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Discussion Starter · #21 ·

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
@Ziggy65

Very happy you found another 10000 series in good condition (1972 ?) for parts, although it may be the better machine to build from?
I was under the impression that it is a 1971, but whatever. It could be rebuilt but I prefer the 1973 (being able to control the drive clutch directly from the right side handle bar, clutch lever over left handle instead of under, etc.).

It's a shame someone ran machine into the ground, replacing the axle bushings would have prevented a lot of grief.
We're on the same page! :)

Great detailed photos, you are doing it right, not cutting corners.

I look forward to following your resto mod project, it should be a beast when you are done.
Thanks for the support! Much appreciated! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
For the restauration/rebuild of my 910021, I have decided to illustrate certain steps in case these could be useful to other newbies such as me.

At a local bearing vendor, I purchased the following bearings and bushings.



As shown above:

The Ariens thrust bearing 54074 for the friction disc is a Timken T126.

The 2 drive plate ball bearings and the impeller bearing are Ariens 54063 (Height: 1/2", ID 3/4", OD 1-3/4"). Sealed 1635 2RS bearings are of that size.

On each end of the friction disc shaft are Ariens bearings 54080 (Height: 7/16", ID: 1/2", OD: 1-3/8"). Sealed 1621 2RS bearings are of that size.

The two 55030 Ariens axle flange bushings on my 910021 have a height of 7/16", an ID of 1/2"and an OD of 1-3/8"

The shown four Ariens auger bushings 55035 have a 1-inch inner diameter, a 1-1/4"OD and a width of 5/8". Two will go on the end of the auger shaft, and if needed, two will go in the middle onto the drive gear box.

Removal and re-installation of the drive train:



  1. Remove the mechanical hair pin from the top shaft and pull this shaft to the left in order to free the top portion of the friction disc sliding fork.
  2. Remove the cotter pin from the top finger of the shift mechanism transfer lever.
  3. Remove the shown 3 side bolts and then remove the shift mechanism from the tractor.
  4. If the whole drive train assembly is to be removed, pull out the large hair cotter pin from the bottom shaft of the disc bracket assembly.
  5. Remove the master link from the chain and then pull it out from the assembly.
  6. Remove the 2 small hair cotter pins from each side of the assembly in order to release the 2 small brackets (arms) that prevent the disc bracket assembly from swinging towards you.
The whole disc bracket assembly can now swing out as shown below.



Hold the hex shaft with a Westcott wrench and unscrew the nuts at each end of the shaft.

The small sprocket on the left can be removed as shown below. However a small woodruff key also needs to be removed from the shaft in order to permit the bearing on the left side to be removed.



Unfasten the 4 nuts on the left bearing carrier. This will permit you to pull the shaft to the left permitting the removal of the friction disc assembly.

Note: I also removed the right side bearing carrier because I wanted to replace the bearings on both ends of the hex shaft.

The thrust bearing inside the sliding fork is attached to the friction disc by a large circlip. Removal of this circlip was done with a circlip plier.



After separating both parts, it was possible to slide the Timken T126 thrust bearing out of the fork and replace it with a freshly greased new one.





As shown above, the new T126 bearing was packed with Bel Ray waterproof grease and inserted into the arm. After placing the sliding fork over the friction disc attachment as shown above, it was time to replace the circlip. See the inserted circlip below.



The whole friction disc assembly (except for the 2 end nuts) is shown below along with the two new 1621 2RS bearings.



Re-assembly was done and the hex shaft received a small amount of lithium grease.



Note: The inside portion of bottom pipe was cleaned from rust and lubricated with copper anti-seize. It, and the shaft that enters it, was quite rusty and a bit tough to separate.

In previous steps, after having removed the above disc bracket assembly, on the largest chain sprocket on the left side, it was evident that the gear teeth on the pinion and its bushing were damaged.

Removal of the 2 small exterior bolts holding the support bracket to the left side of the tractor and also the longer bolt holding the bushing and sprocket in place permitted the removal of that pinion/sprocket assembly.



Damaged pinion teeth and bushing from 910021.



The following from the 910002, along with its chain, are in better shape and will therefore be transplanted into the 910021.





Note: The above chain and its master clip have been soaked in kerosene for 24 hours.

Re-installation of all parts into the tractor has been done in reverse order of the removal explained above.



Note: The chain has been generously lubricated with Dupont Teflon Chain-Saver Dry, Self Cleaning Lubricant.
 

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Excellent.
The step by step instructions and detailed photos will be of great use to many Ariens 10000 series owners , as well as the bearing and bushing info.

You do top notch work, thanks for taking the time to document and photograph your project.

What condition were the original bearings in?
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 · (Edited)
Excellent.
The step by step instructions and detailed photos will be of great use to many Ariens 10000 series owners , as well as the bearing and bushing info.

