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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
In the winter I typically get a ton of snow on my deck, and i have to have it cleared off for my small dogs or else they get lost in a snow drift. I'm looking for a good electric snow shovel, and this is the perfect time of the year to buy one used at a garage sale. Any advice on which is a good buy? Some have amperage ratings that hover around 7 amps, some as high as 10 amps. Should I assume that he higher the amp rating the more powerful it is? The Toro powershovels seem readily available, and seem to get ok reviews. The problem with these power shovel reviews is that many of them are written after a day of use, so no longevity usage is taken into account. Also, a lot of people using these are living in areas with very little snow fall, so the once or twice a year that they use these electric shovels is hardly taxing on the unit at all. I've watched videos of people using electric shovels, and I think that it would be perfect tool for clearing a deck. It would be great to have one hanging on a hook on my deck plugged in to an extension cord and ready to go at a moments notice.
 

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You should ask the seller how it's worked for them as that is YOUR snow in your area ;)
I have a small single stage gas for the deck for the same reason. Just wish it would go down the stairs too :D Never thought about an electric but for that use that's kind of a nice idea and I wouldn't have to keep 2 cycle gas in the winter. My trimmer and chainsaws need it in summer.

Usually the higher the amp rating the higher the power but not always as a poor performing motor can use more electricity. I don't know electric shovels, but if there is an "Energy Star" rated one it might have a higher performing motor that uses less energy but puts out more power. I'm guessing they are all pretty much equal as far as motors go and the higher amp is going to be higher power as the efficient motors require better magnets and more costly construction to achieve that efficiency. An electric snowblower just doesn't get used enough to make that investment reasonable.

Have you Googled any of the units you've been looking at like "Toro ????? reviews" and see what comes up ?? Different sites will have more reviews and more chances to see if you can get reviews from people with longer ownership. You could also check out consumer reports at the library for into on them too if you're not a subscriber.
 

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you can get btoro s120 on craiglist for 20-40 dollars, excellent machines, but honestly i would rather have the gas because there more powerful and you get to tinker with them
 

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I live in MA, I don't know how New England winters compare.

I have a Toro Powercurve 1800 electric single-stage for my deck. I'm very happy with it.

I bought my first one used in the summer for $25, used it for a season or two, then gave it to my parents.

One winter it seemed like we were getting 10-12" storms every week. I used it for what I'd consider deep snow multiple times. It did very well. You have to go rather slowly, of course, in deep/heavy snow. Electric motors typically make more torque as they slow down. I'd say it bogged less than my 2-stroke gas single-stage machines. Narrower cut than those, of course, but it would just kind of hunker down and keep throwing, rather than simply bogging like the gas ones (which were overwhelmed by much smaller storms than what the electric handled).

I missed it so much that I bought another used one, this one in the spring for $20 :) Used this several times this winter, including once after a few storms had built up. It was about 14" of snow, with a crusty icy layer in the middle. I went slowly, and the first pass would have snow coming over the top of the "bucket". So I'd back up, and clear the overflow. It never faltered, just slowed down, and kept chewing through the snow.

I don't mean their little PowerShovel, mind you. Mine is the older version of this:
Amazon.com: Toro 38381 18-Inch 15 Amp Electric 1800 Power Curve Snow Blower: Patio, Lawn & Garden

At about 25 lbs, it's easy to carry up the 10' of stairs to my deck. It does a great job, and my machines are probably 10 years old, at least. One had a belt that was starting to slip if I'd push it too hard into the snow, a replacement is about $15.

Highly recommended for deck duty, especially if stairs are involved. My 2-stroke single-stage machines were 60 lbs, very awkward to try and get up my stairs. I sold those, just have the Powercurve, and my big 2-stage. I hope this helps.
 

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I also have a 1800 powercurve for my second story deck. I have a dedicated extension cord (meaning it is not wrapped up, as we all know how hard it is to fight a coiled extension cord in cold weather) that I bring out in the fall with the 1800 and it lives on the deck during the snow season. It does do a good job on the deck, but it is to big for the steps. I'm thinking about a power shovel to replace the 1800. My deck is 12 x 18 and I find myself fighting the 1800 just trying to move around. (grille is the only thing that does not get stripped from the deck in fall).
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
Have you Googled any of the units you've been looking at like "Toro ????? reviews" and see what comes up ?? Different sites will have more reviews and more chances to see if you can get reviews from people with longer ownership. You could also check out consumer reports at the library for into on them too if you're not a subscriber.
I did google reviews for the units I'm looking at, but as I stated in the first post most of the reviews are after a day's use which gives no indication of how the unit handles long term usage. I trust the recommendations of this forum far above some review that may or may not be a planted review.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I live in MA, I don't know how New England winters compare.

I have a Toro Powercurve 1800 electric single-stage for my deck. I'm very happy with it.

I bought my first one used in the summer for $25, used it for a season or two, then gave it to my parents.

One winter it seemed like we were getting 10-12" storms every week. I used it for what I'd consider deep snow multiple times. It did very well. You have to go rather slowly, of course, in deep/heavy snow. Electric motors typically make more torque as they slow down. I'd say it bogged less than my 2-stroke gas single-stage machines. Narrower cut than those, of course, but it would just kind of hunker down and keep throwing, rather than simply bogging like the gas ones (which were overwhelmed by much smaller storms than what the electric handled).

I missed it so much that I bought another used one, this one in the spring for $20 :) Used this several times this winter, including once after a few storms had built up. It was about 14" of snow, with a crusty icy layer in the middle. I went slowly, and the first pass would have snow coming over the top of the "bucket". So I'd back up, and clear the overflow. It never faltered, just slowed down, and kept chewing through the snow.

I don't mean their little PowerShovel, mind you. Mine is the older version of this:
Amazon.com: Toro 38381 18-Inch 15 Amp Electric 1800 Power Curve Snow Blower: Patio, Lawn & Garden

At about 25 lbs, it's easy to carry up the 10' of stairs to my deck. It does a great job, and my machines are probably 10 years old, at least. One had a belt that was starting to slip if I'd push it too hard into the snow, a replacement is about $15.

Highly recommended for deck duty, especially if stairs are involved. My 2-stroke single-stage machines were 60 lbs, very awkward to try and get up my stairs. I sold those, just have the Powercurve, and my big 2-stage. I hope this helps.
I don't understand your reference to New England winters in your first sentence, but I do really appreciate the insight about electric motors being less likely to "bog down" I wasn't aware of that characteristic. I had looked at the electric powercurve, the advantage is that it can handle heavier snow fall and that the chute can be aimed appropriately, while a powershovel can not be aimed well in some situations.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
TORO makes electric leaf blowers that work for that deck thing of yours.:cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool::cool:
My father clears off his deck with a stihl blower and it works like a charm, but my situation is a little different. With my particular situation I can get a lot of drifting on my deck that comes off of my roof. So while only 3-4 inches may have fallen in the snow storm, I'll can have close to 10 inches on my deck. It does look like I may be talking myself out of the electric powershovel and into an electric snowblower. Heck, for the right price I may try out both options and see which I like best next winter.
 

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I don't understand your reference to New England winters in your first sentence,
I just meant that perhaps your storms are different than ours. I wanted to describe how I'm using mine.

Maybe you get 18" every time, meaning that the snow will be coming over the top of the intake/bucket every time you use it.

I was just trying to provide a bit of context for my experiences. If I was just using it in 1-2" storms, maybe that wouldn't be a useful comparison for you.

For use on the actual stairs themselves, the Powercurve would not be a good choice. But I shovel the stairs, then use the Toro to clear the deck itself.
 
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