :D :eek:
 
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