You do top notch work, thanks for taking the time to document and photograph your project.
Thanks for the kudos @Ziggy65 I was inspired by you and many others on this forum.

What condition were the original bearings in?
I looked at them but didn't examine them very closely because I figured that after 48 years, it was time to change them. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
The drive plate assembly from the 910002 must be dismantled to be able to retrieve the desired jaw claw coupling.

The drive plate assembly was tightly clamped into the rubber protectors of my vice. A 2-foot pipe wrench then made it possible to unscrew the jaw coupling from the assembly.

Note: These are left hand threads! We therefore need to turn clockwise to unscrew the coupling. The pic shows the wrench in a vertical position but it had started out in a horizontal position. I simply pushed down on it. On the previous original one from the 910021, I had to lightly tap on the end of the wrench handle with a large hammer. It came off without too much difficulty.





After having freed the jaw coupling from the assembly, I now needed to separate the bearing holder from the drive plate. I held the bearing holder in my hand and gave a few hard taps on the end of the shaft with the shown dead blow hammer.



The parts separated as planned (without hurting the threads on the shaft.



The shaft now needs to be separated from the drive plate in order to permit changing the bearing near the plate.

The drive plate was clamped tightly into the vice as shown below.



The 2-foot pipe wrench was used to remove the shaft (in the same fashion as had been done for the jaw coupling above).



Note: In the above, I didn’t worry about damaging the shaft with the pipe wrench because that portion of the shaft does not touch anything.

The bearing at the bottom of the carrier as show below is left to be removed.



The carrier was clamped into the vice and a large ratchet socket and extension was inserted facing the bearing to be removed.



A few taps on the socket extension with a ball peen hammer and the bearing fell out from the bottom of the holder.

As shown below, the drive plate jaw claw coupling from the 910002 can now be used in combination with new bearings and the other shown items from the 910021.

 

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Valuable information and great job detailing the step by step instructions of the process.

That is one serious vice!

I look forward to following your rebuild of this fine old machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
One Step Forward, Two Steps Back

In a previous post, I had mentioned that the bearing holder part for the drive plate assembly and pulley had been damaged. Further inspection of the tractor revealed cracks in the front which were certainly caused by the loose/broken bearing holder. These cracks need to welded.

This is the front view of the crack (behind the pulley).



All of inside mechanism therefore needs to be removed again.



The drive mechanism was removed as explained previously.

To free the rear clutch lever mechanism, the spring was disconnected and then the top fork shaft was pulled out towards the left.



To release the shaft from inside the front clutch lever pipe, the outside cap on the left side of the tractor was removed before tapping on the inside shaft with a long punch to move it out towards the right hand side.



Note: That inside shaft quickly jammed because of rust, etc. It took lots of PB Blaster, etc. to gradually be able to extract the shaft from the front clutch lever pipe.

Note: These end caps are a bear to remove. Mine are now mangled and will need to be replaced.



The crack was high-lighted inside the tractor for the welder.



The top of the tractor had also been “mangled” by the previous owner (grinder marks, extra stud hole, etc.).

I asked the welder to plug the extra hole and weld another spot shut.



Since I intend on using a 208cc OHV engine, the left tractor support arm for the chute rod was notched and then bent in order to clear the future OHV engine valve cover, side, etc.



The bottom front right hand side corner of the tractor also needed a weld. This is where the tractor is connected to the Sno Thro.



All welds have been completed on the tractor.

Inside view:



Outside view: Front crack plus the chute rod bracket.



Bottom front right hand corner :



The tractor is now ready for paint preparation.
 

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Nice weld repairs and modification to the chute rod bracket.

Appreciate the detailed photos, they are worth a thousand words:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Handlebars

The beige paint over the chrome was quite damaged.



I used paint stripper to remove the paint and see the condition of the chrome.





This was an easy decision to make. The rust was cleaned up with a heavy duty twist knot wire wheel on my grinder. This removed the rust but revealed pin holes and other flaws.

The bars were sanded with 80, 120, 220 and then 320 grit paper. Paint thinner was used to clean the dust, etc. The bars were now clean but there were pin holes, scratches and other flaws to deal with.



I applied glazing spot putty to the pin holes, etc. and then let it dry for a few hours.

The putty was sanded with 120, 220 and then 320.

The bars were cleaned again with paint thinner.

Note: The products that were used (along with the glazing putty) were:



Duplicolor Self Etching Primer
Krylon 469039 White Primer
Krylon 42706 Gloss Dover White
Krylon 42705 Gloss Clear

2 light coats of self-etching primer were applied (20 minutes drying between each coat).



2 coats of white primer were applied (left it flash 10 to 15 minutes between each coat).

More glazing spot putty was applied to remaining pin holes, scratches and other flaws… and then let it dry for 24 hours.



