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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ordered my Mountaineering Edition 3 months ago. Was initially told it would be here in October, then November 5th, now I am being told January 5th. The dealer there is a good chance that will be delayed beyond that date. Told there is a shortage of: 1 - Engines, 2 - joystick control, and 3 - tracks. Wondering if anyone out there has gotten a Mountaineering Edition yet?
 

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Rather than waiting and not having a snow removal mule, why
not just buy a toro 1432 track drive unit? It has the identical transmission.
Yes, I have been a long-time user and owner of Toro products and found
them to be dependable and user friendly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Rather than waiting and not having a snow removal mule, why
not just buy a toro 1432 track drive unit? It has the identical transmission.
Yes, I have been a long-time user and owner of Toro products and found
them to be dependable and user friendly.
. For several reasons. First, Ariens has a much better track system. Secondly. My father in law was an engineer who worked for Toro, and he was instructed by Toro management to make sure that the parts he designed would only last for around 8 years. Sorry, but I want a snowblower to last a lot longer than that.
 

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Many toro snowblowers I come across are 30-40 years old and still holding up just fine, lifetime warranty plastics only thing that ever really goes wrong on toros are the impeller bearings, haven’t seen one with a catastrophic frame failure yet like gearbox or anything
 

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A toro snow blower will last as long or longer than an ariens as long as it is maintained and not abused.

A track drive system for any snow blower or snow thrower in the case of the German radio controlled Robocut machines that are track drive is dependent strictly on adhesion to create traction.

In order to create adequate adhesion you have to have weight and the weight has to provide enough total weight (ballast) over the square area of the tracks to allow the treads to grip in the case of a finish dozer or pushing smaller loads or in the case of a rough dozer with cletrac(deep) type treads it has to be able to grip and dig at the same time.

As I have described previously a modern 6 axle diesel locomotive will have 12 drive wheels and six electric motors to power them through a planetary gear arrangement with a sun gear on the wheel shaft and one planetary gear on the motor stub shaft.
Each driver/wheel has only the surface area of a dime contacting the ball of the rail so a 400-ton 6 axle locomotive has the square area of 2.519 centimeters.

All twelve wheels have a total of 30.228 centimeters or 4.685 square inches absorbing the 400-ton weight of a modern diesel locomotive. The weight on each drive wheel through the trucks holding the drive wheels and motors in place amounts to 85.38 tons per wheel or 170.75773 tons per wheel set.

All the tracked snow blowers right down to the Yamaha 624EJ model have more square area in contact with the ground surface than modern 400-ton diesel locomotive.

A snow blower of any brand is useless unless it has weight to create adhesion to clear snowpack.

A snow blower if operated to fast in deep snow pack that has been allowed to freeze and thaw slightly is more difficult to clear. It requires slower speeds to reduce the possibility of the front of the snow blower from rising and becoming useless. That is why toro added the weight kits to their snow blowers to keep the auger housing on the ground.

Toro and ariens use a sun gear design off the identical transmission stub shafts to power their track systems.
Toro has a track drive system with carrier rollers simular to earth movers/dozers.

The Ariens drive system uses only the sun gear and a single carrier roller to create tension for their track system these are the two drive design differences.

Any snow blower design created for the residential or small commercial snow removal market depends strictly on what the opportunity cost to manufacture them is plus the profit returned from each unit sold to a retailer who then sells them to the consumer.

Purchasing a snow blower is not a simple decision of what brand to buy.

I have used and owned toros for fifty plus years so I am partial to them because they are simple to maintain and 2 cycle single stage snow throwers. I have the Toro CCR 3000 GTS which is my fourth toro and my S620 snow pup which was my third toro snow pup.
I would still have all four of my toro snow pups hanging on the wall of my garage if the first two did not suffer a side frame failure due to heavy use.
Needless to say, I should have had them repaired and kept them in my stable of snow throwers.

You obviously need a snow blower for heavy use, you want to work at all hours, and you want it to last a long time.

I would suggest that you look at Paul Sikemas videos testing the toro trx and ariens track drive model and the comparison video examination he does between the trx and the ariens track drive units.
 

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Are the Toro's even available ? If not, back to square one with availability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
A toro snow blower will last as long or longer than an ariens as long as it is maintained and not abused.

A track drive system for any snow blower or snow thrower in the case of the German radio controlled Robocut machines that are track drive is dependent strictly on adhesion to create traction.

In order to create adequate adhesion you have to have weight and the weight has to provide enough total weight (ballast) over the square area of the tracks to allow the treads to grip in the case of a finish dozer or pushing smaller loads or in the case of a rough dozer with cletrac(deep) type treads it has to be able to grip and dig at the same time.

As I have described previously a modern 6 axle diesel locomotive will have 12 drive wheels and six electric motors to power them through a planetary gear arrangement with a sun gear on the wheel shaft and one planetary gear on the motor stub shaft.
Each driver/wheel has only the surface area of a dime contacting the ball of the rail so a 400-ton 6 axle locomotive has the square area of 2.519 centimeters.

All twelve wheels have a total of 30.228 centimeters or 4.685 square inches absorbing the 400-ton weight of a modern diesel locomotive. The weight on each drive wheel through the trucks holding the drive wheels and motors in place amounts to 85.38 tons per wheel or 170.75773 tons per wheel set.

All the tracked snow blowers right down to the Yamaha 624EJ model have more square area in contact with the ground surface than modern 400-ton diesel locomotive.

A snow blower of any brand is useless unless it has weight to create adhesion to clear snowpack.

A snow blower if operated to fast in deep snow pack that has been allowed to freeze and thaw slightly is more difficult to clear. It requires slower speeds to reduce the possibility of the front of the snow blower from rising and becoming useless. That is why toro added the weight kits to their snow blowers to keep the auger housing on the ground.

Toro and ariens use a sun gear design off the identical transmission stub shafts to power their track systems.
Toro has a track drive system with carrier rollers simular to earth movers/dozers.

The Ariens drive system uses only the sun gear and a single carrier roller to create tension for their track system these are the two drive design differences.

Any snow blower design created for the residential or small commercial snow removal market depends strictly on what the opportunity cost to manufacture them is plus the profit returned from each unit sold to a retailer who then sells them to the consumer.





Purchasing a snow blower is not a simple decision of what brand to buy.

I have used and owned toros for fifty plus years so I am partial to them because they are simple to maintain and 2 cycle single stage snow throwers. I have the Toro CCR 3000 GTS which is my fourth toro and my S620 snow pup which was my third toro snow pup.
I would still have all four of my toro snow pups hanging on the wall of my garage if the first two did not suffer a side frame failure due to heavy use.
Needless to say, I should have had them repaired and kept them in my stable of snow throwers.

You obviously need a snow blower for heavy use, you want to work at all hours, and you want it to last a long time.

I would suggest that you look at Paul Sikemas videos testing the toro trx and ariens track drive model and the comparison video examination he does between the trx and the ariens track drive units.
I did watch the video, and that is what steered me towards the ariens. It is faster in the drive mode, and turns easier than the toro. I too have had many toro products, and I have put way more work into them to keep them going than I ever had to do with my John Deere. Just helped a neighbor tune up his his toro going for winter, and was not impressed with how much plastic they use on their machines. Glad you are partial to toro, but I am not. Still going to hold out for the Ariens.
 
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