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Discussion Starter #1
I pickid up a toro 521 with no spark. Found oil on the points. Then noticed the crank seal sitting crooked. I checked the crank for looseness and it moves like the crank or main bearing is worn. Is there a fix for this or is the engine junk?
 

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Since it was only a relatively weak 5hp Tecumseh I would re-power with 212cc Predator. Much more power than the 5hp engine. In fact the 212cc Predators make as much power as the 8hp flat head engines do or even more. You will be amazed at the amount of torque produced by the Predator 212cc. I replaced a 5hp engine on my MTD 5/22 and it throws snow over 40 feet. Here is a video of it in action. You will have a beast of a snow blower once you are done.



Mtd Yardmachine 5/22 repower with Harbor Freight ...


www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONdFik8kges

 

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Its absolutely possible but likely not cost effective (relative to repower) if you plan to have it done by a shop. I bet 200 in labor minimum.

If you decide to do it yourself, at a minimum I t will cost you seals and a gasket set. On the otherhand if you open it up and find a worn connecting rod, crankshaft, etc. then it starts to get expensive. I like doing restoration and have o.k. mechanical abilities so naturally this is the path that Id take. Depends on what you are comfortable to take on and willing to spend.
 

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An old flat head engine is not worth rebuilding. If it runs keep it but putting in $200 plus not cost effective for an old flat head versus new OHV.
 

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An old flat head engine is not worth rebuilding. If it runs keep it but putting in $200 plus no cost effective for an old flat head versus new OHV.
on THE BROTHERS OF DESTRUCTION. SR has the old school flat head on it. JR has a 1,000 dollar new old stock OHV 13HP BRIGGS INTEK on it. and that is all the more I am saying on this 1.
 

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... as far as motors go its not my call, I'm not buying it its totally up to the person making the purchase. I've never been a fan of flat head motors and ohv motors don't excite me either. Honda might make an ohc motor for a snowblower but the price would be more than the snowblower is worth
 

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on THE BROTHERS OF DESTRUCTION. SR has the old school flat head on it. JR has a 1,000 dollar new old stock OHV 13HP BRIGGS INTEK on it. and that is all the more I am saying on this 1.
I've got 2 Hondas and a Kohler 20Hp OHV. I hate them because I never have to repair them!!!! :D:D:D I actually did have to replace the crankshaft in a Honda...the Tree Root won that battle :) Magnificent machines.

Most of us are well aware of the virtues of OHV technology as well as the deficiencies of L-head engines.

Back to the original question, yes, the engine can be repaired.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
So, the bottom line is this: I bought this Toro 521 that came with a brand new coil for $80. A friend had previously looked at it and said it needed a coil. I thought it might be a issue with the points. The previous owner tore it down to the flywheel and gave up, so that's how I bought it - half apart. From a strictly money perspective, what's the best thing to do? Repower, fix old motor, or sell as-is? It sounds like fixing the old motor is not cost effective but I'm open to any ideas.
 

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Re-power is the most cost effective. If you need lights you could get a rechargable battery and 2 small bicycle LED Headlamps that would give you 3 to 4 hours of light per charge. Are you skilled at repairing small engines? If so go for it but I would try to do it on the cheap since even in pristine condition that old flat head isn’t worth too much. The downside is it may cost a ton of money especially if you bring it to a shop to have it repaired. Even if you do it yourself and it is only an engine crankshaft bushing and seal and you fix it cheaply it will still be a relatively anemic 5hp engine compared to a modern powerful OHV 6.5 hp engine
 

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So, the bottom line is this: I bought this Toro 521 that came with a brand new coil for $80. A friend had previously looked at it and said it needed a coil. I thought it might be a issue with the points. The previous owner tore it down to the flywheel and gave up, so that's how I bought it - half apart. From a strictly money perspective, what's the best thing to do? Repower, fix old motor, or sell as-is? It sounds like fixing the old motor is not cost effective but I'm open to any ideas.
What is the condition of the machine itself? If it's in decent shape, you still got an OK deal...Toro 521's are nice, compact snowblowers.

What are you (or your friend's) mechanical abilities? You won't know how much a rehab on the engine will cost until you break her open & look inside.
 

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i have two ohc gcv160s, one on an hrt216 and the other on an hrr216vka i bought new for 400. both run like champs and start on the first pull and never need anything more than basic maintenance. i also have my gx200 clone which is the exact same way, and used to have a gx140 on an an emglo compressor i sold. all ran great, were quiet, and fuel efficient. the gx140 was almost 30 years old when i sold it
 

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Okay guys. I have went through this thread and deleted all the flaming and irrelevant posts. Lets try to keep things on topic.

As for the actual question, the Predator engines can be had for under $100 with coupons and he can probably sell his old engine and parts for $20 - $30 as is. He could also try and put it back together and just see how it runs. It might not run great, but he could get a few more years out of it.

While working on things you might want to get some "00" grease and open up the front gearcase and clean it out and regrease it if you plan on keeping the machine for a while.

As for selling it to get your money back, those usually run for around $150 - $200 when running. Most people won't pay $80 for a non running machine regardless of what it is. That can be especially true if the engine is in a box of parts already.
 

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The real question at hand, with the engine together, if there is play with the crankshaft laterally, then the aluminum bosses are worn and probably warrant that you replace the block. This is probably more work and effort then most would want to tackle, and would require a donor block. I will defer to others with more knowledge on how much deflection, is acceptable, but I would be cautious at much if any.

Any repair and restoration, will require that you will need new seals and you will probably need to do a valve job if you are going this far. Considering this, you will have to balance the amount of money that you will be throwing into this engine, as compared to an out of the box HF engine. You, and only you will have to answer this, but understand that there is an awful lot of support here either way that you decide.
 

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you could get away with replacing the sump cover if the rest of the block is decent
That would be one half of the wiggle, but not the other half. And no guarantee to an actual fix.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
A few people mentioned crank bushings. What is involved with doing this? Is it a pound out the old bushing, press in the new type of thing or does it require a machine shop boring it out?
 
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