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Hi!

I'm about a week into ownership of a 1969 Ariens 10962 with 10995 snow-thro attachment. It was my grandfather's, and was in my cousin's possession for the past 12 years or so. I received it after the last snowfall this year, but I can't wait until next year!

Before reading on, please know that I have NO experience with any sort of maintenance -- engine or otherwise -- for anything like this. I can change a tire on my car, and that's about it. So bear with me, please.

1. I noticed that the left tire was almost flat, so I filled it with air -- and it looks like there's a leak from the valve stem. It seems that the tube I need is Ariens p/n 71050, which Jack's Small Engines has for $25. Is this what I should get, or would I be able to get a "generic" version of this tube for less money?

2. I know this is a silly question, but I've seen youtube videos where people flip their snowblowers upright to work on the bottom or tires, etc. But my scoop is teardrop-shaped, not flat, so I can't flip it upright, correct? How do people work on it?

I'm sure I'll have lots more newbie/naive questions... thanks in advance.

Doug
 

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Hi Doug

1. Likely just need to tighten or replace the valve if it's actually leaking from the valve itself. Is it actually a tube or is it tubeless?

2. You could use blocks for support to keep it from rolling back or ahead if you need to tip it up.
 
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Hi Doug,
welcome to the forum!

1. You should be able to find a cheap replacement tube..
write down the tire size from the side of the tire, then go to Tractor supply, (or maybe even Home Depot or Lowes) and you can probably find a tube for that size tire..
I bought a tube for my 1970's era dump cart at Tractor Supply last summer.

2.


Its resting on the chute..
angle the chute so that its facing forward, then tip the whole thing up..
its sitting "tripod style" on the two sides of the bucket, and the chute..
it does put some weight on the chute, but as long as the chute is properly attached, it can handle it..I have been doing this once a year for 7 years now, it works fine!

Drift cutters might work better, but most people dont have them..and would have to have double drift cutters, not just one..the way I do it is "normal" and common..

Scot
 

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Congratulations on your new "tank". :D

When you tip it, try to have as little gas as possible or drain it down before tipping it and if it's your first time put down cardboard so if the engine leaks any oil you have something to catch it on other than the garage floor or driveway. Once you've done it a couple times you'll know if you need to continue or not.

Wanted to point out the link in Ssotsman's signature. Great pictures, history and repair and restoration info for Ariens owners : The Ariens 1960's and 1970's Sno-Thro info site..
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Hi Doug

1. Likely just need to tighten or replace the valve if it's actually leaking from the valve itself. Is it actually a tube or is it tubeless?

2. You could use blocks for support to keep it from rolling back or ahead if you need to tip it up.

Thanks for the response, RAYAR. According to the Ariens manual, my model has tire and wheel assembly A12991, which includes a tire (71066), tube (71050) and rim (71052).

With the tire so deflated, I can actually stick my finger between the rim and tire and feel the tube. In fact, you can see it peaking out in this pic:



Here's a close-up pic of the valve stem; you can see that it's cracked (circled in red):



Maybe I used the wrong phrasing to describe the problem... but for this, I'd need to replace the tube, and not just the valve, right?

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Doug,
welcome to the forum!

1. You should be able to find a cheap replacement tube..
write down the tire size from the side of the tire, then go to Tractor supply, (or maybe even Home Depot or Lowes) and you can probably find a tube for that size tire..
I bought a tube for my 1970's era dump cart at Tractor Supply last summer.

2.


Its resting on the chute..
angle the chute so that its facing forward, then tip the whole thing up..
its sitting "tripod style" on the two sides of the bucket, and the chute..
it does put some weight on the chute, but as long as the chute is properly attached, it can handle it..I have been doing this once a year for 7 years now, it works fine!

Drift cutters might work better, but most people dont have them..and would have to have double drift cutters, not just one..the way I do it is "normal" and common..

Scot
Thanks, Scot! I'll try to find a cheaper tube. And then of course, I'll have to learn how to change it ;-)
I was planning on taking off the wheel, but do I need to do that or is it as simple as prying the tire over the wheel, removing old tube, inserting new tube, jimmying the tire back on, with the wheel still on the machine?

Doug
 

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90% likely you need a new tube.

To be sure, put a little air in it then smear the area of the crack with soapy water. If you see bubbles, you've found your leak.
 
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Well, it could just be a loose valve core and tightening it up might work. You need to pull the wheel off and put it in a bucket of water and see where it's bubbling. If it's from the end of the stem it could be as easy as tightening that core.

