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Okay guys, so back in August I purchased a used Ariens 926038. It was originally purchased in October of 2015. I was told that there might be 5-6 hours on it. I actually came apon it by looking for a lawn mower to maintain my aunts/God mother's property who passed back in early July. When I saw it, I said that I had to go at least look at it. It is a very nice machine, but with a little bit of wear to the inside of the chute and impeller areas because she was used on a stone driveway. (All which has since been taken care of.) The seller was moving down to Naples, Florida so he wanted to sell it. Bottom line is... I bought it. I did all of the maintanance since. I finally filled her with fuel yesterday and brought her over to my garage. My next door neighbor was kind enough to let me work on her in his garage because he has the space. I know that I am going to be in for a new adventure using a new machine for this snow season after using our 1971 Ariens for the last how many years? (34)?

I did realign the skid shoes by the way of the Ariens Auto Turn adjustment video where it dropped the scraper bar by almost 1".

After I filled her up with fuel yesterday and I was bringing her over to my garage, I have to be very honest... I did not care for the way she felt going along the driveway. It really felt like she was dragging and being sort of held back sliding along the black top with a fair amount of restriction... almost like the weight of the bucket or machine is too heavy in the front. I also did notice markings on the driveway from the skid shoes. Right away I could see how a lot of you bring up the talk of different skid shoes. I didn't however, really feel any weirdness with the auto turn other than it being new to me.

So I might have to look in to some kind of remedy. I did see a video on Youtube from 007Connecticut on how he developed a roller type designed skid shoe where I thought this could possibly be a good resolve.

I will be curious to see what you guys have to say.
 

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I hear the Poly shoes help. I have a set in the garage that I’ll probably install this weekend.
That being said, the performance of the stock steel shoes on dry concrete/asphalt probably is not representative of what you will see on snow. I’d use the blower a couple of times in real snow before getting concerned.


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A snowblower was never intended to bear the full weight of the machine going across dry pavement or a lawn that is not frozen.


If you are moving a machine across dry pavement or a lawn that is not frozen, you have to tilt the unit back while it is moving, thus keeping the skids and cutting/scraper bar off the surface.
 
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