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Discussion Starter #1
It's gone - just clean gone into a snow bank in front of the neighbors house and now it's buried by the town plow.
I could tear apart the plastic and "hot wire" the thing but I'd prefer an easier work around for tonight.
No, I can't find the spare :mad:

Since it was made of plastic I'm thinking that it's presence prevents a dead short in the ignition circuit . . . ? Well, it makes sense to me at least.
Might a zip tie or some similar object might be a decent temporary patch?

Your thoughts on a temp replacement would be greatly appreciated.
Thanks
M.

last time I do anything nice for anyone pffft
 

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never had that problem, from my first powerlite to all the snowblowers i have now there is a string or chain tied to the key and attached to the handlebar so if the key does come out it will just dangle there
 

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Don't you hate it when something like that happens?:mad:

I believe you are right, though, you may get away with trying something made of plastic to get by, if you absolutely have to before you can get to one of the stores to pick up a new key:rolleyes:. Then, like detdrbuzzard suggested, fasten it to the machine somehow so it doesn't go missing, at least while it's being used.
 

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Lost keys

detdrbuzzard and bwdbrn1 gave you the straight info along with your original speculation.

The switch on most 2 stage is one of two types: either it has a metal key that's rotated or a plastic key is inserted into an opening. Regardless of which it is, when the key is off or removed the contacts are closed, effectively grounding the points or ignition. When it's turned on or the key is inserted, the 'ground' is broken allowing the engine to run.

I've replaced a couple of them with a heavy duty toggle switch (not for the contact ability but rather they're less likely to shake apart when the engine is running). Arrange it such the 'off' postion corresponds to 'run' and it works. Disadvantage is you can't just remove a key if you have kids around but the key can't fall out either.

In your case, sounds like all you need is something nonconductive that fits the slot that will break the circuit and you're in business.
 

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Thank you very much. I'll go there in the am. BTW, a 1/4" zip tie cut square works just as well. For when you're jammed up.
Marcintosh,
Thanks for the tip, the wire tie saved my day. My key is lost somewhere in the yard, driveway, or where ever it when, hahahaha.

I now have a whole bag of stock to make replacement keys!

Bernie
 

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any plastic will do, easiest, plastic utensil handles.
or just undo wire from key to junction point.
 

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I will say the back of a plastic spoon works well.
 

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if its such an easy thing to alter ( nowadays with the plastic) why do the companies even bother with them?:icon_scratch:
Could never figure that out? I guess originally with the metal key units was mostly to deter theft.
Since most units have a seperate kill switch anyway?:icon-shrug:
 

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mine is permanently keyed, the handle part of it broke off and the insert half is wedged in their good and tight flush w/the housing
 
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