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Discussion Starter #1
So I picked up a 924073 1032 for $150 and started going thru it. I started on the blower first. New auger bushings, fan bearing, belts, scraper bar, and Chev engine enamel. Did the air gap mod, and she blows like a mother!

I can not for the life of me get the augers to free up. I heated them as close to the gear box as I dared. They wouldn't budge. I've come to the point that I've run it with no shear pins and am injecting the grease zerks daily with Kroil. Hoping that I will get them freed up.:huh:

I've since moved on to the tractor. I noticed that the axle shafts were loose. Figured bearings. But alas the axle shafts have been spinning in the bearing races. Both axles are grooved. At $150 a pop, I'm considering my options as far as repairing them.:icon-thumbsdown: Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

With over 400' of driveway to blow, in Northern Mn. I'm sure this thing is going to cut my work time in half compared to my 1972 ST824





 

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Discussion Starter #3
Yeah, It's got the reduction drive. Right axle is long, left axle is short. The parts diagrams shows the left axle on one page, and the right axle on the next page.

I used to have access to a complete machine shop. Not at this time though.
 

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I might know someone who could help (for a fee). My ST1032 had exactly the same problem - a friend of mine is a machinist and he actually flame-sprayed new metal onto the axles then machined them back down to the proper diameter.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Guize.

I was thinking of welding, and then turning them. I just don't have the capabilities at this time

What kind of fee would we be looking at for the flame-spray/machining?
 

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I'll ask him and post back. He did mine on a barter basis so there wasn't a dollar amount. He's also not his own boss so doing side work can be problematic if they're busy.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
That'd be great. I do know that side jobs can be a hassle at certain times

Thanks for the effort.
 

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Hey no problem!

I emailed him and got a reply but unfortunately it's bad news. He spent about 7 hours reworking mine (apparently they were bent a little which accounted for one hour) and at $50/hour that would cost more than buying new ones. So that really wouldn't be a sensible approach.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yeah, If I had to put 7 hours into them, I'd prolly just wrap them with shim stock instead.

I used to work at a production facility in the winter mo's. Doing machine work/fabrication. It'd prolly take me an hour to repair these there.
 
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