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I just bought a fiber reinforced mudflap for a semi truck at a truckstop. I think it was like $12.......but I have had it since around the year 2000. I bought 2 and used them on various atv's over the years but kept them after I got out of the atv's.
 

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Most automotive tires these days are steel belted. As such, they're terrible for any kind of DIY project. But, many motorcycle tires are corded belts.

Every other year or so I'll need durable rubber pads for some project. A visit to the local motorcycle dealer and asking for a looksee at their discarded tire pile usually turns up some nice big rear wheel touring rig rubber. I always take along a neodymium magnet to insure the tire is corded lacking steel belts.
Are you sure you've seen tires with steel cords in the sidewalls? I've only seen steel belts under the tread. Tires I'm familiar with have nylon, rayon, or polyester cords in the sidewall. I guess your magnet wouldn't lie however.
 

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Yeah, I've never seen steel cords on the sidewalls either. And I have seen hundreds of tires cut up.
I'll be sure to put up a photo of an example I have in my pickup truck bed. I use a hole saw to install drainage holes in the sidewalls. Then, the tires act as grocery and hardware store caddies so stuff doesn't roll around in the bed of the truck when moving. Granted, this is a motorcycle street sport tire.

The hole saw operation had to breach steel cordage.

We don't really know it all, do we?
 

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2016 Ariens Deluxe 28 SHO
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Yamaha snow blowers line the impeller area with a plastic liner, making up the gap between the impeller and the housing, this would ensure that the housing remains as new. I would not do this over a housing that had scratches or open metal, sand and paint first.

CCMoe
 

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I'll be sure to put up a photo of an example I have in my pickup truck bed. I use a hole saw to install drainage holes in the sidewalls. Then, the tires act as grocery and hardware store caddies so stuff doesn't roll around in the bed of the truck when moving. Granted, this is a motorcycle street sport tire.

The hole saw operation had to breach steel cordage.

We don't really know it all, do we?
I'm guessing motorcycle tires are a different story. I've never seen a tire for sedans and pickup trucks with steel cord in the sidewalls. There could be special cases.
 
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