Lightly sand the bars before applying white primer to the above glazed spots.

After 2 more light coats of white, 2 light coats of clear were applied (15 to 20 minutes between each coat).



The bars were set aside to cure for a minimum of 2 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #35 ·
1971 Sno-Thro

I decided to use the 1971 Sno Thro attachment because it is in better shape than the 1973 one.



However I wish to replace the 1971 impeller with the 1973 one. To remove the rakes, gearbox and impeller from the 1973 Sno Thro:
  • The pulley was removed from the back of the bucket.
  • The left and right outside bushing carriers were removed.
  • The whole impeller/auger assembly was pulled out of the Sno-Thro.


  • The rakes were then removed from the axle.
To release the impeller from the shaft, 2 roll pins needed to be tapped out.



Once the roll pins were removed, the impeller, etc. were placed in the vice.



After soaking it with PB Blaster for 24 hours, I tried tapping on the impeller central part to release it from the shaft … but no dice. It did not budge!

I decided to use my old hydraulic press to release the impeller from the helicon pinion shaft.

However the 24-inch rake shaft prevented me from dropping the gearbox through the small open space that is between the 2 horizontal beams of the press apron.



The rake shaft must therefore be separated from the gearbox. To do so:
  • The side cover was removed from the gearbox.
  • The roll pin holding the rake shaft to the gearbox gear was tapped out through front gearbox hole.

  • I cleaned the burrs, etc. off the shaft and then slid it out of the gearbox.
  • The gear was removed from inside the gearbox. It just flips out from behind the gear on the impeller shaft.
I could now slide the gearbox down through the middle empty space of the press apron. This made it possible to press the helicon pinion shaft out of the impeller.

Note: Care had to be taken to support the middle portion of the impeller while pressing down on the shaft. Otherwise the impeller paddles could certainly be bent out of shape.

I clamped 2 small pieces of steel together on each side of the helicon pinion shaft in order to put pressure only on the middle “round pipe” portion of the impeller.



Thus the impeller and the gearbox were easily separated from each other.



Note: The 1971 impeller was also separated from its gearbox assembly in the same way as had been done above for the 1973 impeller.
 

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Great details and photos to illustrate the process.

Question though, why do you prefer to use the 1973 impeller over the 1971 version?

I have found the impeller to housing gap smaller with the older style impeller compared to the newer style. Both designs are very heavy duty and well built.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
Great details and photos to illustrate the process.
Thank you!

Question though, why do you prefer to use the 1973 impeller over the 1971 version?
To my newbie eyes, it "seems" to be an improved reinforced version.

I have found the impeller to housing gap smaller with the older style impeller compared to the newer style. Both designs are very heavy duty and well built.
I will need to compare the impeller to housing gap sizes. Thanks for the heads up! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
1973 Tractor Paint, etc.
Paint, etc. used:



Krylon 469040 Red Oxide Primer
Dupli-Color Chevrolet Orange DE1620
Dupli-Color Clear CDE1636

Every rusted area was cleaned up with a flap wheel sanding disc on my grinder. Grinder gouged areas on the top, etc. were filled with glazing spot putty and left to dry for a few hours.

The putty was then sanded with 320 grit sandpaper before preparing the whole tractor with 400 grit.

Note: Paint thinner was used to clean the dust, etc.

Painting the inside portion of the tractor:







Painting the outside portion of the tractor:





A few light coats of red oxide primer with 7 minutes between each coat:



Followed by 3 light coats of orange and then 1 light coat of clear (10 minutes between each coat):





This Dupli-Color Engine Clear tends to drip after only 1 light coat over a few coats of engine paint. Since I prefer to apply a minimum of 3 clear coats to protect any spray can paint that I do, I will let this paint cure for a few weeks or more. I will then lightly wet sand it with 1500 grid sandpaper and try to apply 2 or 3 more coats of clear.
 

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Great attention to detail.

Has to be one of the most thorough and detailed restorations I have seen. It's going to be a real show stopper when you are finished.

I have never applied clear coat, but I imagine it results in a beautiful finish. The key to getting good results with painting is following the manufacturers directions and applying light coats and having patience. Good call on letting the paint cure for a few weeks.

Can't wait to see the finished machine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
Great attention to detail.

Has to be one of the most thorough and detailed restorations I have seen. It's going to be a real show stopper when you are finished.

I have never applied clear coat, but I imagine it results in a beautiful finish. The key to getting good results with painting is following the manufacturers directions and applying light coats and having patience. Good call on letting the paint cure for a few weeks.

Can't wait to see the finished machine.
Applying clear "usually" results in a brighter finish. The main goal is to protect the paint. If your unit is scratched, you only need to repair the clear coat.
Note: This engine clear has to be the most finicky clear coat that I have ever dealt with. If you sneeze ... it will drip LOL!
 
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