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Discussion Starter · #21 · (Edited)
in for a penny, in for a pound! continued working on the blower. removed the white cover plates for eventual repainting. after removing the top bolts, the top of the cylinder was loose, so in i went. the gasket looked OK, though should just be replaced. cleaned up old oil crud. i remember reading ariens suggested regular scraping/cleaning of this area (de-leading/de-carboning?). i noticed a thin black layer. what should i use to remove it? also, is the gasket available in stores like napa? and anyone know the torque specs for the top engine bolts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Briggs and Stratton carbon deposit cleaning:

According to the B&S website:

"Clean combustion chamber deposits every 100-300 hours."

Using unleaded gasoline reduces carbon deposits, but you should still remove the cylinder once each 100 hours of operation and scrape off the carbon, using the tools and solvents described in this section. Clean the cylinder more frequently if you use your engine heavily.
This is in their "maintenance" section.

Place the piston at the top dead center so that the valves are closed. Then, scrape carbon gently from the cylinder head, using a wooden or plastic scraper. Take care not to dig the scraper into the aluminum. On stubborn deposits, use a putty knife, wire brush or steel wool (images A, B, and C), taking care not to bear down on the metal surfaces.

Clean away the remaining carbon with solvent, using fine steel wool to smooth rough spots. You can also soak metal parts for up to 15 minutes to remove stubborn deposits. Scrape again, if necessary, to loosen stubborn grit. Then, clean the area thoroughly with the solvent and set the head aside.
With the piston still at the top of the cylinder and the valves closed, use the same method to remove carbon deposits from the piston and the end of the cylinder (image C).


Turn the crankshaft to open each valve, and carefully remove any visible carbon deposits on the valves and valve seats (image D), using only a brass wire brush. CAUTION: Do not allow grit to fall into the valve chambers or between the piston and the cylinder wall (image E).

Inspect the valves and valve seats to see if they are cracked, rough or warped. Bring damaged parts to an authorized service dealer for inspection before reassembling the head.

Using a scraper, solvent or both, remove any remaining carbon and residue left behind by the head gasket on the cylinder head and engine block. Clean the surfaces thoroughly before installing the new head gasket. Any debris or oil left on the cylinder head or engine block may prevent a tight seal and cause eventual engine damage.
 

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did you check the valve lash since your in there that far? might even be worth lapping the valves since your that far in there.
 

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well, after a couple of days of solid work, here is how it looks. opened the belly pan, things looked pretty good. everything looks freshly greased. gave all the orange a good cleaning. then separated the attachment and cleaned it and removed the worn scraper bar. over time the bucket edge has been impacted by some wear. typical separation on the corners.

swapped in some nicer handlebars. needs a new belt badly (anyone know the part number?).

next i have to see about the augers, ratchet wheels, and fuel system.overall i'd give the body and transmission an A-.
I see the friction disk assembly is on a splined shaft on that first gen instead of a hex shaft like all the 10k series models. They kept changing things that first decade and into the second decade. Even the last two years of production of the 10k series, they changed their impeller and all those other safety upgrades they made, the gearbox itself changed. They were continually evolving. By 73 they finally had all the major designs in place standard, the augers and impeller on the 73 ran all the way into the early 2000's. Is this the machine with the frozen augers? I thought you said it was on a 1965 10k series. Thats a 1964 first gen unit, even if its a "hybrid" its all first gen designs and parts their, now wonder you don't have grease fittings, I never touched a first gen before. They probably realized grease fittings were a good idea in 1965 on the 10k series when it came out, along with the grease fitting on the differential end of the axle, since thats the year the locking hub was put on starting with the 10K. If a 1965 first year 10K doesn't have grease fittings on the augers, I'd like to know what year they put them on. But were looking as a 64 first series here, so if they didn't have grease fittings on them yet, I wouldn't have known, I never saw a first gen in person or one that had the optional side pieces on the bucket. The earliest ones I've messed with were all one piece bucket 10k series units. I know 1969 was the last year of the older style augers with the V's on them, 1970 they started using the newer style with the little kickers that flared out on the inner ends of the augers. From what others have said, the first gen was still pretty primitive, with that one lever system and lack of grease fittings, the round muffler that stuck out with a pipe, etc. They were still experimenting as seen with those ratcheting hubs. Their cool, and unique, definitely still in the early stages of designs. So that would have taken the Gard n Yard attachments than. The 10k series had the trac team line of attachments. Interesting stuff. I saw a 1960 first year machine for sale in PA mint a few years back for $100 bucks. It was gone the next day. It would be really cool to get one of those.
I have the Operators and parts manuals for every machine from 1961 to 1974. In the future if you have questions about if something is their or not such as grease fittings, give me the year and model machine and I will pull out its parts manual and we can see whats what.
 
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
ziggy,

this is your earlier statement:

"Engine should have been built October 16, 1964 (4290) based on attached information. Some time later the engine would have been installed by Ariens on the machine. IMHO this is a 1965 model, as per Ariens 10000 series manual. Whether a 64 or 65, it doesn't really matter."
 

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Yes that is my earlier statement.

The engine was definitely made in October 1964. Based on the tractor serial #, according to the Ariens manual it is a 1965 model, but it has been known to possibly have inaccuracies.
Your machine has many 1st generation parts and features.
It is possible the original engine was replaced at some point.

In the grand scheme of things does it really matter if it is a 1963, 1964 or 1965?
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Yes that is my earlier statement.

The engine was definitely made in October 1964. Based on the tractor serial #, according to the Ariens manual it is a 1965 model, but it has been known to possibly have inaccuracies.
Your machine has many 1st generation parts and features.
It is possible the original engine was replaced at some point.

In the grand scheme of things does it really matter if it is a 1963, 1964 or 1965?
yes, it doesn't matter to me. i was just going on your suggestion that this could be an early 10k series, based on the engine info. in the end, its a snowblower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
a few fuel tank questions:

1) what kind of metal is it made of? mine seems to be in excellent condition inside. wondering is if is something other than steel.

2) the tank shut-off: anything to rebuild (o-rings, etc)?

3) my cap is two pieces. anything possibly missing?
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
also, like to get replacement tecumseh stickers for the flywheel cover. anyone have pics of what it should be, and sources for reproductions?
 

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Not sure if you are going for period correct (mid 60's), but that Tecumseh label is on an engine from the mid 70's to 80's.

60's Ariens labels:


1966
178005


1964
178006


Early 60's

178007
 
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Discussion Starter · #38 · (Edited)
you're right, that decal is from a seventies. i would like to stay somewhat period correct, but don't mind straying a little outside the lines.
 

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Pristine, quite remarkable for the age.

My 1969 tank is good but not that nice.
 
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