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Interesting website, list of all known gas stations that sell Ethanol-free gasoline in the US & the provences. Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada

Something else I've been thinking about. Ethanol can do a number on the metal parts of a fuel system. Nothing new there. But I was reading tthat it can also hurt rubber parts like fuel lines and gaskets.

This normally isn't a problem for new engines that have alcohol-resistant rubber parts; but what about the older products, those built before gas had Ethanol in it? Those parts may not have been designed for contact to Ethanol. Could the Ethanol be slowly destroying those parts? (Assuming that one did not use a stabilizer). Thoughts? ...Dennis
 

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Enigma--my guess is you are correct. I can tell you 100% for sure that Ethanol has damaged my 1976 Mercury Outboard motor for fishing and a 1990 Mercury Outboard on my boat. I have replaced the fuel lines several times because it eats through them, replaced gaskets and the list goes on. I use that Marine Stabil at each fill up now and it helps a lot (the picture the person posted prior to this post). Now my boat does not get used as much as a car though, so gas sits for at least 6-7 months in winter (especially this winter).

I found the same site you did a few weeks ago and found one station near Detroit that sells Ethanol free (sadly only one station). I am going to purchase some for my leaf blower which calls for 89+Octane. This particular station sells 90 Octane Ethanol Free.

I am debating using this same 90 Ethanol Free in my Honda HR 215 (from the early 90's) and my new Honda HS 724 Snowblower coming this fall. I don't mind a few extra dollars on good gas I am just not sure the higher Octane is good for these engines and need some investigating. Robert at Honda who posts on this site though I should be fine on my lawn mower and probably just wasting money though instead of 87.

At the moment, I am probably overkill with ethanol due to historic snowblower issues and boat issues. With my yard equipment, I Stabil (red stabil) usually 1 gallon of gas at a time and only keep it for about one month or so and then dump it in my car and buy fresh stuff. In the snow blower however, I don't always use it much so draining the gas back into can from the unit is a huge pain the butt.

There are some products I also found (True Fuel) available at Lowes which is 92 Octane Ethanol free gas; apparently at Ace as well. They sell it just fuel or mixed with oil at various rates. The bad part is the cost about $6-7 per quart (so about $28/gallon).

Sorry to go on and on but I hate Ethanol after all my issues. Apparently there was some legislation from Feinstein in Washington to get this stuff out of our gas but I am not sure how far it will will get. You can google it if you're interested from back in Dec or Jan.

Ethanol I know at least in Michigan for sure is a huge problem particularly with boats and all us guys that like to fish. Unfortunately, all us guys that like to fish and have 30 gallon boat tanks get the issues big time and its not exactly easy to drain 30 gallons of fuel. Therefore we just have fish more and use our boats more frequently I guess :)
 

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thanks enigma 2 for the website. closes places are Indiana and they are 45 miles for me. both towns have rural king farm stores there so it would be a trip worth while.
 

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(The nearest station to me on the Puregas list is a 100-mile round trip :( )

Plan B:


That is exactly what I use. Sometimes in conjunction with Starbrite's StarTron. I put it in the gas can before I fill it up. I know they sell those ethanol free gas cans, but at $10 a quart, it isn’t cost effective.
 

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enigma you are twice correct, ethanol is not friendly to rubber parts. cars and trucks that are e85 compatable have a steel gas tank and fuel lines
 

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The new fuel lines you get from an auto parts store should be ethanol hardened. In their description they say E85 approved. Changing out the fuel line should be a first thing right next to oil change when you pick up a used blower. Maybe adding a fuel shut off and fuel filter would be good too.
 

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In my 4 strokes I have been good with marine or the new Ethanol Small Engine Sta-Bil products as long as I drain them dry for the off season.

For my 2 strokes I bit the bullet and went to True Fuel. It's not cheap but the machines are so happy and that makes me happy!

I'm not aware of any local ethanol free fuels.

Pete
 

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Thanks for the link, Didn't know it was so readily available there has to be at least a dozen gas stations within ten miles of me and one that's only a couple of miles.
 

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Regretably, the only E-Free fuels in my area are being provided via 91 Octane which causes problems because of the high octane rating at this high of an altitude. The small engines such as in blowers and mowers run very poor with high octane.
What altitude, where :confused:

Makes it easier if you guys would go into "CP" and add a location.
 

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enigma you are twice correct, ethanol is not friendly to rubber parts. cars and trucks that are e85 compatable have a steel gas tank and fuel lines
Where are you getting this stuff ?? All cars have been using metal fuel lines but there is still some rubber and it's E85 tolerant in flex fuel and non-flex fuel cars. Flex fuel cars don't have anything different in their fuel lines than non-flex fuel. The fuel pumps are even the same. That and more and more cars are running plastic gas tanks for flex and non-flex alike. Metal doesn't hold up better and part of the horror stories about ethanol was that it did eat some of the coating on the inside of metal tanks back in the '80s before the technology caught up.

My daily driver is a slightly modified (bigger intake, turbo and exhaust) '95 Volvo turbo that I run 25% E85 each tank. In the three years I've been doing it I have yet to have anything but good things to say about it. No problems or failures in any fuel system component.

Having said that I go out of my way to get straight gasoline for the small engines as I do believe it's more stable and should I forget to drain something my fuel with Marine Sta-bil and a little Lucas FI cleaner should see it through to the next season.
 

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"Stabilizers" do not prevent/remove H20 from E10

Interesting website, list of all known gas stations that sell Ethanol-free gasoline in the US & the provences. Ethanol-free gas stations in the U.S. and Canada

Something else I've been thinking about. Ethanol can do a number on the metal parts of a fuel system. Nothing new there. But I was reading tthat it can also hurt rubber parts like fuel lines and gaskets.

This normally isn't a problem for new engines that have alcohol-resistant rubber parts; but what about the older products, those built before gas had Ethanol in it? Those parts may not have been designed for contact to Ethanol. Could the Ethanol be slowly destroying those parts? (Assuming that one did not use a stabilizer). Thoughts? ...Dennis
The #1 cause for E10 parts damage is phase-separated (P/S) fuel,
(due to water absorption), and "stabilizers" gas additives do nothing to prevent or remove water in a sedentary engine (storage).

Although pure-gas.org can be a useful resource it is a very unofficial list (website started by a layperson in 2009);
Stations posted by public (who likely did not even test gas to confirm it was actually ethanol-free) + no requirement to update stations...

In other words, if listing posted more than a few months old, very likely station no longer selling E0.
2012 + prior much easier to find E0 (without ethanol) - Now in 2014, over 95% of gas stations sell E10 (in all octane grades 87-93).

Call ahead and/or test gas at pump to ensure ethanol-free.

BTW - To check if gas in tank phase-separated (esp. after prolong storage) test alcohol percent (from bottom of tank if possible), if alcohol percent rose above 10%, likely P/S occurred.
Typically after phase-separation most ethanol drops with water to bottom of tank, and percent ranges from 60 to 95% alcohol.
Explains why running P/S gas with very high alcohol concentration can/will damage parts.
It's very rare that good fresh E10 (10% ethanol and without water) causes damage.
The (?millions) engines who had damage from E10 is solely b/c gas phase-separated or was illegally over-blended ABOVE 10%.

New or old engine, P/S gas is primary cause of problems (and parts damage) -
No gas additive can fix, reverse, correct or "make safe" phase-separated E10. (Discard gas, clean tank, and fill-up with fresh E10 gas, preferably E0 if you're still lucky enough to have that type sold in your area)...
 
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