Looks like it's a 4.10 x 3.50 x 6"
 

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Congratulations on your new "tank". :D

When you tip it, try to have as little gas as possible or drain it down before tipping it and if it's your first time put down cardboard so if the engine leaks any oil you have something to catch it on other than the garage floor or driveway. Once you've done it a couple times you'll know if you need to continue or not.

Wanted to point out the link in Ssotsman's signature. Great pictures, history and repair and restoration info for Ariens owners : The Ariens 1960's and 1970's Sno-Thro info site..
Thanks for the tip, Kiss4aFrog.
I've spent many hours over the past week reviewing Scot's site -- it's been incredibly useful!
 

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90% likely you need a new tube.

To be sure, put a little air in it then smear the area of the crack with soapy water. If you see bubbles, you've found your leak.
Will do, thanks.

Well, it could just be a loose valve core and tightening it up might work. You need to pull the wheel off and put it in a bucket and see where it's bubbling. If it's from the stem it could be as easy as tightening that core.

Looks like it's a 4.10 x 3.50 x6"
Tire is marked 12.5 x 4.50 x 6.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
The tire is 12.5 x 4.5 - 6. Does that mean I get a tube the same size, or does a 3.5" tube fit in a 4.5" tire? Not sure how to explain the tire height of 12.5" vs tube listed as 4.1"....

That Pep Boys price was too good to be true -- not available in any store nationwide. I'll head over to Lowe's armed with my info (and tire) and see what I can find.

If I can't get anything there, I'll probably go to the shop that turned me away, with just the tire, and see what they have available.

Doug
 

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90% likely you need a new tube.

To be sure, put a little air in it then smear the area of the crack with soapy water. If you see bubbles, you've found your leak.
Well, it could just be a loose valve core and tightening it up might work. You need to pull the wheel off and put it in a bucket and see where it's bubbling. If it's from the stem it could be as easy as tightening that core.
I pulled the wheel off, and I don't even need to do a soapy water test... I can clearly see it's the crack in the valve (valve core isn't super tight either, but...). Quick 10 second video showing air escaping from the crack as I move the stem around:

 

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I'm not good on tubes. I'd call someone who sells lawn and garden tires and ask them what the correct tube would be for that size tire.
Or look up the part number for the tire that goes with that tube and if the tires is the same as yours then you know that tube would work.
 

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If you go to a store like Tractor Supply, Fleet Farm, even Lowe's or Home Depot sorts of places that carry outdoor power equipment, they should have inner tubes for small wheels and tires. The size of tire they fit is printed on the box they come in.

Once again, Donnyboy73 has come through with a DIY video! There are lots of hints here that you should find helpful.

 

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Lowes has a tube with a plastic valve stem for $11, and after watching Donnyboy73's video, I could likely do it, but I happened to call my local tire shop and they can get the tube with metal valve stem for $8 and he said he'd charge me just $10 to install for both tires. The local Ariens-authorized service shop will charge $15 per tire to install. I think I'll just make it easier on myself and have the tire shop do it.

The right tire seems to be holding air, but I figure for $8, I'll just put a new tube in. Check out both wheels:


Anything I should do to the right one before putting the tire on? Should I sand away the peeling paint and repaint? Suggestions?

The right hubcap also seems pretty rusted:



It's p/n 10288, which PartsRadar says was replaced by 00337700 (plastic hub cap) and 01238200 (spindle cap). They're super cheap, so I may buy them just to have them, but I hope I'll be able to clean up the existing hubcap, or salvage one from an old Ariens someone is discarding.
 

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At that price, you'd be saving yourself a lot of potential aggravation. These small tires and wheels can at times make even the most pious of persons swear like a drunken sailor. (No offense intended to anyone in the Navy, past and present.)
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I found a hubcap in excellent condition on ebay (any of you guys?) ... excited to swap out the rusted one for this new one:

 

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Well, I took the tires to my tire guy, who had previously told me he'd charge $8 for each tube, and only $10 to install them.

When he saw the tire, he said he didn't realize the type and would have to charge me 30 minutes of labor per tire to install the tubes. He said it wasn't worth it. I went to the local tractor shop and was told $25 per tube, $25 labor per tire.

So I decided to give it a go by myself. I ordered $10 tubes with bent metal valve stem from Amazon (here) and a set of 3 tire spoons for $18 (here). All came today, and in about 20 minutes, I had the new tube in. I definitely had to manhandle the tire both off, and back on, the rim, but it was fun to do myself.

Can't say I did the cleanest job... check out how I bent the rim in a few places :eek: - but seems to be OK.



After struggling so much with the one, I decided not to change both, since there was nothing wrong with the other tire. I'll keep the extra tube handy for the next change I need to make.
 
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